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Forum topic by dalec posted 07-07-2009 03:25 AM 4051 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


07-07-2009 03:25 AM

Hi LJ’s

I am slowly accumulating a set of woodworking power tools. The pace has slowed as my funds go up and down. In any event, I know I will need a jointer, if I get more into woodworking. I have found a listing for a used Grizzly jointer (G1018), so the jointer is a generation or two older than the current offering from Grizzly. I am concerned that the individual selling it doesn’t know a lot about it. It is wired for 220 and from the sounds of it, he does not have a 220 power source to demo the jointer.

I believe it is a decent deal, but am concerned that I may get burned with a non working machine. I am up to tuning a jointer, but don’t want to buy a project. I have no experience with jointers other than what I have read in my self education on various power tools.

I am thinking, I can ask if I can rewire the jointer to 110V just to determine if the jointer runs and for smoothness. Not sure if I will be able to joint a board as a test.

So here is the question of my fellow LJ’s:

What are the things I need to look at if I decide to look the jointer over?

Dalec


21 replies so far

View aurora's profile

aurora

228 posts in 2712 days


#1 posted 07-07-2009 03:38 AM

inside the junction box on the motor is a wiring diagram to wire it over to 110, and by all means test it out BEFORE you buy it !!! run a couple of oak boards, flatten a full 6 inch board and joint an edge. check out the knives in it for edge and nicks. tables should be clean and generally pit free. a bit of oxidation won’t hurt and you can clean it up, but not pits, they are could mean a porous castings. table should adjust up and down smoothly. the older grizzlies are not what the newer ones are, but are still a mile up from the harbor frieght/central machinery junk units. good luck !

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 3158 days


#2 posted 07-07-2009 03:42 AM

Check the motor some motors can easily be change to 110v all you have to do is o open the cover at the wires and loo in. If you cannot try it I would not buy it. Take your time you will find others.

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


#3 posted 07-07-2009 04:02 AM

Thanks Aurora and GMman,

I was burned on a table saw purchase several years ago. I ended up investing about $250 for the manufacturers service center to replace parts. I have to admit I got too excited and did not approach it as cautiously as I am with this jointer. I was able to locate a manual for the jointer on-line, so wiring it to 110V should not be difficult. But as I recall the G1018 has a magnetic 220v switch and I suspect the jointer will not run 110V using the 220v switch. Does anyone know about this?

Aurora, I appreciate the specific recommendations on what to look for with a used jointer.

Finally, I agree with both of you, I would not buy the jointer, if I can not run the jointer under power.

Dalec

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GMman

3902 posts in 3158 days


#4 posted 07-07-2009 04:03 AM

aurora gave you about the best advise you can have

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


#5 posted 07-07-2009 04:22 AM

GMman, It is reassuring to have someone like you and Aurora to fill in in the information void about jointers that a novice like me needs to make an informed purchase decision.

Thanks again.

Dalec

View Taigert's profile

Taigert

593 posts in 3301 days


#6 posted 07-07-2009 09:46 AM

Dale,
I would take a straight edge to check for flatness as well, check to make sure the beds are not out of paraell (sp?) to early in the morning, or twisting. Use like a winding stick.
Also if you have a electrical test meter. Check for amp draw and continuity between the motor and its housing.
Depending on the plug he has on the cord you may not be able to plug into 110 plug. What you can do is take a old extension cord if you have one. Cut the cord so you have a male end, and wire rhe female end into a light switch take a 4×4 electrical box with you. then wire the machine into the other side of the light switch. And for safety sake screw the switch into the 4×4 box, plug the cord into a 110 plug now you can feed power to the machine by just turning on the swich. Then push the start button at the machine. This makes a handy test set up.

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View Don K.'s profile

Don K.

1075 posts in 2787 days


#7 posted 07-07-2009 09:53 AM

Dale,
The mag switch is no big deal if you are willing to spend about $5 to $10 to try it out, if your sure it is a duel 110/220 volt, just buy yourself about ten feet of good elect. cord and a male plug, disconnect the wires from the motor and wire the cord directly to the motor…it will NOT have a on off switch so be VERY careful, but you will at least be able to plug it into a wall outlet to see if the Jointer works.

-- Don S.E. OK

View Taigert's profile

Taigert

593 posts in 3301 days


#8 posted 07-07-2009 10:52 AM

i forgot about the magnetic switch like Don said just go straight to the motor.
The whole set up wont be more than 5 bucks

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


#9 posted 07-07-2009 05:00 PM

Thanks EdC and Don for the additional thoughts about testing the used jointer.

