LumberJocks

Oak for outdoor furniture

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Muzzy17 posted 03-21-2015 12:23 AM 684 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Muzzy17's profile

Muzzy17

40 posts in 786 days


03-21-2015 12:23 AM

I am in the process of getting my hands on some oak that I’m wanting to build some outdoor furniture with. What would you all recommend for sealing it good to protect it from the weather?

-- Deep rooted Southern Boy and set in my ways!


9 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#1 posted 03-21-2015 12:27 AM

Ya know there’s more that one kind of oak don’t you?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AandCstyle's profile (online now)

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1722 days


#2 posted 03-21-2015 12:34 AM

White oak has tyloses that plug the pores in the wood preventing water infusion which makes the wood rot resistant. Red oak doesn’t have tyloses and IMO isn’t suitable for outdoor projects. Most finishes will need to be repaired/restored periodically due to UV degradation. You can try a quality spar varnish or a clear exterior paint which has UV inhibitors but no coloring pigment. HTH

-- Art

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6574 posts in 1615 days


#3 posted 03-21-2015 12:52 AM

As was said:

White oak = great for outdoor use. They used it quite a bit in ships if that tells you anything.
Red oak = no good. Use something else.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View barada83's profile

barada83

76 posts in 652 days


#4 posted 03-21-2015 03:07 AM

Hey, perhaps the OP has his hands on what is free oak. In this case, it’s not so much a question of longevity but how to get the best use. I also have gotten my hands on some oak that was less than free and would consider using for outdoor. I know it would rot…. eventually. If red oak, it is really porous so try to get something to seal the pores as best as possible to slow the degradation. It is likely too much work, but if you porefilled and then followed with a spar varnish you might do quite well with red oak. Worst case, you could always get coverings too.

-- Mike

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#5 posted 03-21-2015 04:56 AM



Hey, perhaps the OP has his hands on what is free oak. In this case, it s not so much a question of longevity but how to get the best use. I also have gotten my hands on some oak that was less than free and would consider using for outdoor. I know it would rot…. eventually. If red oak, it is really porous so try to get something to seal the pores as best as possible to slow the degradation. It is likely too much work, but if you porefilled and then followed with a spar varnish you might do quite well with red oak. Worst case, you could always get coverings too.

- barada83

This is the problem when posters don’t provide enough information when asking a question and doesn’t respond back when asked for more information.

The answers people leave are full of ifs, ands, buts and maybes. It turns the whole thread into a guessing game.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View devann's profile

devann

2201 posts in 2158 days


#6 posted 03-21-2015 05:20 AM

+1 what Art said.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2155 days


#7 posted 03-22-2015 01:21 AM

The Spar Urethane I have used (MinWax) was not a good choice in our Oklahoma sun. It never got wet but the finish cracked and split in less than 12 months.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Muzzy17's profile

Muzzy17

40 posts in 786 days


#8 posted 03-22-2015 01:49 AM

Hey y’all thanks for all the replays. This stuff that I’m getting is 4×4 x40” skids. Not sure if it’s white or red oak yet(haven’t actually got my hands on it yet) and some of it is gum. If it works out I plan on building outdoor kids furniture with it.

-- Deep rooted Southern Boy and set in my ways!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#9 posted 03-23-2015 01:40 AM

Boat designer Phil Bolger says varnished oak can look good for 2 or 3 days as long as there’s no dew or rain.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com