LumberJocks

Blade drifting down on Table Saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by KAnderson30 posted 03-29-2015 10:57 PM 1006 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View KAnderson30's profile

KAnderson30

2 posts in 617 days


03-29-2015 10:57 PM

Hi fellow woodworkers. I am a new poster to lumberjocks. I was looking for some feedback and came across this great site. However, I couldn’t find any info about the problem I am having.

I have a pretty cheap tablesaw. Its the mobile porter cable table saw. I think pcb222ts something like that.

Anyway my problem is I was trying to cut half laps using my single blade (Dont have a dado set) using my crosscut sled and noticed how much the depth of cut changed throughout. My guess is the vibration of the saw and weight of the motor move the blade down.

Has anyone had this problem on cheaper saws? And any solutions to fix this? A way to lock the depth adjustment in place?

Thanks for the help.


10 replies so far

View gfadvm's profile (online now)

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#1 posted 03-30-2015 01:08 AM

My first tablesaw was a cheap Ryobi and I had the same problem until someone here told me to RAISE the blade to the required height rather than LOWERING it to the required height. Don’t ask me to explain why, but it stopped my blade lowering problem!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2706 days


#2 posted 03-30-2015 11:28 PM

When you lower rather than raise the blade, the backlash in the screw adjusting mechanism allows the blade to drop due to it’s own weight and vibration. This is true for any saw, from a cheap table saw to an expensive cabinet saw.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1326 posts in 1440 days


#3 posted 03-31-2015 12:01 AM

Glad you posted this. I just tried half laps on a box and had the same problem. Thanks for the advice guys. I have a very basic skil table saw.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View splatman's profile

splatman

558 posts in 861 days


#4 posted 04-01-2015 03:37 AM

I ran into the same issue years ago. And I figured out the ‘only raise to the mark’ trick. When lowering the blade to a new level, I over-lower it, then raise it.

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#5 posted 04-01-2015 05:15 AM

Let us know if it corrected your problem.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View KAnderson30's profile

KAnderson30

2 posts in 617 days


#6 posted 04-01-2015 11:36 AM

Thanks for all the replies everyone! I haven’t had a chance to try it out yet but you all are in agreement so my hopes are high that this will fix my problem.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#7 posted 04-01-2015 11:37 AM



When you lower rather than raise the blade, the backlash in the screw adjusting mechanism allows the blade to drop due to it s own weight and vibration. This is true for any saw, from a cheap table saw to an expensive cabinet saw.

- MrRon

I’ve never experienced this with my Jet cabinet saw.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1197 days


#8 posted 04-01-2015 03:14 PM

I don’t have have a cheap table saw, but I do have an old table saw that I inherited from my grandfather that lacks the height lock function.

In my case, raising the blade to the required height does help but it does not solve my issue. My blade still drifts down during the series of cuts. It became readily apparent when I was making cabinet rails and styles with a groove for the panel and my stub tenons didn’t fit the later cuts.

I’ve read and found that some people use clamps and vice grip type pliers to hold it in place. I plan on building a cabinet and using a rod clamp like you might see in a laboratory holding a beaker over a flame to hold the shaft of my height adjustment in place.

My grandfather didn’t spend much time cleaning the saw, so when I got it the worm drive was coated in sticky saw dust (most likely due to the pine resin since everything he made was out of pine). I suspect that helped prevent the drift, but it was nearly impossible to turn the hand wheel. Now it turns well, but it won’t stay in place.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#9 posted 04-01-2015 03:48 PM

Sounds like a Craigslist unload and a new saw are in your future!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View patron's profile

patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#10 posted 04-01-2015 04:01 PM

have had that prob at times
with various saws

make a wedge
to stide behind the crank

as stated raise the blade to the height you want
tap the wedge in with s hammer lightly

should keep the crank handle from spinning

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com