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File/Rasp choice?

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Forum topic by Julius Jahn posted 04-09-2015 01:54 PM 1145 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


04-09-2015 01:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question

Well, it’s time for me to upgrade from my Grobet 4in1 file and get some dedicated carving tools. There doesn’t seem to be a set standard on the cut of a smooth, bastard, and second and it seems to vary among the files Im interested in. I’d like to get one rough, one smooth 1/2 round files and keep it under 40$ for the two.

So far, Ive been looking at these.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,42524&p=20133

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,42524&p=30287

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,42524&p=56529

I like the idea of the nicholson one, since I do a lot of figured and tough wood (flamed maple, wenge, rosewood) but not sure how much material it can remove. I usually start with a square stock but can start to cut off more waste with the bandsaw first.

So, any opinions? Anything is appreciated!

-- Luthier from NS, Canada


15 replies so far

View Jeff C's profile

Jeff C

6 posts in 642 days


#1 posted 04-09-2015 02:57 PM

Luthier – do you have the Shinto rasp in your arsenal? I have used it for years and it is great for roughing shapes on even tough wood. Here’s a link to a nice description and they are still pretty inexpensive (I do recommend the handle).

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/the-venerable-and-inscrutable-shinto-rasp

-- Jeff C, Wylie, TX

View Julius Jahn's profile

Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


#2 posted 04-09-2015 02:58 PM

Yea, of course I do! I find it likes to twist on me these days, plus its flat cutting shape does not work where I actually need to file away.

-- Luthier from NS, Canada

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1147 days


#3 posted 04-09-2015 03:04 PM

The difference between the finish and cutting speed between a hand cut rasp and a file is hard to describe. The random pattern of the teeth make them work much better than the machine cut teeth of the cheaper versions. I know your budget won’t let you get even one hand cut rasp but personally I think you would be better off saving up for one modelers or cabinet makers hand cut rasp over buying a bunch of machine cut files.

If you have not already check out Tools for Working wood. They have a bunch of files and rasps both hand cut and machine cut for sale.

View Julius Jahn's profile

Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


#4 posted 04-09-2015 03:09 PM

I only have to file points A and B on my guitars, then connect the dots with my spokeshave, so spending 200$ on a dragon rasp is not a priority. I can do with the 15$ Grobet, but would like longer strokes and a real handle.

-- Luthier from NS, Canada

View R_Stad's profile

R_Stad

374 posts in 1310 days


#5 posted 04-09-2015 03:27 PM

Hello Julius. I have to agree with Richard H. I use some Liogier hand cut rasps. The price almost chased me away until I had read the wisdom of people who use rasps extensively. I have a 9 and 13 grain half round sapphire and will be getting a 15 soon. They remove wood quickly and under great control. Watch the video of how they are made and you’ll think it’s a bargain. I think shipping was $15 from France. Noel was great to deal with. Just my 2 cents. Best of luck with your luthiery.

http://www.liogier-france.fr/woodworking?lang=en

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ09O3d8y9Q&feature=youtu.be

-- Rod - Oregon

View Julius Jahn's profile

Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


#6 posted 04-09-2015 03:37 PM

Yea, well it’s not something I can swing right now. Im building a workshop in the summer so this is the last purchase until that’s built. I can get 80% of the efficiency at 10% of the cost for right now from one of the LeeV ones (which is also hand cut).

-- Luthier from NS, Canada

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#7 posted 04-09-2015 04:04 PM



I only have to file points A and B on my guitars, then connect the dots with my spokeshave, so spending 200$ on a dragon rasp is not a priority. I can do with the 15$ Grobet, but would like longer strokes and a real handle.

- Julius Jahn

If that’s the case Julius why not just sand the points with a Random orbital sander ?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1141 days


#8 posted 04-09-2015 11:01 PM

You must know about these Dragon rasps from stewmac. Hand cut. I have large and small coarse ones. For a fine cut I don’t use as much pressure. The marks are scraped away without much effort..

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Types_of_Tools/Files/Dragon_Hand-cut_Rasp.html

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

550 posts in 2465 days


#9 posted 04-09-2015 11:28 PM

Bill,

Do you think the Dragon raps would be suitable for saw handle making?

Greg

View Julius Jahn's profile

Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


#10 posted 04-10-2015 12:21 AM


If that s the case Julius why not just sand the points with a Random orbital sander ?
- a1Jim

ROS is way too big for what im doing. Only need to do 2-3” and then spokeshave the rest. Also does not work well on the volute.


- Texcaster

Trying to stay away from Screwmac and they seem a bit pricey for what im in the market right now. Add in 20% customs, and a 35$ shipping fee and I could almost get a lougier instead :P

-- Luthier from NS, Canada

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1141 days


#11 posted 04-10-2015 12:24 AM



Bill,

Do you think the Dragon raps would be suitable for saw handle making?

Greg

- Greg In Maryland

Greg, yes these rasps have a very useful shape. Flat and round, broad at tang, very fine at the point.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1402 days


#12 posted 04-10-2015 12:32 AM

I had some iwasaki rasps similar to the nicholson ones. I didn’t like them because they cut too fast and were picky about grain. They are really more like cheese graters than files, which is useful for some things, but not the things I wanted to do with them.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View Julius Jahn's profile

Julius Jahn

12 posts in 618 days


#13 posted 04-10-2015 12:37 AM



I had some iwasaki rasps similar to the nicholson ones. I didn t like them because they cut too fast and were picky about grain. They are really more like cheese graters than files, which is useful for some things, but not the things I wanted to do with them.

- TheWoodenOyster

These ones?

I might just buy a rough rasp first, since thats 90% of the work and I can smooth with the 4in1.

-- Luthier from NS, Canada

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#14 posted 04-10-2015 01:38 AM

I picked up an Auriou rasp in the secondary market and paid

90.00 for it and it’s worth the money as it works well.

Now, they’re around 138.00 on Lee Valley’s site and worth the premium YMMV.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1147 days


#15 posted 04-10-2015 03:17 AM



Bill,

Do you think the Dragon raps would be suitable for saw handle making?

Greg

- Greg In Maryland

I picked up one of these after taking a class on making back saws. https://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/dept/TRR/item/GT-SHRASP.XX

Great for getting the inside of the handle to shape and is actually pretty useful for a lot of places on curved pieces.

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