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Evaporust question

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Forum topic by Furnitude posted 04-04-2015 09:34 PM 1339 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Furnitude

373 posts in 2974 days


04-04-2015 09:34 PM

I wanted to clean up a Hock blade and chipbreaker so I soaked them in Evaporust for a couple days. When I took them out, they had a black color almost all over them. Can anyone suggest how to get this off? Would i have to use steel wool or something? any suggestions appreciated. thanks, Mitch

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/


9 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4241 posts in 1665 days


#1 posted 04-04-2015 09:46 PM

Comes right off with a scotch-brite pad.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: As per the instructions, you need to wash the part after removing from evaporust. That is the best time to hit it with the scotch-brite.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#2 posted 04-04-2015 11:29 PM

Scotch-brite pad like brad suggested or very gently with a wire wheel.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7708 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 04-05-2015 01:07 AM

Dip in vinegar next time. Might be less expensive. Maybe some baking soda to neutralize it?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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OSU55

1063 posts in 1456 days


#4 posted 04-05-2015 01:45 AM

Its the red oxide, rust FeO3, turned into black oxide, FeO2. Scotchbrite or steel wool will take it off. I usually look at my parts in Evaporust every couple of hours, and sometimes give them a light rub down to expose fresh rust to the evaporust. Unless very rusty, a few hours usually does it. Limiting the time the steel is in the evapo will extend the life of it. If you wash the parts with straight water after evapo, they will start rusting before you can put something else on them.

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MrUnix

4241 posts in 1665 days


#5 posted 04-05-2015 02:04 AM

If you wash the parts with straight water after evapo, they will start rusting before you can put something else on them.

Hmmm…. been doing just that for years on thousands of parts, and the instructions specifically say to wash in fresh water after soaking! As long as you dry it thoroughly after rinsing, it’s not really a problem. Basically it’s the exact same procedure as you would use with electrolysis rust removal. Once it’s done, it’s just like any other bare metal and you need to somehow protect it from rusting again. Prime stuff that will be painted, or wax/oil those that will remain shiny.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You can’t paint over dried evaporust – don’t ask how I know :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#6 posted 04-05-2015 12:45 PM



Its the red oxide, rust FeO3, turned into black oxide, FeO2.

- OSU55

Actually, rust is hydrated ferric (iron +3) oxide. Fe2O3 – nH2O. Black ion oxides include ferrous (iron +2) oxide FeO and a mixed ferrous/ferric oxide Fe3O4.

That said, the Scotchbright pad should do the trick.

View Furnitude's profile

Furnitude

373 posts in 2974 days


#7 posted 04-06-2015 03:36 PM

That’s for the info, folks. I got a scotchbright pad and it worked well. I appreciate the help!

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1061 posts in 3080 days


#8 posted 04-07-2015 01:02 AM

I agree with a lot of this – I have Evaporust on a lot of reclaimed tools.

1. rinse the Evaporust off after removing the parts from Evaporust – do NOT let it dry on the parts.
2. I haven’t seen a helluva lot of problem with rusting after rinsing parts soaked in Evaporust – but I do dry them right after rinsing.
3. The black stuff left after Evaporust is really loose – so loose in fact, that you might not even need scotchbrites. Many times I find that the loose black stuff can be rubbed off with your fingers. But a scotchbrite will rub it all off and shine up the newly rust-free part really nice.

One of the biggest project I did with Evaporust was this one

I think you’ll agree – it came out OK.

Another was this one

By far the most impressive part of this project was the legs for the stand. They were covered with rust. After soaking in Evaporust, the legs of this stand were still coated with the original paint and no rust! They looked damned near new!

Try it! I think you’ll be amazed!

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View Jeffjr02's profile

Jeffjr02

134 posts in 494 days


#9 posted 09-08-2015 03:24 PM

I know it’s late to the party, but I use Dawn and either a scotch brite pad or a brass wire brush. I use the brass for something really rough cast (like a maul head). Then I dry them right away and apply paste wax or WD-40 (temporary).

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