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Forum topic by FancyShoes posted 04-19-2015 05:14 PM 800 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FancyShoes

509 posts in 830 days


04-19-2015 05:14 PM

I am going to be making some raised garden beds, i was just going to make them with heat treated pallets that i can get for free from work. Most of them are oak. Would I need to Clear coat them, or paint them at all to keep them looking good over the years?

What would some of you do? I reLly dont want them to grt that gray color!


9 replies so far

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#1 posted 04-19-2015 05:26 PM

I think it’s possible there is a finish you could apply often that could slow the graying, but since you’re growing food which is a natural process, I think your best bet is to be ok with the graying which is also a natural process.

Nothing will hold up for a long time in contact with dirt except pressure treated, and you don’t want that with dirt that’s growing food.

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#2 posted 04-19-2015 05:40 PM

Actually, eastern red cedar (the red heartwood only, not the white sapwood) will last a long time in contact with the ground, as will black locust…

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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FancyShoes

509 posts in 830 days


#3 posted 04-19-2015 05:58 PM

Thanks forbthe input, i will keep the cedar as a option.

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#4 posted 04-19-2015 06:02 PM

Good point Herb. The red heartwood is next to impossible to buy around here (eastern US near where it grows). It will still go grey too though, right?

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#5 posted 04-19-2015 08:10 PM

Tim,

Yes, the red cedar will grey with exposure to the UV in sunlight. The greying in inevitable with any species of wood I believe. The most effective treatments will only delay it a short while…

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#6 posted 04-19-2015 08:57 PM

I don’t think you can put anything on them that will work in that type application.
Yes, it is best to go with a naturally resistance wood but since its in direct contact with soil, even cedar will eventually break down.

I’ve used sawn boards outside they will eventually come apart.
I’ve also used cedar for fence posts as long as the heart remains intact they’re pretty rot proof.

Have you considered composite decking?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 688 days


#7 posted 04-19-2015 09:01 PM

If you’re using it for flowers and not vegetables then use PT, ACQ eventually turns brown and then a greyish.

-- I meant to do that!

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Mykos

102 posts in 1261 days


#8 posted 04-20-2015 02:46 AM

You should come to terms with the fact that a wooden raised bed frame is only temporary. If you use the right wood it can last awhile, but wood is natural and being in contact with damp soil then all wood will rot.

The farm where I work we made new raised beds for the garden last year. We used western red cedar and milled it to 2.25” thick by 7” and went two high for a raised bed height of 14”. They look great and they will last a long time. No finish, so they are turning silver. But in 10 – 15 years, someone will probably have to replace them.

If you want them to last for your grandkids make them out of brick/stone/concrete.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1894 days


#9 posted 04-21-2015 10:18 PM

I used cedar and painted them with oil based primer then 2 coats of exterior PVA on all sides. Joined the corners with double dovetails and 3” pocket screws. they are 2 years old and doing fine.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/101148

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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