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Forum topic by AZWoody posted 04-13-2015 11:52 PM 770 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


04-13-2015 11:52 PM

My dad just bought a 34 Chevy 1 ton and the bed and rails all need to be replaced.
What’s currently on it are old 2x lumber and I want to redo it and make it more like an original style.

I’m not sure if I want to go full flat bed, or some of the other varieties they had but I do want to see if anyone knows what the original type of wood that was used for those old vehicles.

I saw one place that makes interior panels out of white ash but I can’t find any info on truck bed exteriors.

In my mind, something like ash or white oak but wondering if anyone has any experience with this sort of thing.


10 replies so far

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1971 days


#1 posted 04-14-2015 12:32 AM

Great post. Give some background info, state the problem, give your best guess and finally ask for help. You get ☆☆☆☆☆

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

552 posts in 2317 days


#2 posted 04-14-2015 12:50 AM

I think a lot of them were white oak.

-- Ken

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1921 posts in 1222 days


#3 posted 04-14-2015 12:55 AM

There were still a lot of them around when I was young. If my memory serves me, they looked like white oak. Can’t swear to it though.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14627 posts in 2150 days


#4 posted 04-14-2015 01:03 AM

Contact Silverado Trucks in Sidney, OH. The owner is a relative of mine. He redid a 34 Ford for the Great American Race. The bed had to be completely redone. My late father was the mechanic that got the old ford engine to run the entire race. Even set up dual carbs on it!

Don’t have Scott’s business phone number right now. I can look it up, if you want.

Scotts late dad did a LOT of vintage car restores…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 04-14-2015 01:06 AM

That is perfect. I really appreciate the hookup on that.
You can private message me the number if you like.

You should put up some pictures of the Ford, that must have been something else to see.


Contact Silverado Trucks in Sidney, OH. The owner is a relative of mine. He redid a 34 Ford for the Great American Race. The bed had to be completely redone. My late father was the mechanic that got the old ford engine to run the entire race. Even set up dual carbs on it!

Don t have Scott s business phone number right now. I can look it up, if you want.

Scotts late dad did a LOT of vintage car restores…

- bandit571


View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#6 posted 04-14-2015 04:00 AM

I help a lot of guys restore pickups. They usually use white oak, coated in clear epoxy (West Systems 207), then topped off with either Sikkens Cetol for breath-ability or a two part varnish like Interlux Perfection or Bristol Finish. Good luck, awesome project!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View bold1's profile

bold1

262 posts in 1314 days


#7 posted 04-14-2015 11:14 AM

White Oak. The best were boards split and planed. They claimed the heat of a saw opened the pores and let them rot faster. Split White Oak boards also have strength like plywood. Most were then oiled so when you scraped them you could retouch them.

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AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#8 posted 04-14-2015 06:41 PM

Interesting on the split oak. I wonder if they were using green lumber or dried for that.

On the epoxy, wouldn’t that completely seal it to where any other finish over it wouldn’t be allowed to breathe?

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bold1

262 posts in 1314 days


#9 posted 04-14-2015 11:07 PM

I believe Swab Wagon which went on to make custom bodies for ambulances and rescue trucks, split them green, then dried, then worked them. White oak was split for the wooden spoked wheels, also.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1331 posts in 1444 days


#10 posted 04-14-2015 11:51 PM

I don’t know what type of wood was used on the original but I saw one of the rebuild shows on velocity channel that used birds eye maple. came out beautiful.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

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