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Forum topic by vr6slper posted 06-21-2009 11:27 PM 1134 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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vr6slper

9 posts in 2825 days


06-21-2009 11:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: refurbishing finishing sanding question

A relative gave me and my wife a dining room set. Long story short we want to change its color (see pics below). We are looking to make the furniture look medium dark brown so that it will match the rest of our furniture in the house. Any recommendations on how to go about doing this. We would greatly appreciate it.
Chair
Chair

We would like the end product to look like this
finish

Thanks for the help,

Danny


13 replies so far

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 3204 days


#1 posted 06-21-2009 11:55 PM

You would have to get all of the old finish off, before it would take another stain or dye evenly. You might want to think about sanding it down and using a garnet or amber shellac, if that’s the tone of color you’re looking for.

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#2 posted 06-22-2009 12:03 AM

The only way to change the color that would be fairly easy would be to lightly scuff-sand the set and paint it. But like Tim said, you’ll have to sand the whole thing entirely down to bare wood if you want to be able to stain it a darker color and preserve the natural grain of the wood.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#3 posted 06-22-2009 12:06 AM

Hey Danny
I’m with Tim. Remove the old finish and wipe down with naphtha and apply at least a 1lb cut of shellac to seal
of any remaining impurities and apply the color you want. I like wiping stain and a clear coat. but you could use a water base dye. If using dye you can sneak up on the color you want by applying a very diluted color to start an repeated coats as necessary. you should do a test in hidden areas first to see what you think about the color. If you use dye make sure you have rubber gloves on or your hands will be dyed intill it wears off.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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vr6slper

9 posts in 2825 days


#4 posted 06-22-2009 12:10 AM

Where can I buy the products needed. Recommend brands would be great. I don’t want to buy the wrong products.
Thanks!

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 06-22-2009 12:21 AM

Danny
It depends what your going to use and how close suppliers are. You can order on line, go to a box store(lowes or Home depot) Paint supply stores like shewin williams. Do you know which method your going to try?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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vr6slper

9 posts in 2825 days


#6 posted 06-22-2009 12:29 AM

Jim,

I would like to use the best method to get the wood to look like the other piece of furniture above. Basically I will do what is recommend.

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#7 posted 06-22-2009 12:48 AM

Danny

In all finishing is a bit of trial and error approach. If I were going to try the easiest way first I would go with some amber shellac as Tim suggested it’s easy to apply and if you want to go to the next step using a wiping stain or dye you can go right over it after a light sanding with 320 sand paper or finer. I would probably see if there is a” Woodcraft store” near you they would carry all of the materials except maybe the wiping stain.
If your buying supplies for plan A and Plan B ,you will need sand paper 120, 150, 220, and 320 grit ether sheets or for a random orbital sander if you have one. You will need garnet shellac,denatured alcohol, dye in the color you chose (general finishes is a good brand) rags, containers to mix the dye and shellac in (Metal or glass jars.) I’m sure they can help if Ive forgotten any thing.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#8 posted 06-22-2009 01:00 AM

Danny, I am sure the pros above have given you sound advice. I would just ad one thing. If there is a piece of the dining set, a table leaf for example or any part that won’t be seen much, it might be a good idea to use it as a test piece to make sure you first that you will be getting the result you are looking for before committing yourself to the full job. Good luck with your project.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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vr6slper

9 posts in 2825 days


#9 posted 06-22-2009 01:02 AM

I just checked the closest Wood Craft store is 1.5 hours away :( There are alot of Home Depots and Lowes here though. Sorry that I am asking so many questions but could you give me a procedure (how to) on how to get this project completed. I never refinished furniture.

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#10 posted 06-22-2009 01:14 AM

Well you could order from woodcraft on line. I’m not sure HD or Lowes will have garnet shellac. I think that it would be more help to check out a book or dvd on you tube. I think it’s a bit much to explain here.

http://www.amazon.com/Refinishing-Furniture-Bob-Flexner-Woodworking/dp/630191886X

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFh_AGspaEQ

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#11 posted 06-22-2009 01:34 AM

i have had to touch up repaired laquered furniture at times , ( test for laquer , by using laquer thiner on unseen place ,
it will desolve the finish coat if it is laquer ) .
if it does not desolve the finish , it is some other finish , but most comercial finished furniture is laquer , as it is easy to work with , and any sanding dust will desolve in next coat , and not leave dust motes that look like little mountains in the finish .
if it is laquer , you can get dyes that can be used in laquer , and scuff the old finish , and spray new tinted laquer over it .i have only done this in repairs to old furniture and in selected spots to touch up the problem area ,
and you need to maybe see a refinishing site or find a school or finishing course where you can learn the basics .
also you want to be carefull that there is no wax on the furniture , as it will mess with any finish .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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vr6slper

9 posts in 2825 days


#12 posted 06-22-2009 03:25 AM

Guys what is the purpose of the shellac? Is it a filler?

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tenontim

2131 posts in 3204 days


#13 posted 06-23-2009 03:50 AM

Danny, I use shellac on projects like this, for getting a darker color over something lighter, or in your case, something that already has a finish. Like already mentioned, I would sand the entire project down, wipe it down with thinner, then start wiping on the shellac. It dries real fast so you’ll have to roll up a rag, and keep it wet. You’ll only be able to wipe on a thin coat at one time, so be patient. Garnet shellac will let you sneak up on the color you’re looking for.
Someone suggested that you use a table leaf or some such piece and try out your finish. You can top coat the shellac with some wiping finish, such as Watco or wiping varnish. Usually its not suggested that you put poly over shellac.
To answer your question, shellac is a sealer, not a filler. Since it comes in different colors, and can be colored with appropriate dyes, it’s good for refinishing. Zinzer makes shellac, already mixed, but it only comes in clear and amber, which I think might be a little light. If you have a paint store near you, they may put some colorant in the shellac for you, to get near the color you’re looking for.

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