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Forum topic by CudaDude posted 04-10-2015 05:45 PM 831 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CudaDude

176 posts in 1772 days


04-10-2015 05:45 PM

Would like to get some input please.
8 years ago I purchased a Milwaukee Magnum 1/2 drill and I could count on both hands the times I’ve used it. Well last night bored a couple 1 1/4” holes in a 2×4 and was drilling 4 pocket holes when, on hole #2 the drill throws sparks and starts smoking and now has no power. Prior to this I used it a few times to mix a 5 gal bucket of paint and drill a few holes.
I emailed Milwaukee because I think a tool that’s supposed to be of that quality would hold up better than that. Here’s their response-

Gary, Thank you for contacting us about our product and we apologize for any problems you may be experiencing from your drill. In response to your e-mail below; This drill was manufactured in 2006, pushing 8 years and beyond our warranty perimeters and from what you are explaining we would not recommend running this tool to prevent any further damage.

Using this drill as a paint mixer has overloaded the tool causing stress to the motor burning it out. We would recommend sending it in for servicing to one of the Authorized Service Centers listed below. If we can be of any further service please let me know.

Rory Hatch – After-Sales Service — Technical Support

Serious??? Mixing paint a few times burned up the motor? I’ve mixed tile thinset mortar with a cheap 18v Ryobi that still works and this “Heavy Duty” drill burned up from mixing some latex? What’s your opinions? Does mixing paint with a drill overstress the motor?

-- Gary


12 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#1 posted 04-10-2015 05:54 PM

I have done the same with my 3/8 Milwaukee and a battery op drill. Mainly mud. No problems.

I would never give them ammo to use against you. Mixing paint is “not common usage” and they will revoke any chance to get this corrected.

Think of the company as a Judge and you have to present you case to them. Say only as much as needed. I say do this:
1. keep the drill
2. wait 6 months
3. send another email from a different acct at a public library
4. you used it 3 times in 8 years
5. end the email with “Do you know who I am?” Ok, dont do that.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1957 days


#2 posted 04-10-2015 06:14 PM

I have 3 (2-1/2”, 1-3/8”)of them, and 1 has been used to mix a lot of paint (never a 5 gallon bucket, tho’). But the Milwaukee of today is not your father’s Milwaukee, they have been bought out by a Chinese firm. Even so, I’m not sure what you were expecting. He simply offered his opinion that the paint was the problem (I also disagree with his assessment) and suggested service. I can’t imagine a much different response on any tool that old….regardless of how many times it’s been used. So I’m wondering what response you expected to receive? Personally, I would check for things I might be able to fix myself, if none it’s toast. If I was disappointed with the tool and/or company, I’d switch brands for the replacement. Just me…..

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View madts's profile

madts

1682 posts in 1804 days


#3 posted 04-10-2015 06:16 PM

Try taking the brushes out and clean them. I have had similar problems with 110 v tools that sat around.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View CudaDude's profile

CudaDude

176 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 04-10-2015 06:46 PM


I have 3 (2-1/2”, 1-3/8”)of them, and 1 has been used to mix a lot of paint (never a 5 gallon bucket, tho ). But the Milwaukee of today is not your father s Milwaukee, they have been bought out by a Chinese firm. Even so, I m not sure what you were expecting. He simply offered his opinion that the paint was the problem (I also disagree with his assessment) and suggested service. I can t imagine a much different response on any tool that old….regardless of how many times it s been used. So I m wondering what response you expected to receive? Personally, I would check for things I might be able to fix myself, if none it s toast. If I was disappointed with the tool and/or company, I d switch brands for the replacement. Just me…..

- Fred Hargis

I personally don’t think 8 years is very old for a supposed ‘quality tool’. What did I expect? How ‘bout some assistance. I work in retail and have many times approached the manufacturer on behalf of the consumer for things that are beyond warranty. When I think of quality, I think of something that will last a long time (without abuse) regardless of the warranty.

-- Gary

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#5 posted 04-10-2015 06:49 PM

I would not expect any thing out of the company for a tool thats 7 years out of warranty.
They have no way to know how long or how much the tool has been used. Other than what you told them.
And we all know that absolutely no one ever mis-represents what they did to a tool.

Thanks to all the Walmarts, Home Depots, and Lowes there exists the mentality in everyone that the only reason to buy anything is when it costs less than anything else. So any manufacturer who tried to build better quality had to re-align to build less expensively (cheaper).

I know there are a few people out there who want quality stuff. And there are a smaller few out there who will pay for it. For that smallest group, we have Festool. For the masses we have every tool company getting all their crap built by One World Tech, or what ever, in China. So, for us folks who would pay a little more but want good stuff, we are just SOOL.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1957 days


#6 posted 04-10-2015 06:50 PM

Well, they did offer assistance…send it in. No reason to expect they would offer a new drill, or free service. Regardless, I wish you the best with whatever choose to do….we can agree to disagree on the other stuff.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3555 posts in 2025 days


#7 posted 04-10-2015 07:09 PM

Cuda

This is my opinion

Although the excuse is lame the warranty is expired. It is not their fault you did not use it earlier to find out if it was bad. If you did and found out the same problem they would have fixed or replaced it.

I do commend you for telling the truth and hiding nothing so for this I give you a hand shake. :)

Arlin

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View devann's profile

devann

2201 posts in 2157 days


#8 posted 04-10-2015 08:35 PM

+1 what madts said. You may have to replace the brushes, sounds like one of them is not making a good connection. Probably broken at the spring/holder connection. That may or may not fix your drill, it could be something more serious has caused permanent damage. But I have seen sparks coming from mine and soldering the broken brush wire back where it came from fixed mine.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#9 posted 04-10-2015 08:43 PM

I’ve seen this happen to well over 100 of those drills. The drill itself is fairly robust, but the armature and field coil are prone to overheating if bogged down and airflow from the cooling fan isn’t as fast as it should be. These work great and last forever until overloaded then both the armature and field are toast. It’s about $45 or so in parts + labor. Mixing mud is best reserved for one of their compact drills (not really that compact) or a hole hawg, both which have substantially more torque than the 1/2” Magnum drill. If you have to mix mud with it, don’t use over a 4” paddle or you’ll toast it pretty quick. The reason your getting sparks throw from the commutator is either an open or short in the armature, messing with the brushes unfortunately will not fix the problem.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#10 posted 04-10-2015 08:45 PM

The response was reasonable given the age of the tool, not knowing what it’s been through over the years, and inability to diagnose the problem given the description (needs to be sitting in front of you for proper diagnosis). Open it up and see what the problem is. Could be as simple as a brush that wore down to the point of being spit out, or a bearing that has gone south and needs replacing. I would never consider calling the manufacturer for a problem like that, unless it was only a couple months old – and then I still wouldn’t call them; I’d take it back to where I bought it and demand a replacement.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#11 posted 04-10-2015 08:50 PM

Another thing I forgot to mention, when Milwaukee sold out (I think to TTI) the quality of the tools and customer service both took a huge dive. It’s more about making tools look neater than perform better, especially in longevity.

View CudaDude's profile

CudaDude

176 posts in 1772 days


#12 posted 04-11-2015 03:28 AM

Thanks for the input. As long as it’s not cost prohibitive, I’ll get it fixed. It wasn’t cheap and I’d sure like to get some more use out of it. Hope my other Milwaukee tools hold up better than the drill did.

-- Gary

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