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Calling All Shopsmith Owners - A Dust Collection Question

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 03-20-2015 06:54 PM 2337 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


03-20-2015 06:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question shopsmith tablesaw jointer milling sanding

Well this is my first day back on my feet since Monday, when I suffered a severe allergic reaction to some Spanish Cedar I was sanding for the liner of a humidor build I am doing. I was using a NIOSH certified face mask with a P100 rating. I guess I didn’t have it fitted to my face properly, and a little of the obnoxious dust got in, maybe a lot. Next thing I knew I was flat on my back for almost a week trying to recover. So this has gotten me very serious about dust collection in my shop. I went out and bought a Dust Deputy by Oneida, and it is phenomenal. There is absolutely NOTHING in my Ridgid shop vac when I use it.

Now the fun begins. I’m quite certain I can hobble the hoses and blast gates etc together to add a vacuum station to all my tools, but the Shopsmith… oh the Shopsmith.

How to do dust collection when operating the Shopsmith is something I can’t find with Google, except for a reference to a dust collection system they had on later models that turned out to be, well, in a word, crap.

So fellow Shopsmith owners, any ideas for dust collecting on a Mark V? Thanks in advance.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/


43 replies so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#1 posted 03-20-2015 07:23 PM

Jerry I got the lower cover and side cover to attempt DC. To call it crap would be a compliment. It conveniently throws the dust directly into your face. I don’t use it anymore. Plus you get the added benefit of watching the lower half of the blade spin. That said I’ve been ripping plywood all morning. I did break it down first.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#2 posted 03-20-2015 07:43 PM



Jerry I got the lower cover and side cover to attempt DC. To call it crap would be a compliment. It conveniently throws the dust directly into your face. I don t use it anymore. Plus you get the added benefit of watching the lower half of the blade spin. That said I ve been ripping plywood all morning. I did break it down first.

- jumbojack

Thanks Jumbojack, I kinda thought that was the case. I’m thinking there may be something I can make out of wood that might work.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#3 posted 03-20-2015 07:43 PM

Sorry to hear that nasty stuff got into your system. If your avatar is any kind of recent, I’d say your mustache is probably where the mask wont seal. I have a full beard and there’s no way I can ever get ANY mask to seal against my face. And no, shaving for me is NOT an option! My youngest daughter is 35 and she’s NEVER seen me without … I’m too dang ugly under it and besides, I’d feel nekkid without it!

As to your dust collector problem, I think I’d start by looking at what some of the folks have done for their miter saws. Some sort of large chute/funnel that will hang off the back of your ShopSmith, or maybe free-stand behind it.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#4 posted 03-20-2015 08:03 PM



Sorry to hear that nasty stuff got into your system. If your avatar is any kind of recent, I d say your mustache is probably where the mask wont seal. I have a full beard and there s no way I can ever get ANY mask to seal against my face. And no, shaving for me is NOT an option! My youngest daughter is 35 and she s NEVER seen me without … I m too dang ugly under it and besides, I d feel nekkid without it!

As to your dust collector problem, I think I d start by looking at what some of the folks have done for their miter saws. Some sort of large chute/funnel that will hang off the back of your ShopSmith, or maybe free-stand behind it.

- JoeinGa

Joe, thanks, the mustache is not getting in the way, but I didn’t have the lower part of the mask secured properly, and I got some seepage. I’ve been thinking along the lines of a sort of a flat funnel arrangement I could make out of wood to custom fit the bottom of the SS table.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1956 posts in 1455 days


#5 posted 03-20-2015 08:19 PM

I have a Shopsmith that I use for some things and catching the dust is almost impossible.

If I were you, I might go see a professional to get a mask fit properly. Where I worked we had to wear masks and had a fit test by certified people and it did make a big difference. Of course the other part is that all your clothes, hair and everything else has the dust on it and has to be cleaned and put somewhere so that you will not breath the dust.

