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Identifying and Dating Great-Grandpa's Hand Planes

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Forum topic by NicHartman posted 04-06-2015 04:57 AM 1232 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


04-06-2015 04:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand plane identification help restoration plane refurbishing

Hey guys, I’m new here, and basically created this account for this reason alone. I want some help to identify some hand planes owned by my Great-Grandfather. Well, less identify and more categorize and give me a range of when they were bought and used. For what reason you ask? Why, my good sir, I shall tell you. I’m a young aspiring woodworker who comes from a family of working class men, and I felt this would be an appropriate route. Anyways, here they are.

I’m really sorry if that inconveniences you, with the link and all. At least if it ends up like that. (Like I said, new at this) If not, continue.
The Number 4

The Number 40

Now I don’t claim to be a professional photographer, but I hope these pictures will get the point across
Details of the #40



Details of the #4



(If you can’t read this one, it says No. 4 on top and Bailey on bottom

Patent dates

Alright, that’s all I’ve got for now. Ask for more detail if you can use it, I can take pictures of specific parts, follow your instructions whatever it needs. My goal here is to fully restore these two, wether it be for my own pride or for general use. However, I would also like to know if it makes sense to restore these, and if they’ll be suitable for use after I inevitably mess something up.
In conclusion: I would like to know when they were made, how useful it would be for me to restore them (No, not to sell, these are my inheritance as far as I’m concerned), and how to restore them if the former is wise. Any links or recommendations of good sources will be appreciated. Thank you for at least reading this far, and considering my request. Hopefully you’re a plane aficionado with extra time on his hands ;).


35 replies so far

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#1 posted 04-06-2015 12:17 PM

One is a scrub plane (No. 40)

The other looks like an early No. 4 because of the patent dates, but also because it doesn’t have an adjustable frog.
I had a grooved bottom No. 4 exactly like this an it was a decent plane once I tuned it up.

Try this site for more exact identification.
This is also a good site for “all things Stanley”.

I would say due to the provenance and attachment you have, you should restore the planes to their “former glory”.
They will both be users, however you will find as your skills increase, having and adjustable frog is a big advantage.

Good Luck.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2085 days


#2 posted 04-06-2015 01:04 PM

I think the #4 does have an adjustable frog, it’s visible in a couple of the pics.

Nic, you’ve got a great pair of planes to work with. Lots of resources on line to advise you on refurb, from cleaning to total repainting and shining. And it’s up to you how much you want to do with these tools. For my .02, I’d suggest a can of WD-40 and a stiff brush, along with some rags and elbow grease, as a first step. Learn how to take these apart and re-assemble, and clean everything. I personally wouldn’t be concerned with shine, just get the muck gone. Then sharpen the irons and go to town.

There are a bunch of #5 jack planes on the market that are in the same era as your tools; a jack with help complete the set, along with a longer jointer (#7 or #8). At that point you’d have a great working collection of g-grandpa-era hand tools.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#3 posted 04-06-2015 01:43 PM

You don’t need to worry about me learning to take them apart, I’ve already done it peobably a few more times than I should have ;). Thanks for the response, I’ll be checking those sources.

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#4 posted 04-06-2015 03:15 PM

Small update: the No. 4 is a 1910-1918 model, and the No. 40 is a lot harder to date, so for now I’m just gonna roll ahead with restoration. Currently researching the proper way to do it.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#5 posted 04-06-2015 03:33 PM

I think the #4 does have an adjustable frog, it’s visible in a couple of the pics.

I stand corrected!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#6 posted 04-06-2015 03:41 PM

Alright, what does the adjustable frog thing mean exactly? I apologize for my obliviousness, but the frog is held down by two bolts from the top that fit into elongated holes, and in the back bottom side of the bed theres an adjustment screw that pushes the whole frog forward or back. I feel as if I’m still dating this wrong, somehow.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#7 posted 04-06-2015 04:04 PM

It means it has a screw and fork to move it so the mouth can be made smaller.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#8 posted 04-06-2015 04:28 PM

Yep, it does have that. So does that take it out of the 1910-1918 era, or am I mistaken?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#9 posted 04-06-2015 04:34 PM

Look at this

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/

Edit here

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/dating_flowchart_ascii.php

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View NicHartman's profile

NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#10 posted 04-06-2015 05:14 PM

It seems to be a type 11, which is one of the more desirable ones if what I’ve read is correct. About to go out and get some rust removal items.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#11 posted 04-06-2015 05:20 PM

I thinks it’s a type 12. I picked a #5 type 11 on Saturday and the only difference, from the chart, is that the type 12 has a larger (1-1/2”) depth adjustment nut.

Not to mention I think I see a heart on the iron. type 12 was the start of the sweetheart era and are supposed to be the peak of quality for Stanley plane. Or something like that. Very desirable plane at least. Clean the top of the iron and measure the depth adjuster and it will tell you all you need to know. Pretty sure.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

4785 posts in 1677 days


#12 posted 04-06-2015 05:42 PM

I would agree with type 11. It has the low knob and looks like a small adjusting nut.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#13 posted 04-06-2015 05:51 PM

The diameter of the nut is around 3/4-1” if I remember right. I could only wish for a Sweetheart. Besides, it does have the bailey marking on the front of the bed, if that happens to make any difference.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#14 posted 04-06-2015 05:53 PM

I see the small nut. Still a solid plane.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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NicHartman

53 posts in 613 days


#15 posted 04-06-2015 05:56 PM

Anyways, I’m currently putting all the little bolts on a rust removal spray and seeing where that takes me. How should I remove the tarnish on the brass?

showing 1 through 15 of 35 replies

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