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few saw blade questions

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Forum topic by AAANDRRREW posted 04-06-2015 11:44 PM 671 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AAANDRRREW

118 posts in 640 days


04-06-2015 11:44 PM

Hi all. Pretty new to the woodworking gig. I just got the Delta 36-725 saw from Lowes and have really liked it thus far. I do have a couple blade questions though – I know there is blade info from A to ZZ, but I just have two pointed questions.

1. I bought an 80T Irwin Marples blade – Most of my work will be either plywood or 1xsomething oak/birch/maple etc. I’d say about equal cross cuts vs rips. Now the 80T bladed did boast about great cross cutting, I’m worried if I use it to rip alot it will decrease the life of the blade. Now if I’m just the weekend warrior and dabble here and there, maybe its not a big deal – but I’m wondering if I should grab a 40T or less blade for ripping to make it easier on my saw and 80T blade. (now, the blade was $55… I’m a tightwad, but not THAT tight. if the blade lasts me a couple years or a TV stand, bookshelf, desk and shelving unit I’ll be fine).

2. I used my Craftsman pro 15 amp circular saw and the Kreg rip kit fence thingy to rip my 4×8 sheet of ply the other day. No clue what blade came with the saw (its brand new) but I noticed the rip wasn’t as pretty as my 80T one (no kidding, eh?). Can someone recommend a 7 1/4 blade that is better at rip cuts but also won’t have a problem with the occasional 2×4 stud? All i seem to find in the 7 1/4 range at the big box and hardware stores are constuction ones, nothing a little better.

3. Also, i have the 10” Hitachi non-sliding miter saw, and absolutley love it. I think it has a 24T blade in it and from what I can see cuts amazing. If I use this mainly for 1xwhatevers for face frames and the occasional 2×4, is a 24T blade ok? I kind of thought I’d need a better one for the hard woods…

Thanks,
Andy


8 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#1 posted 04-06-2015 11:59 PM

Freud Diablo has some good readily available blades.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rob's profile

Rob

704 posts in 2538 days


#2 posted 04-07-2015 12:17 AM

The danger in using a crosscut blade for rip cuts is that the gullets aren’t deep enough to remove all the sawdust on a deep cut, causing the blade to wander, burn the wood, and bind. If you’re only making shallow cuts on 3/4” and thinner material, you’ll probably be fine.

Regardless of what saw you’re using, get a decent carbide-tipped blade. Freud makes some good circular saw blades. I have a Freud 60T 7-1/4” blade on my circular saw and it works great on plywood and for crosscutting 2×4s. It would be an understatement to say it’s an enormous improvement over the POS Skil-branded steel-toothed 24T and plywood blades that I originally bought with the saw.

Usually you would go with more teeth for a crosscut or plywood blade and fewer teeth for a (solid wood) rip blade. If you’re happy with the 24T blade on your miter saw, don’t worry about it right now. When it starts to dull, you can buy a better or more appropriate blade.

-- Ask an expert or be the expert - http://woodworking.stackexchange.com

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#3 posted 04-07-2015 12:21 AM

I’ve used Freud and some others but I got a Forrest WW2 for Christmas and it is pure awesomeness.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1818 days


#4 posted 04-07-2015 01:28 AM

Get a Freud Diablo glue line rip blade for the table saw. Ripping will be much easier, especially w/ a thin kerf blade. Blades dull with use, the 80 tooth blade will dull faster if you use it for rip cuts, something it is ill suited for. If you are going to use the circular saw to break down plywood get a plywood blade. Most saws come w/ junk blades so save that for cutting through nails or old roofing.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

844 posts in 2443 days


#5 posted 04-07-2015 01:37 AM

Started first project with a new Delta 36-725 this weekend. So far, I really like the saw. I’m used an Irwin Marples 24T for ripping 5/4 and 8/4 with no issue. I already had a Freud 40T combo and it works great for crosscuts. I’d think 80T is just many teeth for a combo use.

For breaking down sheet goods with the circular saw, I just use a construction blade and cut pieces oversize being sure to leave a factory edge I can use to cut to final size on table saw. I usually don’t cut every piece out with circular saw, just enough to finish breakdown on table saw.

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1744 days


#6 posted 04-07-2015 01:45 AM

knotscott is Lumberjock’s guru on saw blades. Here’s his blogs for some informative reading

http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/36699

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

118 posts in 640 days


#7 posted 04-07-2015 01:51 PM

Thanks guys.

Something I’m struggling with. I understand the cross/rip cut for solid wood and what blades work better for each, but plywood is alternating layers, yes? Now the veneer goes lengthwise with the wood, but that is a paper thin sheet (just ask my sander, right?). Does a cross cut or rip cut really apply to plywood in terms of which blade you can use or not use? I understand if you use a rip blade to cross cut ply you’ll get more chip out, but using a cross cut blade for ripping ply really apply here?

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bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1818 days


#8 posted 04-07-2015 02:04 PM

Does a cross cut or rip cut really apply to plywood in terms of which blade you can use or not use?

No it does not. There are blades specifically designed for plywood that work best in that material. There are also 50 tooth combination blades that you can use for just about any wood working including cross cut, ripping and plywood. It is a compromise but it saves you from having to change blades frequently. I pretty much stick w/ the Freud line of blades but all manufacturers make combination and plywood blades.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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