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Drawknife want to buy

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Forum topic by robdem posted 03-21-2015 08:12 PM 874 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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robdem

378 posts in 2072 days


03-21-2015 08:12 PM

Have a project coming up and I will need a drawknife put don’t know witch one to buy any help and recommendation would be helpful .i am going to use it to make a board look like it was a live edge since can’t afford the real think thanks for help


10 replies so far

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#1 posted 03-21-2015 09:09 PM

Depends on budget, obviously. If you have $170 to spare you might consider Lie-Nielsen, which is based on a Witherby. Personally I have two flea market finds (about $15 each) that work well and only required a minor amount of tuning up. But if you need one right away for a project you may not be able to wait until you stumble across a used one somewhere.
I also have this French-style one that I bought new, really like it a lot and encourage you to take a look:
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=44502&cat=1,130,43332 The shorter one at 13 inches is plenty big.
Steer clear of ones that are made for peeling logs.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Picklehead

1018 posts in 1396 days


#2 posted 03-21-2015 09:40 PM

Flexcut drawknives come razor sharp and ready to go. Not many tools you can say that about.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2451 days


#3 posted 03-21-2015 09:44 PM

Is this something you anticipate using/doing a lot? That will have a large effect on final choice. I got one in a box lot of stuff a few years ago and have never used it, so I’m glad I never put the money down on one.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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unbob

719 posts in 1370 days


#4 posted 03-22-2015 12:14 AM

The drawknife is something that not very many use these days. Witherby made a variety of draw knives. This is one that is not reproduced. It would be very hard to do. The blade had a double curve, and is hollow ground on the back, with adjustable handles. A precision cutting instrument, not a log peeler.

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robdem

378 posts in 2072 days


#5 posted 03-22-2015 06:32 PM

Guys thanks for help going to buy the lee valley draw knife price isn’t to bad . Just wondering how much of a learning curve there is is it like using a spoke shave .

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unbob

719 posts in 1370 days


#6 posted 03-22-2015 07:03 PM

Sort of like a spoke shave. But, no built in depth control.
The knife can be used with the bevel toward you or away, depends on the wood. Of course, you control the blade angle also.
Working some scraps of various woods, I got he hang of it pretty quick. I like the tool for working ragged board edges to the point hand planes take over. The tool can work a rough board edge quickly, and can work a hickory tool handle faster then a spoke shave….or get it to a point the spoke shave can finish it.

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robdem

378 posts in 2072 days


#7 posted 03-22-2015 07:48 PM

Thanks unbob for help guess will just have to get it and practice on some scrap wood .

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#8 posted 03-22-2015 08:02 PM

Unbob’s advice is good. I’d add that generally you can get a better cut if you skew the drawknife and take a slicing cut – so as well as pulling toward yourself you slide the blade from side to side.
You can use a drawknife with the bevel up or down, although bevel down is difficult if the back of the knife is dead flat. You’ll just have to play with it to see what works for you.
Nothing like using a spokeshave, but I don’t think you’ll have too much trouble, it’s not really that difficult a tool to use, as long as it’s pretty sharp. Even more than with a plane, grain direction is crucial.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1360 days


#9 posted 03-22-2015 10:04 PM

I’ve got a Witherby with a curved blade. I’d rather have a flat blade, which is easier to sharpen. Really like the drawknife, although I don’t see myself using it on anything but large slabs. I’m sure the LN is as nice as anything they make but unless you’re going to be using it a lot, I vote go vintage.

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1154 posts in 1100 days


#10 posted 03-22-2015 10:27 PM

I picked mine up at garage sales for like $5.

I have used mine for both spindle work, and also removing back.

Getting the hang is quick and (sometimes easy, sometimes not so easy :-( )
when starting out, wear leather. I use a HF welders apron still.

I recommend starting bevel down, but you can progress to bevel up for smoothing.

-- Jeff NJ

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