View MrToolHunter's profile

MrToolHunter

78 posts in 3140 days


#6 posted 03-20-2015 08:52 PM

Which functions on the Shopsmith machine are you looking to collect dust from? Which model do you own? I have a Mark V Model 510 and the dust port on the tablesaw and sanding disc are excellent. This same lower saw guard/dust chute is used on the Model 505, 520 and the new Mark 7. The saw guard on all previous Shopsmith tools were designed to protect Shopsmith, if you know what I mean, and dust collection was an afterthought. I use a Shopsmith DC3300 dust collector, but a ShopVac will work too, if you can stand the decibels. Because the guards are designed to work with 2 1/2” vac hose fittings the 4”-6” hoses found on other dust collectors will create a challenge that must be met with duct tape or other creative solutions.

-- http://www.MrToolHunter.com and http://www.Youtube.com/MrToolHunter

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

492 posts in 1735 days


#7 posted 03-20-2015 09:14 PM

I have seen people use the helmet mask thing with air filter because they are allergic

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#8 posted 03-20-2015 09:48 PM



Which functions on the Shopsmith machine are you looking to collect dust from? Which model do you own? I have a Mark V Model 510 and the dust port on the tablesaw and sanding disc are excellent. This same lower saw guard/dust chute is used on the Model 505, 520 and the new Mark 7. The saw guard on all previous Shopsmith tools were designed to protect Shopsmith, if you know what I mean, and dust collection was an afterthought. I use a Shopsmith DC3300 dust collector, but a ShopVac will work too, if you can stand the decibels. Because the guards are designed to work with 2 1/2” vac hose fittings the 4”-6” hoses found on other dust collectors will create a challenge that must be met with duct tape or other creative solutions.

- MrToolHunter

Is this the type you have?

http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/sawguardsystem.htm

I’m mainly concerned with table saw dust collection. Jumbojack says his does not work well, you say yours does. I wonder if you have a different setup than him?

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#9 posted 03-20-2015 09:48 PM



Jerry I got the lower cover and side cover to attempt DC. To call it crap would be a compliment. It conveniently throws the dust directly into your face. I don t use it anymore. Plus you get the added benefit of watching the lower half of the blade spin. That said I ve been ripping plywood all morning. I did break it down first.

- jumbojack

Is this the type you have?

http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/sawguardsystem.htm

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View beamrider's profile

beamrider

24 posts in 2456 days


#10 posted 03-20-2015 11:10 PM

A thick line of Vaseline around the mask will seal it, even if you have facial hair. Pain in the ass to wash out, but it works.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#11 posted 03-20-2015 11:21 PM



A thick line of Vaseline around the mask will seal it, even if you have facial hair. Pain in the ass to wash out, but it works.

- beamrider

Nice! Thanks for the tip!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#12 posted 03-20-2015 11:47 PM

Oh SURE Jerry. I wanna be there when you TRY to explain the VASELINE in your mustache to you wife!
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#13 posted 03-21-2015 12:04 AM



Oh SURE Jerry. I wanna be there when you TRY to explain the VASELINE in your mustache to you wife!
.

- JoeinGa

Oh yeah, hadn’t thought of that, maybe some double sided carpet tape…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1053 posts in 1584 days


#14 posted 03-21-2015 12:23 AM

If you’re not on the Shopsmith forums, join that one. Everything you ever wanted to know about Shopsmith is all there. Lots of great people too.

http://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/

What model of SS do you have? The Originals (Model 500) are absolutely miserable with dust collection and it’s an obvious after thought. I understand the 505s and up have better guards and better dust collection but some modifications may still be required.

For sanding you may want to consider a down draft table for dust collection.

If you want to get serious about dust collection though, step 1 is to move away from the canister vac method. For dust collection, it’s all about the fine dust. That means CFM and static pressure not suction. You won’t pick up a bowling ball with a dust collector and you don’t need to. You need to get the small fine dust particles out of the air.

Google Bill Pentz. and you will find more information than most will ever want to know about dust collection.

