LumberJocks

Best wood for Dishware

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Pat Gornet posted 04-25-2015 09:25 PM 688 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Pat Gornet's profile

Pat Gornet

14 posts in 1453 days


04-25-2015 09:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bowls plates bowl plate cup cups wood wood selection wood choice dishware eating food

My girlfriend and I are making a dishware set, bowls, plates, cups. We are turning this on the lathe and I wanted to know about the best sort of wood to use that can stand getting wet and dry repeatedly and not crack too soon. Any suggestions?

~edit~
Let me clarify. I only instead to hand wash these items. Never in the dishwasher. I’m not looking for them to last forever, just something sturdy and beautiful. I have little concern for the “health risks” involving wood and food, we are healthy and keep things clean. I really just want to know what woods move the least from moisture and what wood is traditionally used as dishware.


8 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#1 posted 04-25-2015 11:11 PM

None recommended. Due to sanitary health concerns number one and all woods will crack with the multiple cycles of the high heat water in a dishwasher. For personal use you can use wood for salad bowels hand washing with warm water and anti-bacterial liquid dishwashing detergent only if they are maintained with mineral oil.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2277 days


#2 posted 04-25-2015 11:32 PM

I wouldn’t worry about health concerns – wood is hygroscopic and naturally anti-bacterial (which is why wood cutting boards are OK again in the food industry after being criticized for years). People have been eating off wooden dished for thousands of years and still do in some parts of the world. In the “West” ordinary people only started using anything other than wood on any scale in the eighteenth century.
But, of course, they did not wash with blazing hot water or use dishwashers. I would recommend a non-porous hardwood (sugar maple, beech, birch, cherry). The dishes will stand up to some washing, although they may well crack eventually.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#3 posted 04-26-2015 02:15 AM

In my state in the US, they do not allow wood cutting boards or utensils in commercial kitchens. Maybe in Canada they do.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#4 posted 04-26-2015 02:49 AM

Just do not put them in the dishwasher. Wash by hand and dry.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#5 posted 04-26-2015 03:10 PM


In my state in the US, they do not allow wood cutting boards or utensils in commercial kitchens. Maybe in Canada they do.

- pjones46

I remember there were some states that had such laws but, I believe, they have been reversed with new research. What state are you in ?

View Pat Gornet's profile

Pat Gornet

14 posts in 1453 days


#6 posted 04-26-2015 05:46 PM

let me clarify. i only instead to hand wash these items. never in the dishwasher. I’m not looking for them to last forever, just something sturdy and beautiful. I have little concern for the “health risks” involving wood and food, we are healthy and keep things clean. I really just want to know what woods move the least from moisture and what wood is traditionally used as dishware.

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1850 posts in 2447 days


#7 posted 04-26-2015 05:55 PM

Stick with wood that has closed pores.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2277 days


#8 posted 04-26-2015 06:44 PM

Birch is probably the most common wood used traditionally as dishware, from kuksas to eating bowls.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com