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stupid workbench question

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 04-01-2015 02:16 PM 914 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3024 posts in 1263 days


04-01-2015 02:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a sturdy, homemade SYP workbench. I have not taken time to put in drawers because I want to take time to make things I like. So, I have a simple shelf that works pretty well, except for one thing: sawdust, shavings, and chips go through the dog holes and get over everything on the shelf. With my improved dust collection, the only surface covered with sawdust, etc. are the items on my shelf.

Absent building in drawers, anybody else had this problem and developed a solution?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


10 replies so far

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#1 posted 04-01-2015 03:47 PM

That’s why some benches are designed with drawers and shelves in an enclosed cabinet and have a space between the cabinet and the bench top. That space is for clamps and also to store sawdust.

I could see that space being easy to hook up to the dust collector and then the dog holes would function like a floor sweep. Have something you want to get rid of just sweep it to a dog hole.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#2 posted 04-01-2015 03:54 PM



That s why some benches are designed with drawers and shelves in an enclosed cabinet and have a space between the cabinet and the bench top. That space is for clamps and also to store sawdust.

- crank49

Crank speaks truth. Move the shelf up by putting drawers under it, and you’re still collecting sawdust, shavings, etc.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3128 days


#3 posted 04-01-2015 04:10 PM

Nothing stupid about the question … that’s why I built my bench with a separate cabinet …
Click for details

Every so often I just hit with compressed air then vacuum up the shavings and dust.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1424 days


#4 posted 04-01-2015 04:36 PM

Great bench Gerry.

How did you drill your holes and make sure they were spot on, it is very important to make sure they are square, right? Also, do the holes go through the top workspace?

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3128 days


#5 posted 04-01-2015 05:40 PM


How did you drill your holes and make sure they were spot on, it is very important to make sure they are square, right? Also, do the holes go through the top workspace?

I drew a matrix on the top with a framing square. I used a drill guide and started them with a Forstner bit (to get a clean shoulder), then drilled through with an auger-style bit. I clamped a piece of plywood to the underside to minimize blowout.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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DIYaholic

19179 posts in 2140 days


#6 posted 04-01-2015 06:47 PM

What about a masonite or 1/8” ply “shelf/drawer” that would slide out. It would collect the dust, then just slide out and clean it off. Kinda like a “crumb tray” for/on a toaster oven….

May seem like a lot of work…. compared to Gerry’s solution!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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CharlesA

3024 posts in 1263 days


#7 posted 04-01-2015 06:57 PM

Thanks everyone for all the responses. For a long time I was storing a log of items on the floor under the table, so I didn’t want to install a large cabinet with drawers/doors. I don’t do that anymore, so I may end up with a cabinet down there at some point. I also wanted adequate clamping surface.

I’m not going to do a cabinet anytime soon, so I may go for the sheet of plywood an inch or so under the top. that seems easy and helpful.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Richard

1901 posts in 2156 days


#8 posted 04-01-2015 07:04 PM


What about a masonite or 1/8” ply “shelf/drawer” that would slide out. It would collect the dust, then just slide out and clean it off. Kinda like a “crumb tray” for/on a toaster oven….

May seem like a lot of work…. compared to Gerry s solution!!!

- DIYaholic


Now that is a good idea to me, just slde it out and Vac or Blow it off. The Vac may be better so you don’t get everything else covered in dust.

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#9 posted 04-01-2015 08:57 PM

crumb tray for a toster; perfect analogy

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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moke

861 posts in 2242 days


#10 posted 04-02-2015 05:40 PM

Iwould make sure your crumb tray will come out….what if you want to use a hold-fast?
Mike

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