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Building a non-square door

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Forum topic by CB_Cohick posted 04-08-2015 02:49 PM 941 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


04-08-2015 02:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining door non-square

I am nearing the finish line on building a knockoff of Norm’s ultimate router table. I need to build the door with the acrylic pane that closes off the router/dust chamber. The problem I face is that I have hosed up the opening somewhere in the process and it is not square. It is 1/4” wider at the bottom than the top. How to proceed? I am using red oak for the door frame. The plans call for 7/8” x 3/4” stiles and rails, mitered at the corners, with a 1/8” groove to hold the door pane. Should I try to figure out the odd angles required and build it to fit the space? Should I build it square, thus simplifying cutting the acrylic pane, and plane down the corner that is going to be out of square? Other ideas? How would I go about figuring out the odd angles if I need to go that route? All input is appreciated. Here is a photo of the project as it is this morning showing the cabinet space I need a wonky door built for.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.


11 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#1 posted 04-08-2015 03:03 PM

How do those drawers still fit right if the opening between them isn’t square?

To figure out the angles, you could always got an angle guide at the hardware store for about $5. Then copy that angle to your work pieces.

-Brian

That is a pretty killer router table, BTW. Wonky door and all.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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NoThanks

798 posts in 990 days


#2 posted 04-08-2015 03:14 PM

Build your door square, but bigger using wider stiles and rails, then trim it to your angles needed.

Your seams won’t come to point, if you’re willing to make that sacrifice,
otherwise make a mach up of the door out of some scrap wood, then
draw in the stiles and rails and measure the angles at each corner.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#3 posted 04-08-2015 03:25 PM

Change from mitered corners to stub tenon & groove, then build over sized and trim to fit. The corners won’t look “buggered” up as Iwud4u points out with the stub tenon & groove.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


#4 posted 04-08-2015 04:36 PM

Awesome! Thanks for the input.


To figure out the angles, you could always got an angle guide at the hardware store for about $5. Then copy that angle to your work pieces.

-Brian

- bbasiaga


Ahh, just what I need. An excuse to go to the store and pick up a tool!


Build your door square, but bigger using wider stiles and rails, then trim it to your angles needed.

- Iwud4u


Great idea. Thanks.


Change from mitered corners to stub tenon & groove, then build over sized and trim to fit. The corners won t look “buggered” up as Iwud4u points out with the stub tenon & groove.

- hotbyte


I really like this. I was concerned about the mitered corners from a strength standpoint before I discovered the out of square issue. Also, it gives me a chance to learn something new. In case another noob is wondering about stub tenons, I found this helpful article.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#5 posted 04-08-2015 05:18 PM

It isn’t hard to build out of square doors….I do it all the time! But on the odd occasion I do build one square, (if it doesn’t need to be) make it larger and cut it down.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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taoist

120 posts in 1952 days


#6 posted 04-08-2015 05:35 PM

You could also take the router lift out and stick your hand and a pencil down the hole while holding a piece of cardboard where the door goes and trace the outline. That would seem the easiest to me.

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


#7 posted 04-08-2015 05:58 PM



You could also take the router lift out and stick your hand and a pencil down the hole while holding a piece of cardboard where the door goes and trace the outline. That would seem the easiest to me.

- taoist

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


#8 posted 04-08-2015 06:27 PM



It isn t hard to build out of square doors….I do it all the time! But on the odd occasion I do build one square, (if it doesn t need to be) make it larger and cut it down.

- Fred Hargis

Glad to hear I’m in good company :-D

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


#9 posted 04-10-2015 12:53 PM

I decided to go with a hybrid of the suggestions in this thread. I am using bigger stock for the door frame, 3/4” x 1 1/2”. I am building it square, and will cut it down to size using a cardboard template created as suggested by u\taoist. I went ahead and mitered the corners, but with the extra real estate I plan to dowel the corners together. Thanks for the input everyone. I will take a picture and post it once I get ‘er all together. The acrylic I got for the door was only 3/32” thick, so I ended up getting a slotting bit for the router to create that groove rather than having it flop around in a 1/8” groove.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1571 days


#10 posted 04-10-2015 02:27 PM

Use an overlay door… ;^)

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#11 posted 04-10-2015 02:34 PM

I guess you are OK with how the miter joint will look once the outside edges of door are trimmed? The joint “line” or seam that should run from inside corner to outside corner will not end on the outside corner. Depending on how you have to trim door, it will end along either the top or side edge. This will also expose end grain of one piece. Draw a mitered mock-up on paper and then draw a line to represent wood you will be trimming away.

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