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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 03-31-2015 05:20 PM 1293 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

294 posts in 843 days


03-31-2015 05:20 PM

I have found myself recently cutting some narrow strips and didn’t feel very safe using push sticks so I want to get a gripper to avoid an accident. On amazon they have the GR-100 for $59, the GR-200 for $79 or two GR-100s for $109. What would be the most useful?
I know some people have mentioned they have these and don’t use them but I am very sure i would be using them and the price is not an issue to feel and be safer.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


25 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 03-31-2015 05:27 PM

For ripping thin stock, a thin-rip jig is easier and safer IMHO. You can purchase them or make one yourself.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 798 days


#2 posted 03-31-2015 05:39 PM

I have two grippers with all the bells and whistles and tend not to use them because they are a bit of a hassle to set up properly. I prefer to cut thin strips on the waste side as suggested by Brad above. The full bells and whistle grippers do work when ripping thin stock into thinner stock because the included plate balances the thin stock as you are ripping it. There’s all sorts of stuff that the grippers can do and some people love them but I guess I am too lazy. Also, if my recollection serves me, the thinnest leg is 1/4” or so; you won’t be able to rip something that is 1/4” or less with a gripper without cutting into the thin leg.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#3 posted 03-31-2015 05:41 PM

I had bought a GR 100 when Lowes was clearing them out for $39 (I think). I wasn’t too impressed with it and took it back. But as these things go, the extras on the GR200 might not be worth it for the intended use, it should do what you want. My first choice would be a shop made thin rip jig, the GR100 would also work and might make you more comfortable.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#4 posted 03-31-2015 05:47 PM

Dont waste your money on a Gripper.

Make one yourself.

A simple 2×6 on edge with a heel will push both the keeper and the offcut through the blade.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1260 days


#5 posted 03-31-2015 05:53 PM

I love my Grripper and definitely prefer it to a thin rip jig because it is much easier to make identical, multiple cuts.

The 200 has nice features, but the 100 does mostly what you need. I’m a big fan.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1143 days


#6 posted 03-31-2015 06:08 PM

I have two of the older designs and I love them. One i leave with the adjustment spacer and stabilizer plate on it at all times and the other I just have the basic block. They are not that hard or time consuming to setup and for thin pieces of stock are well worth their costs. I would like to add on the heel at some point but never have gotten around to checking into it to closely. The adjustment spacer and stabilizer plate is really what makes the Gripper useful for thin stock as it works to both hold the piece down on the table and against the fence at the same time.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#7 posted 03-31-2015 06:30 PM

I bought a GR100 at Christmas and use it all the time. Great tool. I got mine for $39 and never regretted the money. I still use some of my shop made push sticks, sometimes they are just easier, but the GRippper gives you a good feeling of control.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7172 posts in 2039 days


#8 posted 03-31-2015 07:04 PM

Another vote for the Gripper :)

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


#9 posted 04-01-2015 12:04 AM

Another +1 for the Grrripper. I feel far more comfortable using it than not.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2086 days


#10 posted 04-01-2015 12:15 AM

I just use a 2×4 with a tab on the back. They don’t last long, but I feel really safe pushing the thin strip against the fence. I make fishing nets, so I have cut hundreds of strips this way.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#11 posted 04-01-2015 12:37 AM

I got two of them. Best investment in safety equipment, I ever made! Great for thin strips and anything else. Well worth it and you won’t regret buying them. Remember if you register with woodcraft you get a 10% birthday discount that is nice.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#12 posted 04-01-2015 12:46 AM

Of course all you Griiiiippppper guys love them you have to or you wasted your money. :-))

Same thing with featherboards make ‘em yourself for nothing!

Go jumbojack!!!

................at least one person agrees with me.

Is it Grrrippper or Grippppper? I can never remember that name…..

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1260 days


#13 posted 04-01-2015 01:03 AM



Of course all you Griiiiippppper guys love them you have to or you wasted your money. :-))

Same thing with featherboards make em yourself for nothing!

Go jumbojack!!!

................at least one person agrees with me.

Is it Grrrippper or Grippppper? I can never remember that name…..

- Robert Engel

Yes, because we all know that no one on LJs complains about products they have purchased.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View TimberMagic's profile

TimberMagic

114 posts in 641 days


#14 posted 04-01-2015 01:31 AM

Buy the two-pack of GRR-Rippers. For long rips, you can use a “hand-over-hand” technique like you would use on a jointer. I’ve had mine for 2 years and swear by them. Takes a bit to set up? That to me is not an issue when safety is concerned. And once you are familiar with them, setup is actually pretty easy. Most of my adjustments are usually to slide a leg over to fit a wider or narrower piece to rip. They are safer than any other pushing device. You have control both downward, and against the fence. A push stick only advances a piece of wood thru the blade, but offers no lateral control.

making your own push stick is one thing, but you will likely never get the precision and flexibility from a home made unit. They have a serious amount of thought and engineering that went into their design.

Lastly, Microjig developed the proprietary gripping surface on the bottom of the legs, so you won’t find that material for awhile, if ever.

Another nice push pad from Microjig is the GRR-Rip Block. One of my push blocks for my jointer went “slick” after a couple years. I bought one of the GRR-Rip Blocks and will likely buy a second. The integral gravity heel rides on the surface of the wood, and will drop down over the back edge to give greater ability to push stock. A similar heel is now available for the GRR-Ripper (it comes standard with a sacrificial heel if you want to use one.) I laser cut a bunch from thin MDF as replacements, but you can buy replacements.

I am impressed with their products for a reason. I had an accident on my table saw 4 years ago, and lost about 1/2” off the tip of my left thumb. I will upgrade to a SawStop some day, but these products are the safest I’ve found for use with standard table saws.

-- Lee

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

296 posts in 738 days


#15 posted 04-01-2015 01:51 AM

I bought the two pack of i believe the 200 model. Has all the bells and whistles. I put one together used it a few times and the other is still in the box unused. I’ll probably use the one every once in a while but doubt I’ll ever use the other.
Gerald

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