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My walnut table

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Forum topic by Thickwood posted 04-09-2015 03:29 PM 882 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thickwood

3 posts in 612 days


04-09-2015 03:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut

I have a beautiful slab of walnut I am making into a table. I have read page after page of different ways to finish it making its natural beauty show but also durable for some daily use. So I am wondering if Simone can point me in the right direction on what to do with this table.


11 replies so far

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2629 days


#1 posted 04-09-2015 03:35 PM

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helluvawreck

23216 posts in 2334 days


#2 posted 04-09-2015 03:42 PM

It’s very nice and out of beautiful wood.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2629 days


#3 posted 04-09-2015 03:56 PM

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1910 days


#4 posted 04-09-2015 06:03 PM

Thickwood – great looking piece of Walnut! Timberwerks, I’ve seen your stuff before and I am impressed. Question, what is better about Liberon than getting some pure Tung and mixing it with another product (other than convenience)? Liberon is big bucks and I read Liberon is mostly Tung. Both are pricey but Liberon is more than pure Tung. Thanks

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2629 days


#5 posted 04-09-2015 06:21 PM

I used to mix my own blends but I did switch due to the convenience & I can also show clients or buyers what I have used for the finish by pointing them to the website etc. This way they can read reviews, know about their finish & how to take care of it. Also, if the finish ever did fail I have one source to go to vs the maker of the tung oil, varnish etc. The cost is built into the quote or final price.

I also use Tried & True varnish oil on some pieces, it all depends on the piece & how it will be used: http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/products/varnish-oil/

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1910 days


#6 posted 04-09-2015 07:52 PM

Thanks!

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

387 posts in 732 days


#7 posted 04-09-2015 08:22 PM

This is absolutely gorgeous. I have come back to the picture about 4 times now. I love the base too. Do you have pictures of the entire base?

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

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Caleone

28 posts in 997 days


#8 posted 04-09-2015 11:34 PM

Randy, great table. What is your base made out of? Finishing is one of those things where there is no shortage of opinion, or of product. Some people LOOOOVE to finish, and invest big $$ in premium products, spray rigs, and dedicated space to the finishing process. My first woodworking teacher/mentor got his woodworking education from the North Bennett School, and had been making fine furniture for 30+ years. He led me through the process of making a tabletop ‘tansu’ made of mahogany, with handcut dovetails and through tenons. While I sucked at doing those things, the completed project looked great in spite of my beginner’s skills. When I asked him how I should finish it, he said “I put wipe-on poly on everything. I hate finishing. ’ That was a decade-ish ago, and every time I complete a project I recall what he said. A couple replies were about making your own blends, but at basis if you are blending oil, varnish, and mineral spirits, you are making Watco Danish Oil. I use the Watco, I can buy a pint of it without having to drive 10+ miles, cover a large project or a bunch of small ones, and not give shop space to storing finishes and mixing containers. Likewise with the oil-based polyurethane. I put on one application of Danish Oil according to packaging directions, and clean and hand-buff after 72+ hours; this gives the surfaces a nice ‘hand.’ Then I put on two coats of gloss oil-based poly, including the live/natural edges. I think the gloss gives the surfaces life and depth, and makes the finish coats go on easier. I finish with 1-3 applications of satin poly of the same brand and variety, but only one of those goes on the edges—natural edges can be hard to smooth and polish without taking out the ‘hill and swale’ of the natural-ness, and finishing them this way seems to compensate for any “roughness” left over. I complete the surface finishing with a light buffing using a high ‘grit’ microfiber pad (6000-8000) on a dedicated (i.e., cheap) ROS, and a good cleaning of any dust. I am sure posters might take issue with my ‘out of the can’ approach to finishing, but it takes 5 – 10 days to create a nice finish, regardless, and adding chasing and mixing and storing to the process doesn’t make sense to me, as I am doing this in my free time already. I have things in my home ten years old now that get hard use and were finished this way, and they are holding up nicely and still look good.

-- Caleone, Sammamish, WA

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#9 posted 04-10-2015 12:18 AM

I like to “wet sand” with BLO to fill the open grain somewhat and then use a wiped on Spar Urethane/MS mix (2:1 ratio). I do this on walnut but not other woods.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Thickwood

3 posts in 612 days


#10 posted 04-10-2015 02:02 AM

Thank you everyone for the advice and compliments it’s very helpful and encouraging to make more beautiful funature. Phillip I will be back to the shop tomorrow and can post some pictures of the base without the top. The base was made out of cedar and notched and will be fastened together just like old timber barn framing with pegs

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Thickwood

3 posts in 612 days


#11 posted 04-11-2015 06:27 PM

Here is the base without the top on it

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