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Help identifying mystery jointer

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Forum topic by Craig Brown posted 03-23-2015 03:06 PM 998 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Craig Brown

18 posts in 632 days


03-23-2015 03:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer

I bought this jointer from a guy on Craigslist. I can’t find any documentation on it. Any information would be greatly appreciated! The guy I bought it from told me it runs on 220. But according to a salesman at Home Depot, the plug could only have been put in a 110 outlet. All the outlets at Home Depot that fit this plug were 110. 220 outlets had the “prong” to the right of the ground in a horizontal position. I know many of these things can be wired for 110 or 220 so maybe the guy I bought it from was mistaken. He is a cabinet maker and has many machines. He could have been confused. BTW: Watching the two kids (the cabinet maker’s son and a friend) carry it into my basement (via a very steep bulkhead) was the scariest thing I’ve ever seen. There was only room for one man at the bottom. I’m not wealthy, but I gave them a $100 tip for not raising my homeowners insurance!


21 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#1 posted 03-23-2015 03:18 PM

That plug is 220.
Dont know about the mfg.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#2 posted 03-23-2015 03:37 PM

The Home Depot guy is mistaken – -

That is a 220 plug notice your plate says “2 phase”

Basically it is 110 volt X2…. that the black and the white are EACH 110V Hot wires.
There is no neutral.
you have 2 hots and a ground.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMgwZDtR4tw

at the 7:40 second mark you will see he is putting in the receptical you want for that plug.

Notice that at first glance – it the 125 and the 250V plugs 5-20P (125Volt) and 6-20P (250V) seem the same. But in fact with the ground plug… they are mirror images (just as your right hand wont really go into the left glove)
P is plug… goes then to a 6-20R (Recepticle)
Most tools come with no plug… many with no cord at all. So there are a lot of combinations out there.
If you don’t feel comfortable, have an electrician install the receptical… and plug if they recommend a different set-up.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View JayT's profile

JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#3 posted 03-23-2015 03:38 PM



That plug is 220.
Dont know about the mfg.

- SirIrb

+1. That’s a NEMA 6-20 plug, which is 220. There is a 110 (NEMA 5-20) that has the vertical and horizontal plugs on the opposite sides, that’s probably what you were seeing in Home Depot.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#4 posted 03-23-2015 03:44 PM

Now ask me if I ever hooked up a 220 like that to 110. Why, yes, yes I have. It will spin at about 50rpm. I am a design engineer not an electrical engineer. The lesson learned: If the plug looks funny it looks funny for a darn good reason.

For reasons such as this Home Depot is dead to me. You hear me, home depot? You are dead to me. You do not exist. I would drive across town to avoid you. Have some standards in your hiring, for the love of God. I worked in a lumber yard as a teen. I know about being in over your head. Thats when you say “Let me get someone who can answer that better than I can”. Geez, honesty will garner more appreciation than burning down a house.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Craig Brown's profile

Craig Brown

18 posts in 632 days


#5 posted 03-23-2015 05:26 PM

It is true that I don’t have experience with voltages that are not typical for a home. If you look at the photo of the jointer, behind the jointer is a pizza oven. It runs at 208 volts. That was clearly beyond me. But this does not appear too tricky. Please see attached photo of a junction box. I believe that I can wire a 220 outlet to that. Only thing is that a 50 amp surge would fry the motor. So I need to attach a panel with a 20 am breaker … right?

I still have no idea who made this jointer or what the controls do. There does not seem to be a manual anywhere.

Thanks for the help!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#6 posted 03-23-2015 05:31 PM

Yep. Change breaker to a 2 pole 20A. Might have to pigtail #12 leads off the big wires because it won’t fit under a recept screw.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Craig Brown's profile

Craig Brown

18 posts in 632 days


#7 posted 03-23-2015 05:59 PM

Looking at the breaker box, the power (running to the junction box) is two pole. I assume that because the electrician marked the junction box 50 amp, what ever the two pole breaker is, it is allowing 50 amps to reach this box. The box runs to a transformer. The transformer supplies 208 volts to an oven. Although the oven will never be used at the same time as the jointer, I can’t change the breakers (or the transformer will not get enough power).

I guess that I need to run wires from the junction box (at 50 amps) to another panel. In that panel I could put 20 amp breakers. I could then connect 220 outlets to the second panel. The main box is full, so I can’t just run a new wire directly to the outlet. If I was to buy a saw that runs 220, I could then power it from this same panel. Is this correct?

