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Help with plane tuning- from jointer to smoother

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Forum topic by TheFridge posted 03-28-2015 02:55 PM 809 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


03-28-2015 02:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip question trick oak mahogany maple blade jointer plane sharpening

Howdy, looking for help setting up my planes. I have a 24” wood bodied jointer, #6, #5, #5 scrub, 2- #4s, 60 1/2, and I think a 110 and 220 blocks that I’ve never used.

I mainly work with cypress, maple and white oak, but I have a some sapele, mahogany of a sort, and some red grandis that would be next on the list of the woods I have to work with and use a vast majority of the time.

From jointer to jack to smoother to blocks, I’m trying to get a good idea of the camber (if any) I need to put on each iron, the typical sharpening angles, and how close the mouth should be for woods I work with and whether I need a irons setup for hard, soft, curly or whatever.

Any kids be of help or recommendations would be greatly appreciated and any questions I need to answer I will gladly do it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.


14 replies so far

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1399 days


#1 posted 03-28-2015 05:23 PM

Here’s what I do, but I am not a pro by any means

1. Jointer – Don’t have one, sorry
2. Jack – 1/32ish camber, 35 degree micro bevel, mouth pretty wide open
3. Smoother – Barely even a camber at all maybe a few thousandths, 35 degree micro bevel, Mouth as tight as you can get it, and get the chipbreaker as close as you can get it to the tip of the iron – literally .3 or .2 mm if you can manage
4. Block – No camber, 30 or 35 degree micro bevel, mouth as tight as you can if you are taking thin shavings

I bought an aftermarket IBC matched iron and chipbreaker set and it was the best purchase I ever made as far as planes go. There are guys on this site who say you can get an original iron to perform like a Lie nielsen. Well, they are ninjas and I am not. I’d rather spend 80 bucks on a sweet aftermarket iron/chipbreaker set than days of frustration trying like hell to get an original iron to work extremely well.

Something else I have learned is that the mating of the iron and chipbreaker are very important, and are an important factor in preventing tearout. Get the chipbreaker as close to the tip of the iron as you can when taking smoothing passes.

Good luck. I am sure there will be lots of great input on this question.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#2 posted 03-28-2015 08:36 PM

Thanks bud

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14583 posts in 2147 days


#3 posted 03-28-2015 09:48 PM

Both jointers I have: barely camber at the corners, chipbreaker just shy of the corners
I have a buncg of jacks: some have a 8” camber, and some almost none. Have done any secondary bevels.
Smoothers: again just the corners, if at all, get a slight camber ( plane tracks). Not sure IF the strop does an extra bevel.
Blocks: No camber. Ground at 25 to 30 degrees ( hand sharpened, unsure exact bevel angle) Trying to match factory grinds. have a low angle ( without adjustable mouth) and a couple 9-1/2s with the mouth closed up. Not much difference.

I do have a CHEAP white candle in the shop. A few squiggles on the soles helps a lot.

CB on the Millers Falls #8 and #9s are less than a 64th from the edge of the iron. I tune the chipbreakers to make sure there is zero gap between the iron and the chipbreaker.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#4 posted 03-28-2015 10:08 PM

No cambers, I just put a little extra pressure on sides when sharpening.
Eventually you take off the corners just a smidge (we’re talking a few thou) and that’s all you need to avoid plane tracks.

Since you have 2 4’s you could to the 8” radius camber (which seems like a lot to me) or some other camber like 9 or 10”.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#5 posted 03-28-2015 10:12 PM

Awesome. Appreciate it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#6 posted 03-29-2015 12:26 AM

Those old blades and cap irons can some time to fit. I would like to try the newer one$.
Camber, I use none, but I do the grind on an industrial grinder. The soles on my old Bailey planes are flatter then LN can get them-no rocking, leaving no edge tracks…..none.

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oltexasboy1

240 posts in 1168 days


#7 posted 03-29-2015 12:42 AM

There are a million videos and books on sharpening , having said that, a little camber helps as your blade dulls during use, so I have a slight camber on my blades. The main thing I have found is that they ALL need to be scary sharp. That will overcome a lot of amateur mistakes and misjudgments. I have when using the bigger planes#6 ,#7 have found it beneficial to put a little camber on the blades to keep me from digging in the corners if I don’t have the plane perfectly positioned, which happens a lot since I am old and run out of gas pretty easy . Good Luck.

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#8 posted 03-29-2015 01:01 AM

The only possible way and edge track can show is, if the planes sole at the edges is lower then the central portion of the sole.
Since the sole is wider the blade, its not possible for the blades edge to contact….if the sole is actually flat.
Most all Bailey planes, due to the way the soles were finished, they are rounded or sloped at the edges allowing the blade edges to make more contact from rocking then the central area.

So,. if the plane is not truly flat, the blade will need to be cambered to the point it will not leave tracks, not that big of a deal.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1399 days


#9 posted 03-29-2015 02:59 AM

unbob… I don’t want to ambush a thread, but that doesn’t make any sense to me. With a perfectly flat sole and a perfectly flat blade protruding out, the entire blade will be cutting the wood, including the sharp corners. This will inherently leave tracks, albeit very slight ones.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#10 posted 03-29-2015 03:01 AM

No big deal bud.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JayT

4780 posts in 1675 days


#11 posted 03-29-2015 03:14 AM

#5 jack-8in radius camber #6 fore-12in radius camber

Jointers and smoothers are sharpened straight with corners eased. I do have a 5-1/2 with a light camber for when I want a scalloped surface.

Yes, a track can show on a plane with a perfectly flat sole, if the corners are not eased or the lateral adjustment is off a bit.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#12 posted 03-29-2015 10:52 AM


Those old blades and cap irons can some time to fit. I would like to try the newer one$. Camber, I use none, but I do the grind on an industrial grinder. The soles on my old Bailey planes are flatter then LN can get them-no rocking, leaving no edge tracks…..none.

- unbob

That brings up a good point. Edge tracks can be caused by an unflat sole, so check that first.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#13 posted 03-29-2015 10:58 AM


unbob… I don t want to ambush a thread, but that doesn t make any sense to me. With a perfectly flat sole and a perfectly flat blade protruding out, the entire blade will be cutting the wood, including the sharp corners. This will inherently leave tracks, albeit very slight ones.

- TheWoodenOyster

From experience, I know both you and JayT are correct.

I think unbob is correct too, but an unflat sole isn’t the “only” way to get a track.

He is correct about an unflat sole, and this is why its critical to check it, even on a new plane.
Tracks occur because the blade will be protruding more than the sole at the corners, that is to say, the plane will be rocking. And as you know just a few thou in a handplane can make or break it and the only way to make up for it is to have a cambered blade.

Personally I don’t think cambers are necessary if the sole is flat.

Even if the plane is perfect, I found relieving the corners avoids the problem.

Its just simply exerting a little more pressure on each corner for a few strokes in each phase of sharpening.
We’re only talking a 2-3 thou or so in the outer 1/2” or so of the blade.

The idea is the blade is level with (or slightly above) the sole at the corners.
In theory, 2 thou relieved blade corner should not leave a track in a blade giving a 2 thou thick shaving.

After screwing up a couple blades do to error mulitiplication, I now use a sharpening jig because I feel I can regulate it better.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#14 posted 03-29-2015 12:58 PM

I’ll put it to use.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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