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Jointing wide boards method - how good are the results?

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 04-11-2015 09:29 PM 911 views 2 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

759 posts in 1462 days


04-11-2015 09:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer

I was pointed to a method to joint boards wider than your jointer by some other ‘Jocks. This is the method I am talking about:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=casDTQ0y60Y

For those of you using this method, how well does it work out? Good enough to make table tops without tons of scraping or sanding?

I’m agonizing over a jointer purchase. I really see the value in the width of an 8” jointer, but the more I look at it, the more afraid I am that I will be overbuying for the shop space I have. Wish someone made a 50” long 8” jointer…..

If I could get away with this method reliably, a nice 6” jointer would save me space and some money, even if I upgraded to a paralellogram or helix cutter. But if this method is just frustrating and hit or miss, I will take a harder look at rearranging things to get an 8” jointer in place.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


15 replies so far

View Shadowrider's profile

Shadowrider

183 posts in 677 days


#1 posted 04-11-2015 10:09 PM

I’ve been wondering the same thing myself. For me I think I can make this method work for the money and space savings. I’m pretty sure I’ll just get one of the Grizzly 6” jointers and be happy with the savings to buy a few more clamps.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1971 days


#2 posted 04-11-2015 11:11 PM

bb, do you make tabletops for a living?

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3349 days


#3 posted 04-12-2015 12:12 AM

Hey,
I have a Powermatic 6 inch jointer that I put a helical head in. I really like it, but an eight inch would be nice. I just could not justify the money back then. A lot of boards come a bit larger than six inches.

Anyway, I have used that technique a lot and it works ok. A bit of futzing around, but it works. Kind of scary without the blade guard installed. I use an L shaped wooden bracket that is clamped to the fence and hides the blade. The workpiece goes under it. I often use a long strip of six inch wide Masonite that I double sticky tape to the board for the leveler. You can reuse it a bunch of times before changing the tape.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View BorkBob's profile

BorkBob

124 posts in 2160 days


#4 posted 04-12-2015 12:17 AM

I have an 8” jointer and a 15” planer. I use the jointer to get the boards flat; they don’t have to be pretty.

For boards wider than my jointer, I joint with the cupped side down. I make a couple passes and turn the board end for end. A couple more passes and turn it again. I do this until the board shows “clean” down both outer edges which tells me the board will stay flat when planed. The raised strip in one edge doesn’t bother me. A couple or three passes through the planer and I flip the board and remove the raised strip.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 04-12-2015 12:21 AM

Brian, That is the method I use. The sandpaper (or a shallow cleat) on your sled is important to keep your workpiece from moving backwards off the sled. Quick and simple. Looking at those spinning blades with no guard is a little intimidating at first.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WillliamMSP's profile

WillliamMSP

764 posts in 1072 days


#6 posted 04-12-2015 12:34 AM

Since the method in question relies on a planer already, why not one of the planer sleds? (such as http://www.finewoodworking.com/workshop/video/a-planer-sled-for-milling-lumber.aspx)

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#7 posted 04-12-2015 12:39 AM

Bill, I have built a planer sled as well and the jointer method is a LOT quicker. I use my planer sled for stock that is too wide for the jointer method.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2534 days


#8 posted 04-12-2015 02:06 AM

That looks very interesting. Back in the days before I got my 12 inch planer, i used winding sticks and a hand plane. It was fast and worked like a charm

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#9 posted 04-12-2015 02:20 AM

Just get a bigger hand plane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Wl42bLPiCpA

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3349 days


#10 posted 04-12-2015 02:23 AM

Planer sleds work ok. Quite a lot of futzing to stabilize the board though. And you have to store a large sled. You can find a few on LJs.

Another way is to make a router sled that makes two grooves that will then hold two reference sticks for the ride through the planer.
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1992

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

759 posts in 1462 days


#11 posted 04-12-2015 01:41 PM

Thanks guys.

No, I am not a professional, but if its true that you can’t buy tools unless you need them for a living, then please delete this post before my wife sees it! I have a good thing going and don’t want to ruin it! :)

I have researched the planer sleds, but I just don’t see that as something I’m going to be happy with. Looks like a lot of tinkering, opportunities for stuff to move, etc. The rouer/slot method I looked at pretty hard too, but by the time you do that in a 4/4 board you may not have much left to work with once its all flat. As far as hand planes, well I have something of a Tim Taylor streak in me coupled with the inexplicable inability to sharpen anything.

I need to take a harder look in the shop and see if I can work the 8” jointer in there. I would really like it, but at least if it doesn’t fit it seems you can get good results with this method.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View BorkBob's profile

BorkBob

124 posts in 2160 days


#12 posted 04-12-2015 01:51 PM

My shop is only 20×20. I put my 8” jointer on a furniture dolly from Harbor Freight http://www.harborfreight.com/30-in-x-19-in-1000-lb-capacity-hardwood-dolly-60496.html

I’m tall so the added height actually helps my bad back. The jointer has its own tripod casters but this dolly allows me to move sideways to store the beast against the shop wall.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

759 posts in 1462 days


#13 posted 04-12-2015 02:00 PM

I actually just bought two of those to help me get the boxes from the curb up to my garage! There was a coupon in a magazine I had for $8.99 each so I figured what the heck. Hadn’t considered using them permanently!

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#14 posted 04-12-2015 02:07 PM

Tim covered this subject very well some time ago on LJs

http://lumberjocks.com/tenontim/blog/26637

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#15 posted 04-12-2015 03:10 PM

Those times I have to joint boards wider than my jointer, I do (sort of) what BorkBob suggested. I’ll go through the jointer, I usually set the fence to do just slightly more than 1/2 of the board. Then flip it end for end and do the other half. I don’t do this a lot, but the times I have it has worked very well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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