View JayT's profile

JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#8 posted 03-23-2015 06:09 PM

From the number of questions you have, my best piece of advice is to hire an electrician. Electrical is not that hard to learn, but mistakes can be pricey and fatal. Much better off to let a pro do the hookup if you aren’t 100% sure of what you are doing.

208 volts means three phase, which is usually for commercial applications. That means your ‘transformer’ is actually a phase converter.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13466 posts in 1319 days


#9 posted 03-23-2015 06:43 PM

I would say you’re correct. You cannot change the breaker in the main panel, because you still need to provide 50a to the oven. So you need a subpanel. My question I what that junction box is doing. One wire in and one out. Could be that the wire was too short and they needed to make a junction and add on. What’s under the cover. I just reran all the electrical to my shop. I only had 10 gauge wire going out there and it’s about 80’. I kept blowing breakers. My biggest expense was for the wire, but you don’t need much. A panel was $20 and two pole breakers were $10 each. You should be able to do it for less than $100. Probably for $200 you could have the peace of mind of an electrician.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Craig Brown's profile

Craig Brown

18 posts in 632 days


#10 posted 03-23-2015 07:10 PM

Thanks for the responses! I ask a lot of questions because I want to understand. It is not a money issue. I will hire an electrician if I am not sure in my head. I design low voltage gadgets and learn by doing. If I shutoff the breakers and verify with my multimeter, I am not going to get hurt. As JayT said, the juction box was put in to power a device that is not normally in a home. It is a phase converter. It was a hack done by a Master Electrician. I guess I will ask him his opinion. He will probably insist that he put in the panel himself.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#11 posted 03-23-2015 07:34 PM

I believe that I can wire a 220 outlet to that. Only thing is that a 50 amp surge would fry the motor.

Wrong. Just because you have 50A available, does not mean it’s going to somehow force 50A into the machine and fry the motor. If that were the case, then your >1A light bulbs would be popping all over the house because you have them plugged into 15 (or 20) amp circuits. The device will draw as much or as little current as it needs, up to the amount available on that circuit (and actually, it could draw a little more for a brief period of time depending on the breaker). The circuit breaker is only to protect the wiring, not the device.

So I need to attach a panel with a 20 am breaker … right?*

That would be a good idea, but not for the reason you seem to think.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: IF that first picture is of it sitting in your basement, it looks like you have a 220V outlet on the wall (for a dryer perhaps?) to the left of the machine that isn’t being used. If so, all you would need to do is change the plug on your machine and use that outlet (which should be 30A).

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View mrg's profile

mrg

659 posts in 2462 days


#12 posted 03-23-2015 07:53 PM

Do you have enough room in your panel to add a 220 breaker and run a new line for the jointer? If not, I would have an electrician do it.

-- mrg

View Craig Brown's profile

Craig Brown

18 posts in 632 days


#13 posted 03-23-2015 08:40 PM

Thanks. Yeah, I meant a power surge that would not trip a breaker. Otherwise it would only happen if the oven was running (which is normally unplugged).

The dryer is 220 but it is pre 1996. It uses the old style of outlet. I went to Grainger to get a pigtail to fit this type of outlet. It is available in 6’ length, so this would be more trouble then the junction box. I am going to speak with an electrician :-)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#14 posted 03-23-2015 08:54 PM

Thanks. Yeah, I meant a power surge that would not trip a breaker. Otherwise it would only happen if the oven was running (which is normally unplugged).

The dryer is 220 but it is pre 1996. It uses the old style of outlet. I went to Grainger to get a pigtail to fit this type of outlet. It is available in 6 length, so this would be more trouble then the junction box. I am going to speak with an electrician :-)

A surge still should not hurt the motor, unless you are talking something like a lightning strike :)

And I don’t see how putting a new plug on the cord would be more trouble than installing a new junction box? You can get the correct plug for your 3-prong outlet at the BORG for about $20 and just replace the plug that is currently on the machine (not the whole cord.. just the plug on the end)... or if that cord isn’t long enough, you can get some wire while you are there and make a cord as long as you need. But if you have an electrician handy, go for it :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

605 posts in 2546 days


#15 posted 03-24-2015 12:09 AM

It looks exactly like a General ‘480’ we had lots of years ago.

I remember it well. I got pretty good at straightening out 16 foot 8/4 boards on it….....by myself.lol!

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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