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Forum topic by BroncoBrian posted 03-23-2015 10:42 PM 946 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


03-23-2015 10:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: workbench wall-mount

Does anyone know of a track system that can hold a legit bench top?

I want to come off the wall perpendicular with the wall side attached. The legs would be very sturdy and fold out. The value, is that there is a lot of open space, locations for vices, and when I store it, I only have to fold under one set of legs and then slide the heavy bench up the wall and rest it on a bracket to keep it off the floor.

The tough parts seems to be getting a track fixed with a hinge of some type to fold out the right direction and for that all to sit firmly.

Rough drawing here:

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me


14 replies so far

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2449 days


#1 posted 03-23-2015 10:54 PM

I think this ought to about cover it.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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pjones46

986 posts in 2107 days


#2 posted 03-23-2015 10:54 PM

Try 80-20 The Industrial Erector Set® and look through their catalogue.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


#3 posted 03-23-2015 11:17 PM

Ripthorn – that is interesting but not what I am looking for. I see a lot of good uses for it, but assembling drawers and many other tasks would have a lot of gravity to compete with.

pjones46 – There seem to be some good possibilities in that link. I will look through it.

Has anyone tried anything like this or have pictures of a similar design?

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

387 posts in 2241 days


#4 posted 03-24-2015 12:15 AM

Brian, Why do you need a track to mount the end of the bench top to? Are you planning on changing the height on that one end at some point? I don’t get it.

Lag bolt a ledger board to the wall and mount a couple of very heavy duty hinges to it and the top. Done.

Wayne

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


#5 posted 03-24-2015 03:21 AM

Wayne,

It is to be able to store the table away. The table should be very heavy so picking it up would be almost impossible, but pushing it up and sliding it out of the way takes a lot of weight off, also the wall side is fixed to the track so it would be able to just rest on a block above the floor.

Anyone else see the value in this. Flat storage, one-person move.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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ic3ss

387 posts in 2241 days


#6 posted 03-24-2015 04:19 AM

Interesting concept, I’d like to see it when you get done. Seems to me that if the top is that heavy, pushing it up the track would be about as hard ad lifting it. Maybe I still don’t get it.

Wayne

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7917 posts in 1844 days


#7 posted 03-24-2015 05:40 AM

I think I get it. He wants to leave vises and things attached to the top which would prevent it from sitting flat against the wall. So he wants to slide the back end up and leave the top facing out. And yeah, it will be heavy but you could attach counterweights and make it light was a feather.

The rack doesn’t have to be super heavy duty if it doesn’t support all the weight. A ledger board at the bottom to support the table up or down will take the load off. Then build a slide from slotted maple runners and hex bolts.

Another idea
http://www.benchsolution.com/products/workbench/

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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NoThanks

798 posts in 993 days


#8 posted 03-24-2015 01:55 PM

Here is a simple idea. You would have to figure out your spacing away from the wall so that it would pivot, and some stops at the bottom, but could work.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View JayT's profile

JayT

4782 posts in 1675 days


#9 posted 03-24-2015 02:07 PM

I think I get it. He wants to leave vises and things attached to the top which would prevent it from sitting flat against the wall. So he wants to slide the back end up and leave the top facing out.

That’s my understanding, too, but I’m questioning the thinking. A woodworking vise is even with the top of the bench and has the extra ‘stuff’ hanging below. That means the track would have to be mounted quite a way off the wall. In that case, a simple hinge at the bottom would be better to get it out of the way for storage,, as the top could fold up closer to the wall.

If wanting the top facing out for appearance or because the bench will have machinist vises or some tools permanently mounted above the top, then that’s a different story.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 982 days


#10 posted 03-24-2015 02:32 PM

It seems that if you were to hinge at the wall and flip the working surface up against the wall, that would require less effort to fold up. The hinge would support weight which would lessen the load on your side. If you have tracks for the wall side to slide up the wall and the opposite end is down you would have to lift the weight of the entire top.

Am I imagining this correctly?

View mrg's profile

mrg

659 posts in 2463 days


#11 posted 03-24-2015 02:36 PM

How about a ledger board with a piano hinge set up? You flip the bench up fold the legs in and maybe use two pins one in each side to lock it in place when folded up.

Another idea edge of the bench against the wall make your own hinge with rod and bearings. Put three bearings in blocks run a rod/pipe etc through and that acts as the hinge.

-- mrg

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#12 posted 03-24-2015 02:39 PM

What if you just hinged the top to the wall/ledger, and hung a double, or triple, pulley on the wall above it. Install a heavy duty hook on the far end of the bench, and a caribiner on the pulley rope. When you’re ready to store the bench, hook the rope to the far end and use the pulley to hoist it up. The pulley will greatly reduce the effort required. You’ll need some sort of latch (sliding bolt?) to keep the thing from slamming back down. Their shouldn’t be too much force exerted outward on the latch, as most of the force is directed downward onto the hinge.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Notw

469 posts in 1217 days


#13 posted 03-24-2015 03:01 PM

When I did mine I used standard hinges from BORG into the studs and then had a ledger board against the wall to support the weight of the back side of the bench when it was down. The legs are attached to the front with carriage bolts and swing to the side of the bench when up. I used at eye bolt and a carabiner to hold it against the wall when up
Click for details

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


#14 posted 03-24-2015 11:54 PM



I think I get it. He wants to leave vises and things attached to the top which would prevent it from sitting flat against the wall. So he wants to slide the back end up and leave the top facing out. And yeah, it will be heavy but you could attach counterweights and make it light was a feather.

The rack doesn t have to be super heavy duty if it doesn t support all the weight. A ledger board at the bottom to support the table up or down will take the load off. Then build a slide from slotted maple runners and hex bolts.

Another idea
http://www.benchsolution.com/products/workbench/

- Rick M.

That is right Rick. I can add about 24-28” more to the length by hanging it and sliding it up the track while not ever allowing the bench to rest on the floor (dirty, wet, plus it would have to have a healthy lean). The bench might only be 8-10” with track, legs and space behind the tracks and flat.

Hinging the bench from the bottom limits the length by only giving me the 36” inch floor height up to the ceiling. I

I know this would be heavy, but manageable and you cannot drop it back if one side is attached to the wall. It would be more of a push motion, less lift.

Just hinging it and flipping it up would

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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