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Rikon 10-325 and 220V

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Forum topic by weldoman posted 04-25-2015 06:53 PM 677 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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weldoman

114 posts in 1518 days


04-25-2015 06:53 PM

Any of you guys with the 325 wire it for 220v and could you tell the difference from 110v. Thanks Dave

-- missouri, dave


7 replies so far

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 04-25-2015 06:56 PM

It really depends on the particular 110v circuit, and the amp draw of the 10-325. Some 110v circuits are better than others. If your 110v circuit is ideal, you may not notice much difference, but if you’re 110v circuit is causing voltage loss, it could be very noticeable. Are you currently have troubles with your 325 on the current circuit?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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weldoman

114 posts in 1518 days


#2 posted 04-25-2015 07:16 PM

No problems Scott, never tripped a breaker, I stalled the saw once but that was resawing with a dull blade. Just curious because I gave up on used and ordered a 2nd 10-325 from Sears today, Think I’ll try this one on 220v just to see.

-- missouri, dave

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firefighterontheside

13446 posts in 1317 days


#3 posted 04-25-2015 07:18 PM

I guess that grizzly didn’t work out for ya? I thought I might have seen it on CL after you got it.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MrUnix

4207 posts in 1659 days


#4 posted 04-25-2015 07:22 PM

The only real advantage you get on 240v is the ability to run smaller wire to the machine and maybe a slightly cooler running motor depending on how it’s wound. There is no difference in power between 240v and 120v. A 1HP motor will be a 1HP motor regardless of input voltage.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: As Scott mentioned, if you are pushing the limit of your 120v circuit, then going to 240v would be a better choice.. usually when you start getting over 1.5HP or so.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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weldoman

114 posts in 1518 days


#5 posted 04-25-2015 08:03 PM

Yea Bill, I didn’t care for the Grizzly 18”. I got all the bugs worked out of it and cleaned it up, looked like a new saw. I guess being 15 years old it lacked alot of the newer options I like on the Rikon. I put in on CL and sold it within a week, actually made a little on it.

Thanks for the info Brad.

-- missouri, dave

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#6 posted 04-25-2015 08:21 PM


No problems Scott, never tripped a breaker, I stalled the saw once but that was resawing with a dull blade. Just curious because I gave up on used and ordered a 2nd 10-325 from Sears today, Think I ll try this one on 220v just to see.

- weldoman

If you’ve got 220v readily available, it can’t hurt to make the switch. You might notice a difference, you might not, but the circuit should be less likely to cause voltage loss and the excessive heat associated with it.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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toolie

2022 posts in 2089 days


#7 posted 04-26-2015 11:43 AM

No additional power will result switching to 220v. Perhaps faster start up, but no additional hp.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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