LumberJocks

Table Saw: Would a Grizzly Hybrid be better than my Craftsman Contractor?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 04-13-2015 05:40 AM 848 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


04-13-2015 05:40 AM

I am thinking the answer is “yes” but I’d like to verify.

My current TS is a Craftsman 113 series “3HP” contractor saw with a 40” Vega Pro fence (this is nice). Grizzly’s tent sale is coming up in June, and there are a couple of things I’ve run into with my Craftsman that are becoming reasons to upgrade:

  • Riving Knife: I really would like a riving knife. Lately I’ve been using homemade splitters, but I’d like something taller and closer to the blade, especially now that I’m more frequently cutting thick stock.
  • Power: I may have reached my TS limits as it was very difficult to make a cut in 2” thick hard maple. I’m not sure that this would be solved by a Griz hybrid or not.

The G0715P is the hybrid I’m particularly interested in. It’s only advertised as a 2hp, but for some reason I trust that more than the craftsman rating.

Thoughts? Would this be an upgrade, or not enough to justify? Or, will a $1500 cabinet saw be a significant improvement over the hybrid?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


16 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7206 posts in 2835 days


#1 posted 04-13-2015 09:31 AM

The Grizzly hybrid has a history of some units having a mechanical defect that changes the alignment when the blade height is changed. It doesn’t impact all units, but those that it does aren’t fixable. There have been many claims that the issue has been resolved, only to have it continue to occur. The G015P fence is decent, but you may find that it’s not quite on par with your Vega. A non-defective G0715P, should offer some advantages over your current saw, but blade choice and good setup of the saw are huge factors to consider if your saw is struggling with 8/4 maple….are you using a decent quality 24T thin kerf blade that’s clean and sharp?

There is a significant step up to the true 3hp cabinet saws IMO…..there’s not only 50% more power (100% more than your 1.5hp contractor saw), a more efficient power transfer system, but the guts are also considerably more robust. There’s also more mass and the handwheels are much nicer, among other benefits.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View toolie's profile

toolie

2022 posts in 2088 days


#2 posted 04-13-2015 09:47 AM

I have two similar c-man saws. I opted to keep them over a 3hp unisaw I refurbished. With the proper blade, there’s not a lot in a hobbyists shop they won’t handle. It is, after all, a carbide tipped steel blade going through cellulose. Just alter the feed rate and use sharp, properly aligned blades and fences.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#3 posted 04-13-2015 10:27 AM

If you’re having problems cutting 2” maple you need to look at the blade sounds like it is dull or the blade isn’t aligned to the fence.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#4 posted 04-13-2015 12:15 PM

ok, so it sounds like I should wait and not mess with middle of the line.

I was truing/squaring up a 2” thick end grain board on a crosscut sled that has a base of 1/2” BB. So, the blade height was nearly maxed out to make this cut, so this may have been part of the problem. The teeth of the blade didn’t have much clearance above the wood. The saw struggled and blue smoke started to fill the garage. In this case, I was using a Freud 50t thin kerf combination blade (it probably needs to be cleaned/sharpened, it’s a 2-year-old LU83R010). When I ripped the 8/4 stock (1.75”) I had to take it slow, but there was no burning or smoke (in this case, a 30 tooth Freud ripping blade)

Thanks for the advice. I’ll clean the pitch off the blade, possibly get it sharpened, and save my money.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3420 days


#5 posted 04-13-2015 12:58 PM

Keith, methinks that you solved your problem by identifying the blade issue. 50 tooth and 30 tooth blades to handle some pretty tough wood. 40 and 24 tooth blades in good condition would be better blades for that task.
Just my thoughts.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13430 posts in 1316 days


#6 posted 04-13-2015 01:04 PM

I recently read that you don’t want the teeth to fully exit the piece as you make the cut, that would suggest that the height of your blade was not the issue. Blue smoke? What did it smell like? Are you sure sure your belt wasn’t slipping? That may happen from too much resistance caused by a dirty/dull blade.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#7 posted 04-13-2015 01:10 PM

Bill 1: I have a 24t Freud full kerf that I ought to use. Would a 40t give decent advantage over 50? I guess that would make sense.

