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Old PT wod killed my tablesaw

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Forum topic by gbarron1 posted 04-27-2015 02:59 AM 1108 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gbarron1

8 posts in 1372 days


04-27-2015 02:59 AM

We replaced a wrap around deck on a 1980 house we bought 5 years ago. I recycled the deck boards for a fort for my son. All new posts and lumber for the “house” but used recycled for the deck, railing and balusters. I ripped all the balusters from 2×6 to 1-3/4 and burnt out the motor on my tablesaw with about 100 balusters left to rip. I know PT does a number on blades, but now I need a new saw and don’t want to kill the motor. i also need the saw to be portable. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


10 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 04-27-2015 03:27 AM

Depends on what you mean by ‘burned out’ the motor. What make/model saw was it and how did it die? Might be fixable, or might be a basket case and you need to search for a replacement. Induction motors are pretty hard to kill and many times it is something simple.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Dan658's profile

Dan658

93 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 04-27-2015 03:30 AM

I suspect it was more to do with the age or quality of saw rather than the PT itself. Are you thinking portable as in bench top or contractor?

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1944 posts in 1450 days


#3 posted 04-27-2015 11:41 AM

A couple thoughts….

On a portable saw you probably need to let it cool down and not just continuously cut.

Watch the blade for dullness and build-up which will cause motor to work too hard.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#4 posted 04-27-2015 12:52 PM

I would be a bit concerned about pressure treated wood of that vintage. It is likely that it was treated with the old arsenic based preservative. Wear dust protection when you are sawing it and clean up the sawdust afterwards. If I actually knew it had the arsenic preservative, I wouldn’t use it for a playhouse.

Here is one of many links I found through Google:

http://www.cehn.org/files/Arsenic_7_12.pdf

You can get a test kit to see if the wood you have is safe.

Great looking fort, by the way. The kids should get a lot of fun out of it. A good place to use their imagination while playing without relying on a video game for entertainment.

View Mykos's profile

Mykos

102 posts in 1256 days


#5 posted 04-27-2015 02:45 PM

I’d say you need to keep the blade clean and sharp in future, and/or lower your feed rate. If the motor is burned out than the saw was being worked too hard. My 1HP contractor saw will rip 2” hard maple all day long with a sharp blade (thin kerf) and an appropriate feed rate. Pressure treated shouldn’t be that hard on the saw unless it’s wet.

I’d clean the blade well when you’re done and vacuum up all sawdust from it as the treating compounds will be quite alkaline and cause corrosion rapidly if left in contact with the metal though.

Great looking fort by the way.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#6 posted 04-27-2015 10:06 PM

The old CCA PT had issues, but after 40+ yrs there is no issue with the arsenic in it. The wood does appear to become denser as it ages, in 09 I removed and replaced a PT deck off a house built in 82 and then built an outdoor table top out of some of the 1X6 decking and it was pretty hard.

It’s possible and old direct drive TS motor, portable or not could cook under constant stress. If it was new and a rather cheap model it could have so many plastic parts that something might have melted over a contact or brush, (had that happen to a craftsman recip saw, not to mention having 1 of their TS’s motors cook). I gave up on Craftsman in the mid to late 80s.

Just as simple an older model might have vibrated a connector loose or the start switch could have melted. Skill had issues with triggers in the 80s. If the TS is less than 10yrs old and better than the average bear your best bet would be to take it to a tool repair shop for a diagnosis.

Unfortunately many trusted brands have gone down the tubes over the last 15 to 20 yrs due to corporate buyouts.

-- I meant to do that!

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#7 posted 04-28-2015 01:07 AM

I am more than a bit curious to understand how you know that there is no issue with the residual arsenic. It was pressure forced into the interior of the wood, hence the “pressure treated” descriptor. It was never a surface treatment. It is embedded in the wood. It will remain there forever. Weather it, mill it, bury it, or burn it, or even turn it into a play set for your kids, it will still retain the arsenic that was forced into the wood.

First of all, if it is a house form the “80’s” even given the maximum of a build in 1980, I it would be 35 years old, not your 40+ years.

What has the “denser as it ages” have to do with it? Glad to know that you built a table out of some reclaimed wood, but that has nothing to do with the residual arsenic content of pressure treated wood made three decades ago, and nothing to do with the wood you used.

This is not an anecdotal circumstance of “I used some old lumber and none of my kids are sick”’. It is a real issue of the continuing problem of residual arsenic treated lumber being recycled into playgrounds for kids.

Read a few of the links in the reference I posted or search on your own.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#8 posted 04-28-2015 02:12 AM

In the mid 80s, shortly after PT lumber began to appear in the Lumb yds I had PT in my garden as raised beds. My B-I-L who was into self sufficiency way back then used to get a magazine, can’t say I recall the exact name of the org but think, (Mother Earth something) or sounded like that. It was for going with natural materials etc, etc, I/we learned about ram earth structures, electricity production, sustainable gardening, you name it.

At the time I was framing condos in Mashpee and we were using PT inside the condos as collar beams, (they were to be covered with fin pine), after we had maybe a 1/3 of the units roughed we had to go back and remove all of the PT. Apparently it off gasses big time around 60° so it couldn’t be used in enclosed habitable structures.

Anyway 86-87, I recall reading one article in the magazine on the new PT lumber, regarding the lumber and the chems used in it. Big letters, “Do not use in vegetable gardens”! “If so remove immediately”! It ran off all the possible maladies the chems can cause in pregnant women, babies and children. Also in tests rendered by said group they calc’d 20 + something % of the chems leached out of the lumber in less than 2 yrs in above grade structures, faster in grade. There was specific numbers given and may have been higher and sooner than I can remember.

Anyway we removed all of it, (we had 2 daughters by 89) and I wasn’t going to play roulette with them.

1. I can attest to this, because of the number of yrs in the trade and all the building I’ve razed and or remodeled over 35 yrs. Once the PT begins to split, rot and become infested with insects it no longer has the protection afforded by the chems.

2. The warranty on non marine grade PT from the 80s was 25yrs above grade. If in grade 20 yrs and less depending on the soil conditions of the area.

-- I meant to do that!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#9 posted 04-28-2015 02:30 AM

Somehow, I don’t think it was arsenic that killed the table saw… but I could be wrong :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#10 posted 04-28-2015 03:18 AM

i am not so much concerned about what killed the table saw as I am about what could harm the OP’s kids.

Unfortunately, Ghidrah is wrong about the latency of the arsenic in old treated wood.

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