LumberJocks

Condo woodworking?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Chinitorama posted 06-26-2009 07:54 AM 4696 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Chinitorama's profile

Chinitorama

105 posts in 2758 days


06-26-2009 07:54 AM

Hi all,

Does anyone here do woodwork in their condo/apartment? My girlfriend and I just bought a place and would like the spare room to be a space for doing artistic things. As we are on the top floor there’s a concern over noise etc., so I would be sticking to hand tools which is fine by me. I was wondering how LJs in similar digs have handled woodworking at home.

Thanks,
-J.


11 replies so far

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2733 days


#1 posted 06-26-2009 01:00 PM

What kind of woodworking will you be doing? Boxes, furniture, etc?

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View CanadaJeff's profile

CanadaJeff

207 posts in 3069 days


#2 posted 06-26-2009 02:58 PM

I’m currently living in an apartment and woodwork all the time.
Three things to consider:
1) You do have to be careful of noise and if your using power tools or make a lot of sawdust or shavings be aware that debris and sawdust will fall to the apartment below. Wind on Balconies tend to push sawdust around easily.
2) At least for me I’m working on a 40 foot balcony, but space is an issue, it can get a little irratating having to setup for one tool and than take down and setup for another.
3) THE MOST IMPORTANT THING (particularly if your married or have a girlfriend). The wood debris you create is easily carried into the apartment. I have been yelled at many times, for walking in the apartment after the floors were swept and realizing that a 1/2 cup of sawdust was attached to the bottom of my shoes!

I guess overall its just respect for those around you and those you live with. The upside is it defiantely takes care of some of the bordem of apartment life!

View Chinitorama's profile

Chinitorama

105 posts in 2758 days


#3 posted 06-27-2009 03:59 AM

My intention is to make smaller objects (boxes, mirror frames, etc.) and finally get around to trying my hand at guitar making. Anything larger or requiring power tools I can do at the shop where I work. I intend to have a bench and do most of my stuff indoors as our balcony is tiny.

On the plus side, being on the top floor we’ve got a wood burning fireplace! So long offcuts and shavings!

-J.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#4 posted 06-27-2009 04:05 AM

How about carving

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Chinitorama's profile

Chinitorama

105 posts in 2758 days


#5 posted 06-27-2009 05:24 AM

Carving is another thing I’d like to do more of for sure.

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2733 days


#6 posted 06-27-2009 01:38 PM

Well my situation is sort of the same (but not really). I have a small “shop” in the basement right below my 5 year old son’s room and the real shop is out in the garage.

The garage doesn’t have a ceiling yet (or insulation) and working out there in the summer or winter is pretty much impossible (will be 99 degrees today). So, I put a bench downstairs and do my veneering down there. It’s 2×4 construction bolted to the wall with legs in front. The top is a sheet of 3/4” plywood and then everything is covered with 3/4 T&G oak flooring. I sanded it all and threw on a coat of shellac. It’s sized so that when I find a cheap kitchen drawer unit, I can just slide it under there, shim it and remove one of the legs (yeah, I’m cheap and won’t just go buy one). Then I can store my veneer flitches in the drawers instead of the big Tupperware totes they’re in now.

I hand sand everything down there and pretty much work with hand tools exclusively. The only “power” tool I have down there is a compressor for pin nailing but it’s so quiet that you can’t even hear it in the next room. Eventually though, I’m going to run an air hose from the garage as I put in an extra 3/4” conduit when we built it – one of my few examples of forward thinking…

If you’re going to do any powered sanding, I’d invest in a really quiet shop vac and maybe keep an air cleaner running whenever you’re working so you don’t end up with dust everywhere. Definitely take the time to make nice tool racks, think about storage, etc. Since it’s part of your home, it should be as nice a place to spend time in as any other room.

One thing to think about is transmitted noise from the bench. When you’re chiseling out dovetails, each mallet hit will be transmitted through to the floor. Explain to your downstairs neighbor what you’re going to be doing and ask if you can listen in the room below your shop. Have your girlfriend hit a hammer on a piece of 2×4 on the floor and see how much sound is transmitted through. You might need to put some carpet or something under the bench feet to absorb the noise if there is any. At Christmas, give them a nice box or something to make up for any inconveniences might cause – they’ll be a lot less likely to complain then. Kind of like in college – the best way to keep the neighbors from calling the cops about your party was to invite them to it.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3620 days


#7 posted 06-29-2009 08:08 PM

I remember a member saying that most of his work was done in a hotel room because he travel for his work all the time—if he wanted to build something then it had to be done on the road.

We have another member who’s “shop” is in the attic of their house.

Another member (a highly skilled craftsman) does all of his work in the living room. (all hand tools, if I remember correctly).

Unfortunately I can’t remember which members they are.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3044 days


#8 posted 06-29-2009 10:35 PM

sorry double post Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3044 days


#9 posted 06-29-2009 10:36 PM

A small wood lathe, and scroll saw, should not be too noisy check one out before you buy though to make sure your happy.Regards Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Karson's profile

Karson

35034 posts in 3860 days


#10 posted 06-29-2009 11:36 PM

Good luck. And keep happy neighbours. You don’t want a condo association breathing down your neck.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3132 days


#11 posted 06-29-2009 11:57 PM

I would try hand tool woodworking? like handsaws, handplanes, measuring tools, and things of that nature. You can buy S2S stock and do all of your cutting with handsaws and smoothing with hand planes.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com