Bill 2: Not a rubber smell, but then, I have a link belt which isn’t rubber. Good call, that’s probably it.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7206 posts in 2835 days


#8 posted 04-13-2015 02:17 PM

40T is likely too many teeth for ripping 8/4” maple….the parameters of each model vary, but generally 40T and 50T blades cover pretty much the same ground. Even the 30T in this case is really intended for 1” material… the side clearance on this blade is made to give a high polish, which contributes to burning in some materials. Raising the blade height can help a little, but I think you’re asking a lot from the LU83 and the LM75. Your 24T blade might be ok if you have enough power, but it might lug in 8/4 hard maple due to the full kerf width.

Your best bet is a good TK 24T ripper ($30), or possibly something like the Forrest WWII 30T TK blade (but that’ll run ~ $100). The 24T can leave a glue ready edge, but it’ll likely be borderline depending on several variables. The 30T WWII should leave a glue ready edge without much trouble and will still chomp through 8/4 pretty well.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#9 posted 04-13-2015 02:25 PM

Thanks for the reply Scott

This brings up an interesting question: If I have an end-grain board on a crosscut sled, am I ripping or crosscutting?

I had assumed crosscutting, but really the blade is cutting parallel to the wood fibers rather than perpendicular. So, would a ripping blade for this purpose actually be better?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#10 posted 04-13-2015 02:45 PM

I just bought a G0711 which is their new hybrid to replace my old Craftsman. It does not have the alignment issues that the G0715P had, as it has cabinet mounted trunnions. It doesn’t have as nice of a fence, but you can swap your Vega fence over.

If your Craftsman saw is anything like mine, It’s a major step up. I believe I had the same saw as you, but with the stock fence. The motor is better, can be wired for 220v, has dust collection, and is just all around a much better saw.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#11 posted 04-13-2015 04:44 PM

yeah other than a couple of quirks, I like my Craftsman quite a bit. It’s wired at 220v currently. My DC hacks are pretty rough and the tilt adjustment is difficult, but it cuts very smooth glue-line rips very easily with zero blade marks every time (note: I used Matthias Wandel’s method of truing the arbor with a sharpening stone, which helped bigtime!)

So, it will likely be difficult to switch saws since this one generally works super well (other than a couple quirks). Thanks for the advice about the blades. $NewBlade < $NewTableSaw

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#12 posted 04-13-2015 05:17 PM



Thanks for the reply Scott

This brings up an interesting question: If I have an end-grain board on a crosscut sled, am I ripping or crosscutting?

I had assumed crosscutting, but really the blade is cutting parallel to the wood fibers rather than perpendicular. So, would a ripping blade for this purpose actually be better?

- keith204

Any cut parallel to the grain is a rip cut.

Dude, based on what I’ve read in this post, you’re seriously due for an upgrade.
An under powered saw will make even a sharp blade smoke, don’t think that’s gonna solve your problem.

You’ve got a C’man saw and youre’ pushing it past its limit with what you’re doing.
Don’t go spending $250 on a saw blade that’s worth more than the saw, OK?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#13 posted 04-13-2015 05:24 PM


Thanks for the reply Scott

This brings up an interesting question: If I have an end-grain board on a crosscut sled, am I ripping or crosscutting?

I had assumed crosscutting, but really the blade is cutting parallel to the wood fibers rather than perpendicular. So, would a ripping blade for this purpose actually be better?

- keith204
Any cut parallel to the grain is a rip cut.

Dude, based on what I ve read in this post, you re seriously due for an upgrade.
An under powered saw will make even a sharp blade smoke, don t think that s gonna solve your problem.

You ve got a C man saw and youre pushing it past its limit with what you re doing.
Don t go spending $250 on a saw blade that s worth more than the saw, OK?

- Robert Engel

Sweet, so I’ll try a rip blade. Both of my rip blades perform well.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View hotbyte's profile (online now)

hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#14 posted 04-13-2015 05:34 PM

Seems reasonable to try the TK rip blade first. What’s the worst that can happen…you discover you don’t need a new saw after all? Or, is that the best that could happen? Buying new tools is so confusing :)

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#15 posted 04-13-2015 05:42 PM



Seems reasonable to try the TK rip blade first. What s the worst that can happen…you discover you don t need a new saw after all? Or, is that the best that could happen? Buying new tools is so confusing :)

- hotbyte

Yeah, I’ll definitely try that first. I’m not trying to rationalize a new saw, that would indeed be a hassle.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com