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Walnut and Maple Bench Top Question

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Forum topic by skogie1 posted 03-31-2015 07:16 PM 785 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


03-31-2015 07:16 PM

I’m building a shoe rack, about 12”Dx26”W. The top will be a bench. I plan on using maple and walnut and was just going to rip stock and laminate together but then I got a more creative idea, see picture. I’m trying to figure out the simplest way to do this. Any thoughts and ideas? Thanks in advance!


12 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 683 days


#1 posted 03-31-2015 07:26 PM

Stack and tape the 3 pieces of mat, draw your lines then run the 3 through the BS, glue them together then size the composite. You might get away with a jigsaw with a long blade

-- I meant to do that!

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#2 posted 03-31-2015 08:19 PM

What he said – stack and bandsaw.

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skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


#3 posted 03-31-2015 09:37 PM

Great. Thanks very much!

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Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#4 posted 04-01-2015 03:55 AM

When you glue up you’ll have to have firm blocks on the sides and top and bottom or it will slide on you. It’ll be a tricky glue-up, but fun. It wouldn’t hurt to practice.

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skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


#5 posted 04-01-2015 01:42 PM

Yonak, good point re glue up. Also, I was thinking, because some of the material will disappear during the cut I expect that when the pieces are put together that the edges of the top will not be flush. Right?

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 691 days


#6 posted 04-01-2015 02:03 PM

Or make 1/4 ply templates. then run the router over them with a pattern bit. This would allow you to sand the ply profile in a very nice arc then transfer it to the stock with the router. Both pieces would fit and be exactly what the template is. Rough it within 1/16 on the bandsaw first.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#7 posted 04-01-2015 02:23 PM


...because some of the material will disappear during the cut I expect that when the pieces are put together that the edges of the top will not be flush. Right?

- skogie1

You’re cutting to the edge of the adjoining piece. The kerf should already be accounted for.


Or make 1/4 ply templates. then run the router over them with a pattern bit. This would allow you to sand the ply profile in a very nice arc then transfer it to the stock with the router. Both pieces would fit and be exactly what the template is. Rough it within 1/16 on the bandsaw first.

- SirIrb

Irb, it’s my opinion that this is a wasted step. If you have to cut and sand to shape the template, why not do it right to the component pieces ? No router involved.

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1036 days


#8 posted 04-01-2015 02:32 PM

could you use biscuits in the glue up to help with alignment?

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#9 posted 04-01-2015 02:38 PM



could you use biscuits in the glue up to help with alignment?

- daddywoofdawg

I doubt that a biscuits would seat properly due to the curve preventing cutting the slot to the correct depth.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#10 posted 04-01-2015 06:50 PM


Or make 1/4 ply templates. then run the router over them with a pattern bit. This would allow you to sand the ply profile in a very nice arc then transfer it to the stock with the router. Both pieces would fit and be exactly what the template is. Rough it within 1/16 on the bandsaw first.

- SirIrb

Irb, it s my opinion that this is a wasted step. If you have to cut and sand to shape the template, why not do it right to the component pieces ? No router involved.

- Yonak

Upon reflection, I see how the template and router method would be helpful to keep the edges square if a spindle sander or disk sander is not available.

- Yonak

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skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 04-02-2015 11:48 AM

Thanks for all the input everyone. I think I will use a router.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 683 days


#12 posted 04-02-2015 03:10 PM

Even with jigs to hold the mat in place the footprint won’t be square or parallel. Never has for me. I account for it and make the items larger than the finish dim so they can be resized. The box top above has differing widths of full depth mahogany running through, that made it even more unruly during clampage.

The last one I did I made a template to the fin dim of the cover, once the glue up was dry I DS taped the temp to the cover and ran it through the TS with an offset jig. If you have a panel sled or one of the Incra miter gauges you really only need to straight edge one side to the TS fence, remove the straight edge then parallel it. The sled or Incra will square it.

-- I meant to do that!

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