LumberJocks

Forming a long deep plough

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Sandy posted 2509 days ago 1112 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sandy's profile

Sandy

137 posts in 2509 days


2509 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: plough dado router table saw shopsmith radial arm

I need to form 1” deep, 3/4” wide, 28” long stopped plough cuts along one side of the lenght of each of four red oak legs (3 1/2” square) to receive oak plywood. The plough cuts will go from the top of each leg down, and stop about 6” from the bottom of each leg. While I have a variety of tools capable of making the cut (router table, plunge router, table saw, ShopSmith, and radial arm saw), I was wondering what the consensus regarding the best and safest way to make the cuts. Personally, I am leaning toward using the router table, but there’s a whole bunch of wood to remove, and I want the cuts to be “right on”. Oh, BTW, I mentioned the ShopSmith for two reasons—First, I can use it as a drill press to remove (with a Forstner bit) a lot of the waste, and second I can use it as an overhead router, although I don’t really like that idea. Thoughts?

Sandy


8 replies so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34844 posts in 2985 days


#1 posted 2509 days ago

Sandy

I’ve used the router table and a spiral upcut router bit. Get one in 1/2” size and work your way through carefully. I’d cut about 3/16” in a pass. and make sure that you cut the closest to the fence first and then move your fence. You don’t want the second cut to be a climb cut. It will yank the wood out of your hands.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2652 days


#2 posted 2509 days ago

With that much wood to remove I’d start with the table saw and a dado set. Hog out as much wood as possible using the strongest tool in the shop. The table saw will also give you a “right on” cut.

I’d run the saw cut up as close to the end of the groove as possible. Then I’d finish up with either chisels, Forstner bit followed by chisels, or router table followed by chisels.

1 inch deep by 3/4 inch wide is a pretty heavy cut. You might consider multiple passes, even with a table saw. Many passes would be required with a router.

View Sandy's profile

Sandy

137 posts in 2509 days


#3 posted 2509 days ago

Karson,

I’ve noted that there are both spiral “upcut” and sprial “downcut” bits available. Which is preferable for use on a router table?

Any thoughts on predrilling to remove some of the waste from the middle of the cut? Perhaps with overlapping 3/8” or 7/16” Forstner drills?

Oh, BTW, my router table is one I designed for use with a 17” LS Positioner (Incra) Fence, so it’s right on as far as “moving the fence” goes.

... and, Colorado, I don’t have a dado set for my table saw (Delta 10” Unisaw w/ 220 v, so you’re right it is the heftiest thing in my shop), but I do have a “wobbler” that I’ve had for a long time and used on my radial arm saw. Thoughts on using that one? I just don’t like te idea of that wide spinning, exposed blade, though, especially that high up, particularly since I want to be able to “stop” the cut short of the end of the leg.

Sandy

View Karson's profile

Karson

34844 posts in 2985 days


#4 posted 2509 days ago

The upcut bit is used to pull the wood chips out of the cut it is making. It’s basically bringing up the wood chips.

The down cut is pushing the wood chips down into the cut. You must remember that the router bit is moving sideways so the chips are not all packed in the hole you are cutting.

But there is another purpose. The down cut gives you a nice clean cut surface, because the bit is cutting down from the surface.

If you are cutting all the way through your wood, like routing a slot in 1/4” wood then a downcut is smooth on the side closest to the router and a rougher cut on the side away from the router. Where an upcut bit would give you the smooth cut on the side away from the router and a rough cut on the closest to the router.

Rough and smooth is kind of subjective. It’s not a ragged edge but it could leave some burrs and possible some chipout. So it really depends on your application.

When I buy my bits a buy a full set of all sizes and both upcut and downcut so I have the one I need when I’m ready to cut.

Here are some that I’ve used. http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_solid_sets.html#7_px_spiral_set_anchor

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2652 days


#5 posted 2509 days ago

Sandy, Even without a dado set I’d still go with the table saw to hog out the bulk of the waste. I’d do multiple passes over a single ripping blade. Look at the size of your table saw motor and the size of your router motor. The table saw is the clear winner for power.

If you try to use the router you’re looking at lots of cuts, wear on your router bit just taking out waste, and too much time and effort going back and forth taking little cuts.

If you decide to use the table saw with a single blade you decide how clean you want the bottom of the groove. If you want the entire groove clean and flat then saw out the waste slightly undersize and then do a finish pass with the router. If you decide that the saw bottom is going to be hidden by an oak panel you can ignore the saw marks. I’m assuming you are using an ABT blade, not a flat tooth blade. The saw with a clean sharp blade will get the sides more than good enough. With a sharp blade you should be able to make the 3/4 inch deep cuts w/o a problem. Now you’re talking maybe 10 passes total with a 1/8 inch kerf blade.

If you go with the router, with a 1/2 inch bit, you’re going to need 3 passes per depth of cut to get overlap, and assuming you hog between 1/8 and 1/4 depth per cut you’re talking 12 to 18 passes. And they’re going to be relatively slow passes compared to the table saw.

I’d still rather put that wear and tear on my table saw and blades than my comparatively small router and bits.

I think a dado set would be the ideal answer then you could hog it all out in a couple passes. Without a good dado set I’d go with a single ripping blade. Personally I would NOT use a wobble blade. I dont trust or like wobble blades, not something I’d ever use.

Doing the forstner bit then routing just sounds painfully slow and tedious. I’m not sure it would be that much better than just hogging out the waste with the router alone.

View edp's profile

edp

109 posts in 2545 days


#6 posted 2506 days ago

Well it is time for you to pony up for the dado blade that you don’t have. You’ll be surprised at the number of uses youo will find for it. By the way, the slot need not be the full width of the plywood. You could cut a haunched tennon on the plywood to engage a narrower slot.

-- Come on in, the beer is cold and the wood is dry. www.crookedlittletree.com

View Sandy's profile

Sandy

137 posts in 2509 days


#7 posted 2506 days ago

Ok, all… I was starting to think it was time to get a “real” dado set, although I have to say that I never had even the slightest bit of problem using the “wobbler” on my radial arm saw.

So, ladies and gents, which dado set do you suggest that I get to use with my Delta Unisaw (50”, 220v, with a Beisemeyer Fence)? Next, what is the safest way to use it? How do I cut a stopped plough?

Feel free, also, to suggest whatever I’m missing here, as safety and efficiency, in that order, are my primary concerns…

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12237 posts in 2681 days


#8 posted 2506 days ago

Some posts

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/374
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/877
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/878

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase