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Is this a total Strip & Refinish job?

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Forum topic by usaftrevor87 posted 04-23-2015 11:06 AM 702 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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usaftrevor87

8 posts in 590 days


04-23-2015 11:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: refinish danish oil antique wood

So, I picked this piece up on craigslist & I LOVE IT! It is solid wood, w/ dowel construction and the seller told me it was around 100 years old. He said it was an old drafting table, but it is in ROUGH shape. I do not think it is worth much in monetary value but I would like to see it back to it’s glory days.
The more I look at I realize I am probably screwed trying to keep the patina and will probably have to bring it down to raw wood. It even looks like somebody refinished it before, but must’ve been awhile ago.

What is everyone’s opinions on how I should finish this?
I’m thinking now Strip, stain so it’s close to patina color (maybe a dark walnut), and poly.
Or I was thinking of maybe trying a Danish oil to try to blend in the damaged areas or maybe restore a finish? I don’t know. Here are pics.


7 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#1 posted 04-23-2015 11:15 AM

Can you run the top through a planer? If not, go to a cabinet shop and have them run it through belt sander. I would consider torching and wire brushing the top with some sort of oil finish.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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usaftrevor87

8 posts in 590 days


#2 posted 04-23-2015 11:33 AM



Can you run the top through a planer? If not, go to a cabinet shop and have them run it through belt sander. I would consider torching and wire brushing the top with some sort of oil finish.

- mrjinx007

Pardon my ignorance…. Torching the top? Like literally torching with a large propane torch?

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1173 days


#3 posted 04-23-2015 11:39 AM

Nice table. It might be worth to go a little easy at first. Perhaps worth trying to keep the crisp lines.
Have a look at what skilled Thomas Johnson does on his old piezes: https://www.youtube.com/user/johnsonrestoration

Let us know how it ends!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1395 days


#4 posted 04-23-2015 11:52 AM

Stripping and refinishing that is going to be a lot of work. I agree with mr jinx on taking it to a cabinet shop to sand the top down. If you do that all by yourself, it’ll take days depending on how particular you are.

If I were you, I’d leave it as is. If you are willing to put a whole lot of work into it to get it to look real good, then by all means.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#5 posted 04-23-2015 12:55 PM

I would strip and refinish. I would not torch and brush the drafting surface, that needs to be smooth to be functional. It looks like it has a lot of push pin holes, I would fill those as well when you are sanding it down. You could also save some work by installing a drawing board cover, like these. That way you wouldn’t have to get the surface perfect.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#6 posted 04-23-2015 01:36 PM

Torched table tops like this pine you have can look nice. shou sugi ban is an old Japanese method of preserving antique wood and other woods from insect and rot damage. Indians used to torch green wood saplings to harden the wood for arrows and so on. I hardened some of the logs I built my house with using the same method. It all depends on what you want the table function as. If you want a smooth top, you still can torch it and used epoxy to level the irregularities. If you want to restore it as a drafting table, then a different approach as suggested above would be a better choice.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View usaftrevor87's profile

usaftrevor87

8 posts in 590 days


#7 posted 04-23-2015 01:53 PM

This is what I’m thinking, opinions welcome. I’ve been experimenting with Danish Oil in Mahogany & Medium Walnut on the under side of the legs. 2 coats of medium walnut seemed to blend almost too good to be true with the old patina color. So this is my plan.
1. Plastic scraper to get off flaking old coat. Leaving the old finish in tact as much as possible.
2. Light sand, maybe 220, just to feathe old edges a little.
3. 2 coats of Medium Walnut Danish Oil (per instructions)
4. Wait 1 week (still chilly here in MN) & do 3 coats of wipe on poly
5. Hopefully admire the results haha probably going to get a piece of glass cut for the top because its pretty rough but to be honest i love that about it.

Torching looks cool but it isn’t for this piece.
I think i’m gonna use it as a dining table or desk (hence the glass top)

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