I am feeling less excited about the jointer than I was yesterday. I guess there is nothing like time and a healthy sprinkling of doubt to tone things down a bit.

I will contact the seller to see if he is open to my testing the jointer out and to give the jointer a decent once over before I seriously think about making offer or passing on it.

I very much appreciate the advise from all you for your thoughts on my topic.

Dalec

View Paul C.'s profile

Paul C.

154 posts in 2705 days


#10 posted 07-07-2009 08:47 PM

It may seem obvious, but take a square to make sure you can set the fence square.

View Don K.'s profile

Don K.

1075 posts in 2787 days


#11 posted 07-07-2009 08:57 PM

Dale,
For that matter, if you have a good extension cord…you do not even have to buy one, just cut off the female end and use it….while it may not be strong enough gage wise to run on for any long length of time…it will be more than enough to just check it out and joint a piece or two. Then when you are done….just spend two dollars and put another female plug back on it.

I also understand what you mean about feeling “Less excited” about it. I have done this many times…found a tool that I thought I could not live with out and wanted to buy then and there…but after sleeping on it…they sometimes lose their luster. (I have also bought them on the spot and later really regretted it)

Bottom line is if it’s a good deal and you have the money…then go for it…if your having doubt’s…then there may be a reason. Not trying to stick my nose where it does not belong….but do you mind telling us what the asking price is ?? I am sure someone here will know immediately if it is a good deal or not.

-- Don S.E. OK

View BroDave's profile

BroDave

107 posts in 3274 days


#12 posted 07-07-2009 09:20 PM

I would take a straight edge to check for flatness as well, check to make sure the beds are not out of paraell (sp?) to early in the morning, or twisting. Use like a winding stick.
Also if you have a electrical test meter. Check for amp draw and continuity between the motor and its housing.
Depending on the plug he has on the cord you may not be able to plug into 110 plug. What you can do is take a old extension cord if you have one. Cut the cord so you have a male end, and wire rhe female end into a light switch take a 4×4 electrical box with you. then wire the machine into the other side of the light switch. And for safety sake screw the switch into the 4×4 box, plug the cord into a 110 plug now you can feed power to the machine by just turning on the swich. Then push the start button at the machine. This makes a handy test set up.

—Ed – Milan, IN

And what would happen to the motor since this machine is wired for 220 volts and the seller does not have 220 available? dalec may not want to buy this jointer but if he does that, he WILL at least pay for a new motor.

dalec, the best advice you could follow is don’t even think about buying a machine that you can’t see in operation.

-- .

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


#13 posted 07-07-2009 10:25 PM

Again thanks to the many of you for your ideas.

In response to your perfectly good question Don, the jointer is a Grizzly G1018 (8”, I believe with a 65” table length, and this one has been upgraded with a spiral cutter, 1-1/2 hp, runs on 110V or 220V) all for $425 asking price. My concern is the seller doesn’t seem to know a lot about it, so that what seems like a good deal may turn out to be a very bad deal.

I was able to load the Grizzly G1018 manual on-line. It is dual voltage and can be wired to run on either 110V or 220V, so it would not be difficult to switch between the two voltages. The assumption is if it run under 110V, it should do as well or better with 220V.

I have sent the seller an e-message asking if he will allow me to temporarily re-wire his jointer for 110V for testing purposes. He hasn’t gotten back to me as yet.

Dalec

View MNWOODWORKER's profile

MNWOODWORKER

105 posts in 3045 days


#14 posted 07-09-2009 08:15 AM

I am not familular with Grizzly, so I may be wasting your time here, but I have done some rebuilding of the older Delta and Rockwells. I don’t know about how old of a machine you are talking here but if it needs bearings or anything like that down the road you might want to see if Grizzly handles OEM parts for their older stuff. That is one saving grace with the older Delta-Rockwell’s and so on is that all the bearings you can get through any auto store. Years ago I had an off brand lathe that had a bearing from another planet and I was SOL, just don’t want to see that happen to you, just a thought. I am sure that there are many people that can answer that ? here as well. Keep us posted and I hope it all goes well for you.
Nate

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 3349 days


#15 posted 07-09-2009 03:43 PM

Thanks Nate,

It is something I haven’t thought about. It is worth looking into the availability of replacement parts before buying a used piece of machinery.

I am scheduled to go over to have a look at the machine this morning. I am going over with the plan to check out the machine, then giving myself at least a day to consider it. I will include all the advice from this forum topic and your suggestion about checking with Grizzly about replacement parts before making any offer.
It was not snatched up immediately, so that may be not such a good sign.

Dalec

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