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Disassembly of Delta Milwaukee CBL402 Tailstock (1640 Lathe)

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Forum topic by Jeff C posted 04-08-2015 03:21 AM 963 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeff C

6 posts in 634 days


04-08-2015 03:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: delta 1460 cbl402 tailstock

I have scoured the threads and cannot find exactly what I am looking for:

Just purchased a Delta Milwaukee 1460 Lathe – cannot date because the bed is a welded set of channels – however, head and tailstock are both marked. Tailstock is CBL402 and is “old style”.

Here’s the question: How do I remove the cap that sits in front of the ball cap? I have the diagram but cannot tell if it is threaded or a press fit? I would like to know before I screw anything up :). BTW, have already replaced the headstock bearings and have a VFD motor coming!

Pic of cap attached

-- Jeff C, Wylie, TX


7 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 04-08-2015 03:30 AM

It unscrews… remove the crank handle first and then use a vice to get it off. Note – It’s a right hand thread! Wrap with leather or something similar to keep it from getting buggered up (see instructions). Here are some instructions for performing a tailstock mod that includes disassembly instructions:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1141/2369.pdf

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I’ve never seen a Delta lathe (or any for that matter) where the end cap was a press fit… all are either threaded or held in with spring pins or clips of some sort.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1881 posts in 1594 days


#2 posted 04-08-2015 11:25 AM

Nice info and save Brad! Would squirt some oil or penetraing fluid first?

-- Bill

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Jeff C

6 posts in 634 days


#3 posted 04-08-2015 12:55 PM

Brad – thanks much – the pdf is more detailed than others I had found – dang nice to know it is RH thread, otherwise I might have been up a creek! Bill, I have been squirting a little WD-40 every few days before I go removing anything. If it is still tight, I’ll step it up a notch.

-- Jeff C, Wylie, TX

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Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2545 days


#4 posted 04-08-2015 04:09 PM

Thank you for the info MrUnix, I did not have that in the file on my lathe, now I will go out and try this
out.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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JoeinGa

7472 posts in 1466 days


#5 posted 04-09-2015 12:18 AM

THIS stuff is WAY better than WD40. Every shop should have a can. You can buy it at the big box stores, auto supply house, and I think even WallyWorld has it.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Jeff C's profile

Jeff C

6 posts in 634 days


#6 posted 04-09-2015 12:19 AM

Brad – ended up having to put it in vice (protected, of course), but a few gentle taps using the mass of the body and the threads easily disengaged.

-- Jeff C, Wylie, TX

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#7 posted 04-09-2015 12:44 AM

Brad – ended up having to put it in vice (protected, of course), but a few gentle taps using the mass of the body and the threads easily disengaged.

- jcourtma

Good deal! They usually aren’t too difficult to get off since they should only be hand tight, but sometimes you gotta give it a little more persuasion due to age and rust/corrosion.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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