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Crosscut sled - different way to make it

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Forum topic by niki posted 08-29-2007 12:03 PM 3678 views 22 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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niki

426 posts in 2777 days


08-29-2007 12:03 PM

Good day

The idea is very simple, I make part of the sled, cut the kerf and refer to it as a reference point or line to position the “Back Fence” square to the kerf by “locking” everything together.

I discovered that the plastic drawing triangles are very, very accurate, and I use them to locate the fence (actually, as you will see, I’m using the shop-made triangles that were “copied” from the plastic one).

My table saw is different and has only one miter slot, so I made some kind of “fiction” miter slots and runners for the guys with the “normal” table saw…(I think everybody except me).

Please note that I’m cutting the runners to a smaller than the miter slot width…to prevent binding with humidity changes and also not to “play” so much with the “perfect fit” of the runners to the miter slots and that, saves a lot of time and simplifies the construction.

It took me around 1½ hours to make it (including 148 pics), so I assume that it should take you 2~2½ hours, considering that you have to prepare the parts (I used scraps from around the garage).

Sorry for the Millimeters but I made the text for European forums as well and I was too lazy to make two set’s of pictures…

Regards
niki

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20 replies so far

View furnitologist's profile

furnitologist

198 posts in 2710 days


#1 posted 08-29-2007 02:01 PM

Hi Niki-................like the idea of the triangles and also your wood screws…..neat!!!!

View Mario's profile

Mario

902 posts in 2748 days


#2 posted 08-29-2007 05:13 PM

Thank you soo much for this post I do not have a crosscut sled yet but will now.

thank you again

-- Hope Never fails

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2858 days


#3 posted 08-29-2007 05:23 PM

Well done Niki. I made a cross cut sled for my table saw, but not so elaborate. Also, it is only on one side of the blade. So that I could get it accurate, I made it attachable to the miter gauge by screws. Then I just have to make sure the miter gauge is set at 90 degrees, and can get straight cuts.

I use it for rough cutting long lengths of board. It works pretty well. There can be problems when cutting a long board on the right side. The gravity of the board coming down can cause pressure on the blade. If it is a long piece, I will put a small piece of plywood underneath to make it more level.

Overall, my sled has been a great assist in making it easier to cut down long lumber. Someday, I want to make a real sled like yours. Good work.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2777 days


#4 posted 08-29-2007 06:00 PM

Thank you so much

Bill
I have also “one side sled” (actually two) and when I work with it, I put another, same thickness board on the other side of the blade. This board is held in place by a runner that is attached under the board and slids into a slot in the rip fence rail.
You can make something similar with two “fences” attached under the board, one at the front and one at the back of the board and “click” it over the table.

niki

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View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2733 days


#5 posted 11-08-2007 05:25 AM

Thanks, Niki. I was just about to build a new sled so I thought I do a search on LJ to see what we had. What a surprise to see that you’ve provided a comprehensive HOWTO on aligning the back fence. Thanks!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34891 posts in 3097 days


#6 posted 11-08-2007 06:08 AM

Very good Niki. It a very full set of pictures.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2718 days


#7 posted 11-08-2007 06:14 AM

Nice job Niki and carefully thought out.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2777 days


#8 posted 11-08-2007 10:26 AM

Thank you so much for your kind replies

You can increase the “slipperiness” of the sled (actually, any sled) by “iron on” this plastic edge banding…two strips, one on each side, near the blade and two, one on each side close to the edges of the sled…parallel to the miter slots.

The plastic tape, besides being very slippery, will reduce the contact area and by that, the drag.

Tom (mot)
I would like to hear (and see) how it worked for you.
I’m so confident with this method that, when I made the “All seasons rolling sled”, I did not bother with screws, I just “super glued” the fence to the sled.

Regards
niki

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View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2691 days


#9 posted 11-08-2007 04:16 PM

Niki,

If I only had half of your brain, I think I could be good at woodworking… ;^D

Thanks for amazing me, yet once again, with this great post.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2777 days


#10 posted 11-08-2007 11:13 PM

Thank you TomFran

Well, it’s not so much of a brain if it took me 13 years to get to this solution…

Regards
niki

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2496 days


#11 posted 03-01-2008 12:01 PM

this is great. I am sure that this will help many people.

-- making sawdust....

View HallTree's profile

HallTree

5661 posts in 2464 days


#12 posted 03-01-2008 04:04 PM

Very well illustrated. I can see that a lot of thought and planning went into this project. Thanks.

-- "Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life" Solomon

View Scott Wigginton's profile

Scott Wigginton

50 posts in 2442 days


#13 posted 03-01-2008 04:18 PM

Very great design and well laid out instructions! Now if only I can figured out that darn metric system… ;p

I’m wondering if you could attach the front edge immediately after gluing the bed to the rails, then add the trail edge, and just make a through cut? (basically eliminate any chance of misalignment from having made the cut prior to attaching the edging, and i believe i would use it to make full through cuts)

-- Scott

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2777 days


#14 posted 03-01-2008 05:08 PM

Thank you so much

Scott
As you noticed, I’m using runners (rails) that are narrower than the miter slot.

I was afraid that if I’ll push the 3mm (1/8”) plywood in the kerf without the front fence, it would “open” the kerf and I would have some “play” of the runners…but, if you are using “tight fit” runners, no problem…

Regards
niki

View jcees's profile

jcees

948 posts in 2496 days


#15 posted 03-01-2008 05:46 PM

Good one! I dig the homemade triangles. I used nearly the same process when I built one of mine. I used double stick tape instead of super glue, I like your idea better. Also, your methods are sound and embody what I’ve always strove for in my own work; work precisely and slim your tolerances to nill whenever possible. Working this way takes the worry out of being close. Great tutorial, it’s a keeper and I’ve added it to my favs.

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

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