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Forum topic by pjones46 posted 04-12-2015 04:51 AM 1262 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


04-12-2015 04:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: router milling shaping question

I have a Bench Dog cast Iron router table with a hookup for dust collection on the fence, but, have been looking at a more efficient means of dust collection.

There are under bench dust buckets, a Incra CleanSweep downdraft dust collection system, the Keen Dust Collector Kit for Router Tables (which I tried and found not effective), as well as numerous designs of cabinets with enclosed built in dust collection access.

Has anyone seen anything other than the Keen Dust Collector Kit which protects the router from dust during its operation? I would think that there would be damage done to the router in a very short time while operating it in something like a dust bucket or closed cabinet due to exposure to excessive dust flow as well as excess heat generation.

Is this a major concern to anyone else?

-- Respectfully, Paul


14 replies so far

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#1 posted 04-12-2015 05:36 AM

No its not.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#2 posted 04-12-2015 11:18 AM

Nope, I’ve had my RT for about 14 years now and nary a problem with the router. This a a Norm type RT with a closed cabinet.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#3 posted 04-12-2015 04:16 PM

Paul, I agree with Fred. I’ve had a Freud FT 2000 in a Norm design and dust in the router has never been an issue.

-- Art

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 04-12-2015 06:09 PM

Even a 2HP DC system can flow 400cfm+ through a 4” hose.

If the router enclosure is 2ft3, new air will replace the air in the enclosure 200 times a minute or 3.3 times a second!!!!

Hardly enough time to get heat build up and not a concern.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Kelly

1110 posts in 2405 days


#5 posted 04-12-2015 08:10 PM

My PC 7518 is hiding in this beast.

With my dust collector drawing off the fence and the cover, rarely does a spec of dust escape the collector. Too, with the amount of air it takes to collect dust and chips, there isn’t much chance of heat building up in the router.

Just for reference, the bottom is just vinyl like you would use to cover a shower wall (left over from a job). There is a door in the side, in case I need to get inside. However, it’s about as easy to just lift the monster out by the plate.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#6 posted 04-12-2015 08:44 PM

@timbertailor

Assuming your pulling 400+ CFM through a 4” hose, where are you getting the replacement air being exhausted coming from? The insert in the table reduces the volume of air which you can intake to replace the air being exhausted which is substantially less than 400+ due to the restriction. Do you have a open port somewhere else in the closed router box to allow the introduce fresh air into the box which can then keep you up at the 400+CFM exchange rate?

I just can’t get the math for those numbers unless it is an open box with no input air restriction.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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Kelly

1110 posts in 2405 days


#7 posted 04-12-2015 09:55 PM

I didn’t caulk any of the joints, except where the vinyl connects to wood. A little air sneaks in at the door on the side and at the Y connector. Apparently, in combination with the two 2” openings, it’s enough that my “four bagger” collector doesn’t draw the vinyl in, at least visibly.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#8 posted 04-13-2015 03:24 AM

Thank you all for your input.

I am going to construct something like the below using a transparent plastic storage container with a hole cut in it, allowing the router motor air intake to be outside which will input fresh air through the router into the box which is then evacuated by the dust collector. The hole will fit around the router lift and router as tight as I can get it to allow full operation of the router lift. Both the fence dust port and the box will be connected to the 4” DC hose using 2” hose and a 4×2 x 2 Y fitting. I may even add an airflow ajustment hole/holes in the plastic box to maximize the air draw from the DC.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#9 posted 04-13-2015 04:17 AM

The seal from the box to the router as it moves up and down will be interesting to solve reliably and without limiting bit travel.

Flow will vary based on everyone’s design so deduct 10% to 50% of the flow and overheating is still not even a consideration.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#10 posted 04-13-2015 05:07 AM

I have some sheet silicone about 30 Shore A durometer which is very flexible but I am going to wait and see if I even have to add it. With the air draw from the DC I really want to have enough open space for an air draw so that I don’t get a reaction much like putting your hand over the end of a vac hose reducing effectiveness of air draw.

As far as heat, I have read many posts from a site specifically concerned with routers and there are conflicting views both ways that a closed container will exacerbate heat buildup if there is not enough air flow, as well as dust being pushed through the motor in a confined space.

So I guess the answer is; I don’t know what happens, but will err on the side of caution in hopes of protecting as much as possible the investment price of routers.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#11 posted 04-13-2015 11:12 AM

You will find conflicting opinions an absolutely everything, but go with your gut. On the hand, a hell of a lot of us have enclosed the router with no damage. Wish you the best with your plan!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1110 posts in 2405 days


#12 posted 04-13-2015 04:30 PM

Post throughout the net talked of certain PorterCable routers that, when mounted upside down, built up a bit of sawdust via exposed ports. Other PC routers did not not have the same problem, so mounting them upside down was a non issue.

The same would, of course, apply to other brands of routers.

After a few years of running my set up, with the entire router in a box, I pulled it and blew it out. The amount of dust build up was no more than any of my hand-held units.

I’m no physics major, or formally educated engineer, but if I had to bet on the cooler router, the one in the box or the one I’m holding by hand, it would be on the one in the box. With about 1900 CFM [unrestricted] at play, there is a lot of air moving past the motor, even if it is reduced to two inch ports [and some change].

Cooling fins on electronics are sufficient to keep sophisticated components from frying. Toss in the minor air flow of a computer fan and such delicate instruments, usually, last years.

All that said, if I wanted to take a week out and build a box that would slide into a box (the latter mounted to the underside of the table), I think it, like pjone’s idea, would be superior, if only for the ability to more quickly select speeds.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1110 posts in 2405 days


#13 posted 04-13-2015 04:33 PM

PJones, you might be able to use the long brush hair found on Paintshavers and other items to restrict airflow and dust or chip tossing.

A brush material may allow increased air flow, but also restrict it enough to control everything coming off the blade.

With a collector with the capacity of either my little or big Jet collectors, just having a hole large enough to allow the router to move up and down “may” be sufficient. The stiff nylon brush should push it over the edge.

A square box may work as well as an octagon.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#14 posted 04-13-2015 08:27 PM

@kelly

l really like the long brush hair idea. Thank you for the suggestion. May not have to use anything if I scribe the hole well. Even if my idea doesn’t work, it only cost me about $10 for the material and an hour of labor.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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