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Forum topic by yoitsscholzy posted 04-17-2015 06:24 PM 782 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yoitsscholzy

3 posts in 1169 days


04-17-2015 06:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer problems

Hello! So I just got my first jointer. It’s my Grandpa’s old Jet JJ-6CS. When I got it from him it was in moderate condition. He enjoys woodworking, but he just likes building stuff – he doesn’t care much for taking care of equipment, finishing, etc. So I took a few days and cleaned it up as well as I could. Once I got it ready I tried making some test cuts, and so far my results are… less than ideal.

The biggest problem I’m having is that on just about every cut I’m tapering off the back like 4 inches or so. It doesn’t seem to matter if I’m face jointing or edge jointing, it’s happening either way. I don’t know enough at this point to know if somehow it’s technique, or if it’s the machine.

I’ve done my best to set up the machine per a hybrid of instructional videos and articles I’ve read. I bought a good straightedge (Woodpeckers SERX-36) and some feeler gauges to set it up, and the infeed table is great. Dead flat. The outfeed table however has about a .004 gap in the middle across it’s length. Is that enough of a problem to produce the taper? I’ve tried sanding some of the high spots down, but, yikes!

Any help would be appreciated!

-- Andrew


9 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#1 posted 04-17-2015 06:32 PM

Is the top of all the knives on the same plane as the outfeed table? If they were high then the cut would be over the outfeed table rather than on it and, depending on your methodology, once you get to the end it could produce this taper.

#LoveYourJointer

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#2 posted 04-17-2015 06:55 PM

That is my guess as well. Sounds a lot like the blades are high. You need a quality straight edge across the outfeed table and the knives should kiss the blade.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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yoitsscholzy

3 posts in 1169 days


#3 posted 04-17-2015 07:03 PM

Ok – so “kiss the blade” may be where I’m hung up. I used a jointer pal to set up my knives, which I’m not fantastic with, but I felt alright about them all being the same height, level, etc. Then I set the outfeed table slightly lower, per instructions I read/saw several places, but perhaps I just went a little too low?

I’m not getting any snipe. When I first started I was getting some snipe, so I adjusted that out. It seems to me like the knives being too high would cause snipe, not a taper, am I wrong?

-- Andrew

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#4 posted 04-17-2015 07:11 PM

I would get a dial indicator for this. It removes the hummm-about-right-thereness from the setting/ tweaking.

Set the outfeed lower? How much lower? I would say that the outfeed and tip of the knives should be dead nuts. I have heard that the outfeed can be .002 off but why when there is perfection right there…with a dial indicator.

#DeadNutsJointer

Im a bit passionate about the jointer.


Ok – so “kiss the blade” may be where I m hung up. I used a jointer pal to set up my knives, which I m not fantastic with, but I felt alright about them all being the same height, level, etc. Then I set the outfeed table slightly lower, per instructions I read/saw several places, but perhaps I just went a little too low?

I m not getting any snipe. When I first started I was getting some snipe, so I adjusted that out. It seems to me like the knives being too high would cause snipe, not a taper, am I wrong?

- yoitsscholzy


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#5 posted 04-17-2015 07:39 PM

I disagree with the advise you have been given. Usually a tapered board is a result of the infeed and outfeed tables not being perfectly coplanar. You need a quality straightedge and automotive style feeler gauges to check this. Try to get the tables coplanar to within .005”.

When the knives are set improperly, you will see snipe or an excessively wavy cut pattern.

Good luck.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#6 posted 04-17-2015 08:31 PM

Andrew I have used the Jointer Pal or what looks like the current product for well over 20 yrs, the jig sets the knives to the outfeed table, so there’s no need to lower the outfeed after the knives are set, if anything you may have to raise it.

The jig is pretty good but in my case the act of securing the knives more often than not causes them to rise up a smidge. If you don’t have the cutter head secured at 0° TDC the knives may be lower than the outfeed.

I suggest you lower the infeed table below the cutter head block (cutter head rotates in it) secure the straight edge, (so you don’t have to worry about it) over the cutter, get your ear as close as possible and listen for the faintest scrape sound from the highest set blade as you rotate the cutter head. Using that sound indicator mark the top of the cutter head #1 then the side of it and the cutter head block as a TDC reference point. Leave knife #1 in place unless dulled. Do the same for #2 and #3. Adjust the outfeed for each if necessary but remove each knife after setting the reference mark.

Readjust the outfeed table to #1 and don’t touch it till all knives are set. Rotate to #2 and secure the cutter head to 0° TDC install the knife and set the jig in place. Mark the position of the jig so you can replace it exactly for each knife. Gently snug the screws, alternating back and forth snugging further each time. Repeat process for #3. When done reset the straight edge over the cutter head, begin at #1 to ensure nothing has changed then go to #2. Move cutter head back and forth and listen if scrape is louder, take note then go to #3 and repeat.

Odds are they all will be within .001; I usually end up with 2 @ Ø and 1 higher or lower. I live with it by resetting the outfeed to the highest knifes. I also use a slow feed rate which I believe improves the cut, I never feel the need to sand a jointed surface.

-- I meant to do that!

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1929 days


#7 posted 04-17-2015 08:40 PM

I d get all the knives set to the same height
Run a guest piece an inch or two over those knives then back off the cut
Adjust the out feed tablet to meet the cut that they knives made

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#8 posted 04-18-2015 12:30 AM

IF your jointer is set up correctly, you will taper the trailing end of your boards if you are applying down pressure on the infeed side of the cutter head. All down force should be on the outfeed side.

I tweaked on my jointer for a long time before I realized it was my poor technique (not the set up) that was causing my problems.

Another thought: If you are trying to joint the convex side of the board (rather than the concave side), you will also taper the board.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#9 posted 04-18-2015 06:52 PM

Have you checked that the fence is 90 to the table?
” Then I set the outfeed table slightly lower, per instructions I read/saw several places,”I think the outfeed table should be higher due to the missing wood the knifes take off.I.e the outfeed side of the board is going to be narrower/thinner than the infeed side.

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