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Forum topic by MsP115 posted 04-15-2015 11:23 PM 839 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsP115

5 posts in 601 days


04-15-2015 11:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing question

I recently bought this DIYed bench, and was wondering if anyone could tell me if it might be made from treated wood. It appears as though the whole thing is made from one solid crate (the underside says Ozark Box and Crating). The hardware may have been added, and of course the legs were as well. I have looked to see if there are any marks from the treating process, and the wood itself doesn’t appear to have a treated color. I asked my step-dad who has done a lot of wood working, and he says that it is unlikely to be treated, but I have no idea how old it might be. I guess I am just looking for more reassurance before I start storing stuff in it. Also, if it is treated, can I just put a coat of polyurethane or shellac over it?

thanks in advance for any advice!




12 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2061 days


#1 posted 04-15-2015 11:27 PM

Looks like Doug Fir to me.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#2 posted 04-16-2015 12:35 AM

Yes, definitely not a hardwood.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#3 posted 04-16-2015 01:35 AM

It looks like Ponderosa pine to me.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1377 days


#4 posted 04-16-2015 02:30 AM

I can almost guarantee you that if the table was made from a crate, that it IS treated. The entire shipping industry complains that the wood they use to ship things might have pests in it. I don’t agree that shipping pallets and crates need treatment but it is done. I would never do it, and there isn’t any reason why wood cannot be store somewhere where there are no pests.

Just my 2 cents.

http://nebula.wsimg.com/3260565083b7582ee1182cb9b2131677?AccessKeyId=6C3135A8FC70D15F8AD0&disposition=0&alloworigin=1

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View MsP115's profile

MsP115

5 posts in 601 days


#5 posted 04-16-2015 04:26 AM

I noticed what appeared to be some worm holes, would these be possible if the wood was treated? And is there anything I can do to make it safe for storage and just having in my house?

Thanks again!

View MsP115's profile

MsP115

5 posts in 601 days


#6 posted 04-16-2015 04:58 AM

Also, it appears to be an ammunitions crate, if that changes anything.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#7 posted 04-16-2015 10:57 AM

Based on those growth rings, it looks like some species of pine depending where in the world it originated.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#8 posted 04-16-2015 01:55 PM

I noticed what appeared to be some worm holes, would these be possible if the wood was treated?

If the worm holes were made before the tree was cut it is quite possible.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View MsP115's profile

MsP115

5 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 04-16-2015 02:37 PM

Thanks for all of the speedy replies :) I did some investigating online and think I found an answer, so I figured I would share the knowledge for anyone that want to work with old ammunitions wood. I guess wood crates used for ammunitions before 1980 are likely to have been treated with PCP. My bench is date marked 74 so bad news for it.

View Mykos's profile

Mykos

102 posts in 1258 days


#10 posted 04-16-2015 08:29 PM

I’d guess a pine more than Douglas fir. Could be wrong of course, but I see a lot of fir.

If you’re not going to be putting food on it, or cutting it up and breathing the dust then it probably doesn’t matter if it was treated 40 years ago.

View SlimPickins's profile

SlimPickins

121 posts in 1377 days


#11 posted 04-17-2015 01:29 AM

For those who have munitions or other boxes treated with PCP, here is some info. It is a carcinogen, and it has often been discarded in landfills and used as mulch by landscapers.

Here are two useful articles, particularly the 2nd one.

http://aec.army.mil/Portals/3/publications/wood.pdf

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/risk/guidance/gw/pcpinfosht.pdf

Perhaps some time in the future, you will find another box that isn’t treated. Those boxes are not expensive although since yours is a table, the size might be harder to match. Natural wood usually has a
better smell. White oak smells like sugar.

Thanks, I hadn’t realized that those boxes were treated with PCP. My box does not appear to be treated and was used by my father for his post World War II army duty. But I will have to have a 2nd look to be sure.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

View MsP115's profile

MsP115

5 posts in 601 days


#12 posted 04-18-2015 01:58 AM

I was wondering the same about the potency of the PCP over such a long period of time. Finding information on pallet wood and its safety is much easier than finding anything on ammunitions boxes, even though I have seen quite a few of the boxes for sale. One article I read mentioned that the PCP can stick around for a long time, so I don’t think I am going to take a chance with it since my primary use was as a dog toy storage chest. I couldn’t find any way to visually identify a treated box, unfortunantly. Glad I could provide some useful info.

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