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Bread board end invisible joinery question

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Forum topic by ShawnSpencer posted 04-25-2015 08:17 PM 650 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


04-25-2015 08:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m working on a Nakashima n-12 table replica. I cannot tell how the bread boards are connected. From pictures there are no pegs or exposed joinery. I included one pic but, even from the bottom there is nothing. Anyone have an idea how to do this? I would like to keep the joinery invisible if possible.

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5 replies so far

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WhyMe

610 posts in 1021 days


#1 posted 04-25-2015 08:38 PM

Most likely a compression fit with just being glued in the center of the tenon. The bread board end is ever so slightly concave and the center is pulled tight when clamping putting the ends of the bread board under higher compression, that way no pegs are needed to hold the ends tight to the field.

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


#2 posted 04-25-2015 08:53 PM

Would the tenon be the full size of the mortise or would notching be necessary for movement? Like you would if it were pegged?

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WhyMe

610 posts in 1021 days


#3 posted 04-25-2015 09:10 PM

It could have a full length mortise and tenon or could be using short slots with dowels. Eitherway there need to be some leeway in the mortise or slots in the bread board to allow for movement in the field.

Edit: I think using dowels will be easier. Make the center dowel hole tight in the bread board end and the dowel holes out from the center will be elongated to allow for top movement. The only glue point is at the center dowel location for a length of a few inches. The key to a tight fit to the field is for the bread board to be slightly concave and being able to pull the gap close with long clamps when gluing.

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Adrock1

43 posts in 666 days


#4 posted 04-25-2015 09:24 PM

A compromise would be to pin it with dowels from the bottom that don’t penetrate all the way through to the top surface.

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


#5 posted 04-26-2015 01:18 AM

Pinning from underneath is the way I am leaning. Im guessing the tenon and compression joint is the traditional way and the way nakashima would have done it. Not sure if my skill set is good enough to make that work.

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