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veneer glue optuons...help deciding

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 03-25-2015 08:45 PM 861 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

757 posts in 1462 days


03-25-2015 08:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer glue

I have some table legs for an end table that I made by laminating two .75” boards to make one 1.5” thick. I would like to put a peice of veneer over the side with the glue line. I spent some tme reading at joewoodworker.com and it seems my two best options are either the pressure bonding glue or the iron on stuff.

Based on your experience, LJers, which would you use in my case? I would lean towards the iron on, but am not sure what kind of glue line that might leave.

The legs have a 3” straight side at the top where the aprons will attach, and then tapers down to the feet. So the veneer will have a gradual transition to cover there. The veneer i have is raw/non backed. Both the veneer and legs are cherry.

Thanks
-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


7 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 03-25-2015 08:47 PM

I can vouch for Titebond Cold Press Glue, but it is a dark brown glue, so the line may be visible. Really, you can use normal yellow glue, but there is a slightly higher risk of bleed through.

You can also use liquid hide glue as well. Hot hide glue of course is an option, but for only one project might not be worth it.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#2 posted 03-25-2015 09:42 PM

My vote would be hide glue. Personally I would use hot but a good liquid like Old Brown Glue is easier if you aren’t familiar with hot hide glue’s idiosyncrasies.
My reasons:
No clamping required if hammer veneered (hot only)
No glue creep as it is a hard set glue unlike the PVAs.
Reversibility.
No finish blocking problems if excess glue is cleaned up with water.

Second choice would be Urea Formaldehyde, another hard set glue but it requires high clamping pressure.

If you don’t mind expanding / contracting glue lines and finish interference, you can go with a more “modern” glue but if it is an important piece use something better. (Just my opinion.)

You might also consider a base veneer, preferably thicker, under the finish veneer. The underlying glue line may very well telegraph through if you are using commercial 1/42” material.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#3 posted 03-26-2015 11:06 AM

I also like the hide glue idea. Using Old Brown Glue (kinda pricey, short shelf life) would be a good idea though it does have a long clamp time. The reason I would choose it is the finish part that Shipwreck mentioned. No interference at all.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2598 days


#4 posted 04-01-2015 03:46 PM

Just use regular titebond, with a caul to provide even pressure. Fastest and easiest method, with no glue line.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#5 posted 04-01-2015 03:54 PM



Just use regular titebond, with a caul to provide even pressure. Fastest and easiest method, with no glue line.

- Ger21

Negative. Tends to bleed through porous veneers and interferes with finishing. Had that happen on a few occasions.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#6 posted 04-01-2015 07:09 PM

......... also has problems with expanding/contracting glue lines. Veneering really should be done with hard setting glues like hide glues and urea formaldehydes.
I used PVA glues on a few veneer projects before I started using hide glue. I sure wish I could go back and change them.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1462 days


#7 posted 04-01-2015 10:37 PM

Joe from Joe Woodworker.com suggested the cold press glue he offers, over the urea glue and heat glue for my application. I bought some, and will experiment with it hopefully this weekend.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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