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Recess for bolts with forstner bit

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Forum topic by PaulHWood posted 04-16-2015 01:24 PM 899 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PaulHWood

335 posts in 1714 days


04-16-2015 01:24 PM

Somebody may have a simple answer for this.

You have a hole drilled for a bolt, then decide you want the bolt head recessed, and want to drill the recess with say a forstner bit. Does anyone have a simple way to do this. Also, no drill press.

The only thing I was thinking was using a wood dowel to fill the hole.

Thoughts

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice


10 replies so far

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#1 posted 04-16-2015 01:56 PM

Easy to do with the drill press, but since you said that’s not an option, what size is the current hole? If it’s larger than the bearing on a rabbeting bit, you can use a router. Otherwise, your dowel idea sounds like a good option. Might be able to pull it off with a spade bit, but it’d be difficult and the results might not be pretty if this is going to be a visible part.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#2 posted 04-16-2015 01:58 PM

The dowel might work. It always best to drill the big hole first then the little hole for counter sunk bolts.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#3 posted 04-16-2015 02:01 PM

Take a piece of scrap wood and drill a hole with the forstner bit. Place the scrap over the wood where you want to drill the recess and clamp it in place. You will have to center it by eye. Now use the scrap as a guide to hold the forstner bit in place.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#4 posted 04-16-2015 02:09 PM

+1 WoodNSawdust

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3930 posts in 1954 days


#5 posted 04-16-2015 03:48 PM

Yep, what WoodNSawdust said works.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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PaulHWood

335 posts in 1714 days


#6 posted 04-16-2015 04:17 PM

Thanks, thought of this when thinking of using a router, and I don’t know why I wouldn’t just apply the same thinking to a forstner bit

thanks for all the responses


Take a piece of scrap wood and drill a hole with the forstner bit. Place the scrap over the wood where you want to drill the recess and clamp it in place. You will have to center it by eye. Now use the scrap as a guide to hold the forstner bit in place.

- WoodNSawdust


-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#7 posted 04-16-2015 04:34 PM

I recently “invented” another way to do this that works well. But it requires a pretty specialized chairmaker’s tool, namely a tapered reamer. I use the reamer to taper the top of the hole just enough so that the largest diameter (right at the surface) is just barely bigger than the forsner bit. Then drill with the forsner – it will self feed on the outside of the hole and drill a perfect recess. I was quite pleased with myself when I came up with this to get me out of a jam, but realize that it won’t work for everyone.
I always feel so stupid when I realize that I’ve drilled the hole before the countersink…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View AESamuel's profile

AESamuel

61 posts in 683 days


#8 posted 04-19-2015 05:35 PM

I’ve got a cone shaped step bit which I use to make the top 1-2mm of the hole the right diameter, then the forstner guides itself down. Its much easier than sticking a piece of wood in there, and more accurate than drilling a hole and then trying to centre it over your other hole.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3652 posts in 1726 days


#9 posted 04-19-2015 07:18 PM

You could use a hole saw to get it started, But honestly WoodNSawdust’s method is the easiest. Just use a piece of wood big enough to clamp it down.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#10 posted 04-19-2015 09:16 PM



The only thing I was thinking was using a wood dowel to fill the hole.

Thoughts

- PaulHWood

Yup!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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