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Forum topic by oakdust posted 08-03-2009 08:44 PM 1490 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oakdust

177 posts in 3276 days


08-03-2009 08:44 PM

I have a small piece of corian counter top that was left over from a sink cutout. I need to square it and use it as a recess for a cabinet. Can it be cut on the table saw and not chip it? Or is there a better way?

-- Bob, Rockford IL,


12 replies so far

View Greg Wurst's profile

Greg Wurst

786 posts in 3292 days


#1 posted 08-03-2009 08:51 PM

Corian work very similar to wood, so as long as you use carbide-tipped blades you can cut it fine on the table saw. You can also route it just as easily. My wife turns Corian pieces into pens.

-- You're a unique and special person, just like everyone else.

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oakdust

177 posts in 3276 days


#2 posted 08-03-2009 09:34 PM

Cool, Thanks Greg

-- Bob, Rockford IL,

View FEDSAWDAVE's profile

FEDSAWDAVE

293 posts in 2892 days


#3 posted 08-04-2009 01:33 AM

oakdust…that would be Triple Chip saw blades for a virtual chip free cut.. Alternate bevel grind will leave a rough edge but it depends on what you’re using it for.

For the ultimate cuts in Solid Surface a MTCG (Modified Triple Chip Grind) is the best.

http://www.solidsurfacetooling.com

-- David, Tools4solidsurface.com

View Catspaw's profile

Catspaw

236 posts in 3275 days


#4 posted 08-04-2009 02:08 AM

Use a 1/2” straight router bit and a straight edge.

BTW, that peice was left there in case you ever needed a repair to your countertop (assuming you have corian countertops.).

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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oakdust

177 posts in 3276 days


#5 posted 08-04-2009 03:34 AM

Thanks guys. I cut it on the table saw and then trimmed it with a flush trim router bit. Worked great

-- Bob, Rockford IL,

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2862 days


#6 posted 08-04-2009 03:51 AM

If you have any left, make yourself a Insert for your tablesaw, they work great.

John

-- John

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BeeJay

71 posts in 2648 days


#7 posted 09-11-2009 01:13 PM

Also makes great runners for sleds etc. Keep it waxed and it runs lile water downhill.

-- If you try to fail and succeed, what have you done?

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oakdust

177 posts in 3276 days


#8 posted 09-11-2009 03:12 PM

Sled runners, that’s a great idea

-- Bob, Rockford IL,

View BeeJay's profile

BeeJay

71 posts in 2648 days


#9 posted 09-13-2009 11:05 AM

My son is a PRO cabinet maker and works with it and Granite a lot. He put me on to it a couple of years ago.

-- If you try to fail and succeed, what have you done?

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oakdust

177 posts in 3276 days


#10 posted 09-13-2009 02:49 PM

Do the cabinet shops normally pitch the small pieces? I am gonna start hanging around the cabinet shops

-- Bob, Rockford IL,

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3002 days


#11 posted 09-13-2009 04:21 PM

oakdust

I’ve got knife makers, pen turners, turners, interior designers, etc visiting my shop often, needless to say I have no scrapes so I would think you could go to a fabrication shop and they would give you their small pieces. Wouldn’t hurt to ask.

bruc

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View LesB's profile

LesB

1235 posts in 2903 days


#12 posted 09-13-2009 08:33 PM

All good advise but be sure to turn on your dust collector and wear a mask. The dust is like talcum powder and goes everywhere.

I have used larger pieces (12X18) to make cutting boards. Routing a “blood” groove around the edge and putting rubber feet on the bottom. Made great Xmas gifts one year for Xmas.
It works for table saw inserts but if you have a thin strip across to top of the blade opening like my Delta saw has it tends to break there. I also drilled and threaded holes to install headless screws in for fine tuning the level so it is flush with the top of the saw table.

-- Les B, Oregon

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