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Wanting to make a brass mallet.

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Forum topic by Troy Cleckler posted 04-20-2015 09:31 PM 911 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


04-20-2015 09:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question milling shaping turning

I’v got a piece of brass 1-1/2”x3” to make a David Barron style chisel mallet. This actually come out of a machine differential as a part and has oil groves in it. I want it smooth and it won’t take off much to do that but was wondering what the process would be to clean it up and curve one end over some.
It seems that I’ve read a post of the process but can’t find it now that I need it. I can’t remember if it was from here or not. Seems that they used a file to shape it and sand paper to polish it. Could anyone that has made one of these give me a little help and direction.
Here is a copy of the raw stock that I have.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....


19 replies so far

View planeBill's profile

planeBill

506 posts in 1876 days


#1 posted 04-20-2015 09:51 PM

I don’t know for sure but it looks more like bronze than brass. Start with boring a hole for your haft, whatever shape that may be, the part that passes through the metal I mean, then go about shaping the ends. All should be fairly easy to do with good files. You could even start with a grinder, either a benchtop grinder with a wheel that’s not too rough and doesn’t clog easily, or use a handheld grinder with your stock in a vise. I think the benchtop grinder would give the best results. As for boring the hole for your haft, you could go the easiest rout and simply use a good sharp bit of the appropriate size.

-- I was born at a very young age, as I grew up, I got older.

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#2 posted 04-20-2015 09:57 PM

here’s a pic from the end after being touched with bench grinder. I think it’s brass. Doesn’t seem to be oily like bronze when I cut it or hit it with grinder.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#3 posted 04-20-2015 10:23 PM

Certainly looks more like brass to me than bronze. The lighter color and lack of porosity (from what I can see in the pictures) are tell tale signs as well. You could weigh it and calculate the density for additional confirmation.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#4 posted 04-21-2015 12:31 AM

I’d leave the oil groove in it. It will add some character.
Drill the center hole on the drill press. Just a piece of wood with a v will help hold it centered.(assuming you have a drill press)

Then sand it like you would if it was wood. Start about 120 grit and work up to 2000 for a nice luster.
Add the handle.
Adjust some plane irons!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#5 posted 04-21-2015 02:45 AM

It’s brass. Used angle grinder with coarse paint stripper disc and sanded through 2000 paper. Turned out good but still need to drill and put brass pin through it.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#6 posted 04-21-2015 04:43 AM

You got up to speed quickly on that project. Looks good.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#7 posted 04-21-2015 10:37 AM

Yeah, it’s almost like an obsession. Once I get started, I can’t stop til it’s done. How bad is that? Should learn to slow down and turn out better work, maybe.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View CL810's profile

CL810

3455 posts in 2455 days


#8 posted 04-21-2015 10:45 AM

Wow Troy, that turned out great! Glad it came together for you – super work!

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#9 posted 04-21-2015 10:49 AM



Wow Troy, that turned out great! Glad it came together for you – super work!

- CL810


Thanks.
Did you have to pin your head to the handle? I’m gonna have to on this one. It’s tight but I can turn the head if I wanted too.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View nakmuay's profile

nakmuay

19 posts in 820 days


#10 posted 04-21-2015 11:39 AM

I just wanted to point out the fact that grinding brass on a bench grinder is VERY dangerous. It has the same effect as grinding aluminium. You can load up the pores in the wheel and causes an imbalance. When the imbalance gets too bad the wheel will explode like a fragmentation grenade. If you have a strong stomach google “bench grinder injuries”.
A rough grit sanding disk will take down brass easily with none of the danger.

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CL810

3455 posts in 2455 days


#11 posted 04-21-2015 11:54 AM

Ya Troy I did. I bought some rod at Lowes.

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#12 posted 04-21-2015 01:09 PM



I just wanted to point out the fact that grinding brass on a bench grinder is VERY dangerous. It has the same effect as grinding aluminium. You can load up the pores in the wheel and causes an imbalance. When the imbalance gets too bad the wheel will explode like a fragmentation grenade. If you have a strong stomach google “bench grinder injuries”.
A rough grit sanding disk will take down brass easily with none of the danger.

- nakmuay

Absolutely a dangerous tool if simple precautions are not followed, e.g.:the 1/8” gap between the tool rest and the wheel,not wearing gloves(other than buffing),wheel side protection /front clear plastic visors installed,etc,etc.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#13 posted 04-21-2015 01:14 PM



I just wanted to point out the fact that grinding brass on a bench grinder is VERY dangerous. It has the same effect as grinding aluminium. You can load up the pores in the wheel and causes an imbalance. When the imbalance gets too bad the wheel will explode like a fragmentation grenade. If you have a strong stomach google “bench grinder injuries”.
A rough grit sanding disk will take down brass easily with none of the danger.

- nakmuay


I just touched the end up on the bench grinder to clean the cut. As i mentioned, I mounted it in the lathe and used an angle grinder with paint stripper pad to do the bulk of the work.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

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Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 838 days


#14 posted 04-22-2015 02:51 AM

Decided the handle wasn’t right, carried it to work and picked it up throughout the day and something just didn’t feel right. Before I pinned the handle I decided to give it another try. Here’s the results. It feels much better and I took the time to fit the handle wedge tighter and pinned it with a turned downed piece of black walnut so I can replace the handle easier if ever I need to.
Here it is. Any thoughts, comments?

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

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CL810

3455 posts in 2455 days


#15 posted 04-22-2015 03:48 PM

That wood looks familiar!

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

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