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Storage shed - potential shop sinking?

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Forum topic by jesinfla posted 04-21-2015 12:25 PM 1104 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jesinfla

274 posts in 598 days


04-21-2015 12:25 PM

There’s been quite a bit of rain here lately.

I have a 16’x20’ storage shed I’ve been considering making the shop, and I think it’s sinking on one side due to soft/wet ground.

It is not on a cement foundation, it rests on concrete blocks with a 4×4 base.

If I look at the base, the main 4×4 (20’ length) seems to be tilting towards the sink and if I look at the direction of the sink, the base blocks seem to have sunk a bit.

Is there an easy way or any way to re-shore/level the shed without tearing it down?

I’m kinda at a loss and don’t want to lose the shed – would a construction contractor be able to do this kind of work? It’s beyond my abilities I’m sure even though I built the thing.

Thanks in advance.

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(


15 replies so far

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bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 04-21-2015 12:41 PM

It could certainly be jacked up and have a better foundation installed beneath, without pouring concrete it shouldn’t be too expensive. That, however, would be the best way ensure the same thing doesn’t happen again.

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1190 days


#2 posted 04-21-2015 01:08 PM

Florida, home of the sink hole… Do you live in that area? If you do, I would think about looking for another place to live…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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jesinfla

274 posts in 598 days


#3 posted 04-21-2015 02:31 PM

No sinkholes here

Agreed that slab is best, but not going to happen – the cost is prohibitive and I don’t know how to do it myself. Plus I doubt I’d be able to move the shed to place a concrete foundation

Thanks for the responses

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#4 posted 04-21-2015 02:40 PM

Or pour footings.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Richard H

489 posts in 1141 days


#5 posted 04-21-2015 02:59 PM

You could do what my neighbors all seem to do and jack the low corner up with a car jack than use a piece of pressure treated lumber to fill in the space or just leave the jack there like one of them did (kidding). It’s not the right way to fix the problem but it is a quick fix and if the block was just settling and is done sinking it might never need to be adjusted again.

The right way to fix it is to probably set those blocks on concrete footings set to whatever depth your local code requires but that’s a lot more work. A contractor might be able to shift the shed off the blocks, redo them as footings and than shift the shed back on to them but I have no idea how much that might cost.

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MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2691 days


#6 posted 04-21-2015 03:06 PM

Harbor Freight sells jacks pretty cheep. Scissor type car jacks or bottle jacks. Check to see if you have room for a jack. If need be, you could cut out a hole or three in the floor to get into the inner area to shore it up. Then replace the floor as needed.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#7 posted 04-21-2015 05:57 PM

Sorry to say this but the USGS says the entire state of FL is riddled with carbonate/gypsum bearing karst that travels N up the coast through Georgia, N/S Carolina. If you’ve been subjected to a crap load of rain over an extended period the ground is likely acting like the beach at the water line. Even a slab will subside where the soil is wet and loose

-- I meant to do that!

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jesinfla

274 posts in 598 days


#8 posted 04-21-2015 07:45 PM

Went out and took some pics which may help the discussion:

The shed

4×4 runner starting to lean

The rear of the shed – the slab is starting to sink

I have a contractor coming by today (at least that’s what he said, who knows if he’ll actually show up) to give me a price on getting this done – if it’s too high, I’ll probably do a trip to HF this weekend (sale on a floor jack and a hydraulic jack) and buy both and see if I can do this myself.

Thanks as always in advance for the advice – it is greatly appreciated

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

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canadianchips

2345 posts in 2457 days


#9 posted 04-21-2015 08:19 PM


Just my thoughts !
Many years ago my DAD lowered a barn. Cut 8ft out from bottom and set remaining roof on foundation.
What we learned during that process is use a WIDE base block system as you lower it.
If that shed was mine I would buy some sidewalk blocks (24×24) and replace the cintern blocks it is sitting on. The wider pad will not sink into soft ground as fast. If the shed continues to sink you can add another sidewalk block, I believe they are 2” thick . I have move lots of 14×16 wooden grainery’s. (bins we called them). I used a JACKALL to lift them offr ground high enough o put my wheels underneath.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#10 posted 04-21-2015 08:26 PM

My old shop building was built in 40’s or 50’s on a similar “foundation” from salvaged material from a church fire (house was a parsonage). Wife swore the thing was going to fall in within a year of moving there in 1990. Its still standing firmly as ever…instead of 4X4 beams for floor, it is partially burned 6X6 timbers.

Maybe you could jack up that corner slightly, remove existing blocks and then use the wide blocks suggested above.

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jesinfla

274 posts in 598 days


#11 posted 04-21-2015 10:15 PM

Thanks guys – those 24×24’s sound like the ticket – not sure where I’d get them – don’t think I’ve seen them at HD – are they like pavers?

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

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canadianchips

2345 posts in 2457 days


#12 posted 04-21-2015 10:52 PM

Home Depot in CANADA carries them. Also Lowes. I’m sure USA is same.
They are outside in garden section.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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BurlyBob

3652 posts in 1726 days


#13 posted 04-21-2015 11:36 PM

You could make your own using Sackrete: water, a wheel barrow , elbow grease and a cheap homemade form.

Good to go!

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#14 posted 04-21-2015 11:54 PM

I’ve jacked mine up several times to readjust the concrete blocks, you can use bottle jacks (2) to jack up around each block than pour. 2’x2’ concrete pad allow it to set than replace the block and release the Jack, if possible dig in the center of each pad a post hole size hole at least 13” deep with a hand spade and allow the concrete to pour into the hole this will act as an ancher to keep the pad from settling.

Here are pictures of my blog the first stages of the addition, all of the outer pads have the holes dug in the center to act as an ancher.

http://lumberjocks.com/Blackie_/blog/54314

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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splatman

557 posts in 859 days


#15 posted 04-22-2015 03:35 AM

A jack, a level, some shims, and some blocks. I’m no stranger to untilting tilting buildings. I’ve even moved a few. If something needs to happen, I just get off my duff and make it happen!

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