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Forum topic by Woodpecker23 posted 04-06-2015 04:06 AM 2441 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Woodpecker23

64 posts in 634 days


04-06-2015 04:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig

I am working on a project where I need multiple fairly large circles cut. I have been doing some looking around and found many different ways to cut perfect circle such as with a table saw band saw and router. I am actually curious if there is anyone out there that has a good plan or pictures of a homemade jig for cutting circles with a jig saw. I’m just weighing all of my options before I go ahead with the project. Thanks for any advice

-- measure once, cut twice...swear repeatedly


17 replies so far

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 04-06-2015 04:26 AM

If your jig saw has the ability to use an edge guide, just use that to mount a rod with a pin on the end.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Some edge guides can also be used for cutting circles… similar to those used with a router.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#2 posted 04-07-2015 03:09 AM

All you need to do is get a strip of 1/4” ply equal to the diameter of your router base. Get the biggest diameter template guide that’ll fit your router base then cut that circle out of the ply. You can set any bit in it that’ll slip past without contact. If you intend on only using straight bits you don’t need the screw holes.

-- I meant to do that!

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#3 posted 04-07-2015 03:13 AM

All you need to do is get a strip of 1/4” ply equal to the diameter of your router base

Works great for a router… but the OP asked about doing it with a jig saw :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Jake

850 posts in 1090 days


#4 posted 04-07-2015 08:23 AM

All you need to do is get a strip of 1/4” ply equal to the diameter of your router base

Works great for a router… but the OP asked about doing it with a jig saw :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Still works on the same principle. But instead of fastening the base with screws, most jigsaws don’t have that option, so just slap double sided tape on it and call it a day.

Most difficult is to get it started, cause you can’t plunge a jigsaw in like a router, so you need to get the width of your blade on the line. Then just start the jigsaw and let ‘er rip

EDIT: By the way, this is literally the first picture that turns up when you google “Jigsaw circle cutting jig”

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

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Yonak

979 posts in 980 days


#5 posted 04-07-2015 06:30 PM

I normally rough cut with a jigsaw or band saw and have a jig to make it round and smooth with the disk sander. If a center hole is OK, it makes it easier to make the jig but, even if not, jig options are possible.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#6 posted 04-08-2015 12:09 AM

Yeah I’m a douche! But as Jake points out the premise is the same yeah.

-- I meant to do that!

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waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#7 posted 04-08-2015 12:29 AM

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bigblockyeti

3663 posts in 1180 days


#8 posted 04-08-2015 12:31 AM

What kind of surface finish are you looking for on the cut edge? You can get some pretty clean cutting jig saw blades, but you’re likely to be able to do even better with a router, especially if you use a compression bit.

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Woodpecker23

64 posts in 634 days


#9 posted 04-08-2015 12:48 AM



What kind of surface finish are you looking for on the cut edge? You can get some pretty clean cutting jig saw blades, but you re likely to be able to do even better with a router, especially if you use a compression bit.

- bigblockyeti

Im looking for a pretty close to finished edge when im done. This is the first time I will be cutting multiple circles of the same diameter. I have watched a lot of videos on cutting them with the table saw also but looks extremely time consuming, where the router way looks to be a little more efficient and quicker

-- measure once, cut twice...swear repeatedly

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#10 posted 04-08-2015 12:57 AM

Given the choice between a jig saw, band saw, table saw or router… the router is usually the easiest. But it depends on how thick and what type of material you will be cutting and how big the panels are that you are cutting them out of. Big panels are hard to do on the band saw, and thick stuff usually will require multiple passes with a router unless you rough cut them first (usually with a jig saw). Don’t think I would want to attempt doing circles on a table saw… just seems to awkward and potentially dangerous IMHO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Woodpecker23

64 posts in 634 days


#11 posted 04-08-2015 01:13 AM



Given the choice between a jig saw, band saw, table saw or router… the router is usually the easiest. But it depends on how thick and what type of material you will be cutting and how big the panels are that you are cutting them out of. Big panels are hard to do on the band saw, and thick stuff usually will require multiple passes with a router unless you rough cut them first (usually with a jig saw). Don t think I would want to attempt doing circles on a table saw… just seems to awkward and potentially dangerous IMHO.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I totally agree with the table saw and the safety issue there…. I like my fingers! As my plan sits now I will be 1/2 inch thick material, not sure on the actual type of material yet. I am making a round display stand with 5 levels and need a finished edge but im not a huge fan of laminate edging… im going through options there as well

-- measure once, cut twice...swear repeatedly

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#12 posted 04-08-2015 02:17 AM

If you are making a display stand, it might be better to use a circle template with the router to avoid a hole in the middle (for the pivot point). Guess it depends on the diameter of the stand though. There are lots of ways to accomplish the same task, so you just gotta figure out which one works best for you and the project.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#13 posted 04-08-2015 02:36 AM



Given the choice between a jig saw, band saw, table saw or router… the router is usually the easiest.
Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

And, the router will give you the cleanest cut.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Mykos

102 posts in 1254 days


#14 posted 04-08-2015 03:39 AM

You can use a pin through a block stuck to the plywood with carpet tape to avoid the hole in the middle. I use one with my router trammel. For 1/2” material I’d go straight for the router. It makes nice clean edges.

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Woodpecker23

64 posts in 634 days


#15 posted 04-08-2015 03:56 AM



You can use a pin through a block stuck to the plywood with carpet tape to avoid the hole in the middle. I use one with my router trammel. For 1/2” material I d go straight for the router. It makes nice clean edges.

- Mykos


So do u normally rough cut first and just use the router to finish up or cut straight through the stock right from the get go

-- measure once, cut twice...swear repeatedly

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