After a ton of researching and cost analysis, I personally decided to move the other way with regards to dust collection and i’m now using hand tools more and more. They don’t create nearly as much dust, and definitely don’t fling it into the air the way machines do. The chips and localized dust are easily swept up with a broom and dust pan. Overall this switch has made the hobbyist nature of my wood working much quieter and more enjoyable to me.

On the occasions I do use machines now. (mostly my 1955 SS) I have the garage door open and high volume fans pushing the air out of the garage. This strategy drastically reduces the dust layering/build up in my garage. I do use the shop vac when using the Bandsaw SPT. all the others, I let the fan blow the fines out of the garage and clean up with a broom and shop vac.

I’m not done in the shop until my wife’s car is parked in it and it better not get a layer of dust deposited on it overnight.

I also do not struggle with allergies or negative reactions (yet).

-- - Terry

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1768 posts in 1114 days


#15 posted 03-21-2015 01:07 AM


If you re not on the Shopsmith forums, join that one. Everything you ever wanted to know about Shopsmith is all there. Lots of great people too.

http://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/

I will do that.


What model of SS do you have? The Originals (Model 500) are absolutely miserable with dust collection and it s an obvious after thought. I understand the 505s and up have better guards and better dust collection but some modifications may still be required.

I have the worst, a 500 Greenie. I’ve restored it, but the basic problems remain because of the design.


For sanding you may want to consider a down draft table for dust collection.

That’s a great idea. I’d forgotten about those


If you want to get serious about dust collection though, step 1 is to move away from the canister vac method. For dust collection, it s all about the fine dust. That means CFM and static pressure not suction. You won t pick up a bowling ball with a dust collector and you don t need to. You need to get the small fine dust particles out of the air.

Google Bill Pentz. and you will find more information than most will ever want to know about dust collection.

I understand that, and I’ve already spent a lot of time on Bill Pentz website, but the cost of a system like the Clearview is way beyond my reach. That doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try to improve things more. Right now, a 6.5 HP Ridgid shop vac and a dust deputy, along with the Grizzly dust collector I bought last week and a good respirator is what I can afford. I am thinking of building a cyclonic dust collector for the shop, but according to the requirements on Pentz’ website, I need a 5 HP motor to power it. I have a 10 HP 3 phase motor that I bought off of Craigslist before I understood the difference between 3 phase and single phase. I can’t use it because I don’t have and cannot get 3 phase to my shop. It’s basically brand new and it’s just sitting in my shop waiting for the day I can sell it or trade it for a 5 HP single phase motor for my cyclonic dust collector build.


After a ton of researching and cost analysis, I personally decided to move the other way with regards to dust collection and i m now using hand tools more and more. They don t create nearly as much dust, and definitely don t fling it into the air the way machines do. The chips and localized dust are easily swept up with a broom and dust pan. Overall this switch has made the hobbyist nature of my wood working much quieter and more enjoyable to me.

I do use hand tools whenever possible, but I think it’s important to point out in this discussion that Bill Pentz’ documentation specifically mentions that hand tools also create a significant amount of the dangerous 2-3 micron particles, so in my personal opinion, I think it’s important for all woodworkers, myself included, to get good dust collection in their shop as soon as they can manage it.


On the occasions I do use machines now. (mostly my 1955 SS) I have the garage door open and high volume fans pushing the air out of the garage. This strategy drastically reduces the dust layering/build up in my garage. I do use the shop vac when using the Bandsaw SPT. all the others, I let the fan blow the fines out of the garage and clean up with a broom and shop vac.

I m not done in the shop until my wife s car is parked in it and it better not get a layer of dust deposited on it overnight.

A great strategy if you’re not living in Oregon in the wintertime. For me, that is very seldom an option


I also do not struggle with allergies or negative reactions (yet).

Neither did I. In my whole life I’ve always been completely unaffected by allergens. I think what happened to me is that my face was very close to the work, my mask was not sealing correctly, and I just got hammered with a huge load of Spanish Cypress dust at one sitting. The effect was overwhelming. I went to bed feeling just fine, and the next morning, I was FUBAR.

Thanks for your impressive contribution to this thread Terry

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

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