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Protecting cast iron surfaces during storage

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Forum topic by DrPuk2U posted 04-18-2015 03:51 PM 2782 views 1 time favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DrPuk2U

56 posts in 1987 days


04-18-2015 03:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cast iron rust prevention storage tablesaw

Sadly, I am having to leave my beautiful shop in northern Illinois because we are moving to Seattle (into a temporary rental house). Eventually, I’ll get a new shop, but in the short term (6-12 months) I won’t have much of a shop so all the big machines (tablesaw, bandsaw, jointer, drill press, etc.) are going into storage. The storage is “climate-controlled” but I worry about the cast iron surfaces. I thought that perhaps simply waxing them heavily might be sufficient, but have received some apparently sage advice that something heavier would be a good idea.

The machines came coated with cosmoline (or similar) which was a bear to clean off. I’d kind of like to avoid that, especially as I will then need to wrap the whole surface in something else as the movers won’t like wrapping their quilts around something coated in ooge.

Thoughts? Suggestions? TIA, Ric

-- Ric, Northern Illinois, "Design thrice, measure twice, cut once... slap forehead, start over"


49 replies so far

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canadianchips

2580 posts in 2691 days


#1 posted 04-18-2015 03:57 PM

I moved 3 years ago. Put mine in container storage. BAD MOVE. I have surface rust on every good tool that I cared for . I put automotive wax on mine thinking it wood help. In my case it DIDn’t. Hopeful climate controlled will be better, I only hope your tools don’t end up like mine ! My furniture container had MICE !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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hotbyte

966 posts in 2670 days


#2 posted 04-18-2015 04:32 PM

No real world experience with this but just wax doesn’t seem like it would be sufficient. Even though the storage is climate controlled, for that length of time I would prepare as if it was not controlled. A power outage, failed climate control equipment, etc. might leave the storage non-climate controlled for a short while.

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ElChe

630 posts in 1031 days


#3 posted 04-18-2015 04:40 PM

Shellac or lacquer the CI surfaces?

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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Redoak49

2572 posts in 1683 days


#4 posted 04-18-2015 04:57 PM

I have heard that a product called LPS 3 works very well. I would also add a solid cover over the top to protect from damage.

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MrUnix

5429 posts in 1893 days


#5 posted 04-18-2015 04:59 PM

Good thick coat of paste wax, then cover to keep condensation and/or moisture from humidity off the surfaces. Breathable cotton packing blankets seem to work pretty darn good. Some have commented that placing plywood on top first also helps… cardboard might work as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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altendky

169 posts in 1904 days


#6 posted 04-18-2015 06:18 PM

When I cleaned up my jointer bed and table saw I tried coating with the Johnson’s paste wax and then buffing it off. More surface rust within a week I think? Used the Boeshield acid cleaner then the rust inhibitor a few years ago and they have both been fine since in a non-climate controlled garage in Maryland (well, a few months across the border in PA now as well). So, I don’t have a lot of experience but the Boeshield sure seems to be working great, and that’s with a surface you can work on so no goo to get all over the blankets or clean off after storage.

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canadianchips

2580 posts in 2691 days


#7 posted 04-18-2015 06:34 PM

I did have plywood on top of table saw.
The rust was underneath.
On my jointer I had made a custom fitted cover from and old lined barbeque cover. It also had rust under this cover.
Maybe cotton blankets would have helped, I initualy thought they might be worse with dampness, never dry out.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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MrUnix

5429 posts in 1893 days


#8 posted 04-18-2015 06:34 PM

Used the Boeshield acid cleaner then the rust inhibitor a few years ago and they have both been fine since in a non-climate controlled garage in Maryland (well, a few months across the border in PA now as well)

Rust-free and T-9?

Rust-free is a solution of phosphoric acid (~30%), alcohol (~10%) and water. T-9 is basically just paraffin wax and mineral oil suspended in mineral spirits. Both are easy to make yourself and you can alter the concentrations to suit your needs. I am not aware of any Boeshield rust ‘inhibitor’ other than T-9, and for about the same price as a 12oz spray bottle, you can make up a gallon of the stuff yourself :)

The key though is to keep moisture away from the metal, however you do it.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Phosphoric acid when used on rust will convert it to ferric phosphate, which will act as a protective coating. Same stuff in Navel Jelly and other similar rust converters.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BroncoBrian

436 posts in 1653 days


#9 posted 04-18-2015 06:37 PM

6 months is not that long. Climate controlled is good.

How humid is the area this will be stored? If there was a power outage, I would not suspect a closed up storage unit would start rusting out in a day or two. Paste way or Boeshield should be fine. I wonder if plastic wrap pressed onto the surface would help as well.

I had to send a lot of tools from a storage unit in Texas to Colorado. There was little rust on anything and they were not climate controlled for 4 years in storage. Just opened one of the large tool crates yesterday to find everything in perfect condition (6 years later). Houston sucks. Illinois cannot be that bad.

Wax will last a long time when not being scraped off daily.

Seattle on the other hand will require more maintenance.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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TheFridge

7268 posts in 1180 days


#10 posted 04-18-2015 06:39 PM

A couple coats of paste wax. If you’re not using your equip its not coming off. A cover works wonders too. I’ve had condensation thick enough to bead in spots and found rust on my table saw blade and jointer knives but none on the tables.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

41 posts in 1615 days


#11 posted 04-18-2015 10:32 PM



I have heard that a product called LPS 3 works very well. I would also add a solid cover over the top to protect from damage.

I have used LPS on guns, 3 is real thick should work look it up!
- Redoak49


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Richard H

489 posts in 1375 days


#12 posted 04-18-2015 10:52 PM

I had my cast iron tools in a POD container at their warehouse in storage for 3 years. I cleaned everything as well as I could to get sawdust off of them, used liberal amounts of Boeshield T-9 and paste wax on my surfaces than put packing paper on the surfaces before covering with drop cloths (not plastic). Maybe I was lucky and maybe it was the dry air in Colorado but they came out without a spec of rust at the end.

The paper was dry when I pulled it off with no water marks at all on it. I’m not sure I would cover them with plastic or wood as I would be afraid of water building up between the tool and the barrier. I wanted something that breathed at least a bit. If I thought water might fall on the surface I might cover the cloth drop cloth with plastic however.

Good luck with the move.

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jsuede

69 posts in 918 days


#13 posted 04-18-2015 10:57 PM

http://www.cosmolinedirect.com/

Cosmoline is what manufactures use when shipping unpainted/uncoated metals. It’s time consuming to remove, but has the staying power if you want to apply and forget without worry.

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MrRon

4173 posts in 2938 days


#14 posted 04-18-2015 11:17 PM

I would apply oil to all CI surfaces and cover the oiled surfaces with brown paper. The oil should hold the paper in place.

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bc4393

46 posts in 837 days


#15 posted 04-19-2015 12:04 AM

WD40 Specialist long term corrosion inhibitor. If your not using the machine and worried about residue on your wood, this is it. This crazy outdoor saltwater and weather elements test this guy did on different rust inhibitors made a believer out of me. Check it out.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667

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