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Gluing veneer without clamps

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Forum topic by teejay posted 1870 days ago 1933 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


1870 days ago

I have been asked to add veneer over a plywood curved dropdown ceiling. The red oak plywood was stained horribly and they want cherry/maple to be veneered over it.

I am using cherry plywood on the underside and using maple veneers for the vertical sections. My question is this:

Since adding clamps to this is not possible for me, what do you suggest I use to glue the veneer in place? Contact cement will be quite difficult to align and place considering the curves on the vertical section. Is there a glue that bonds enough to hold the veneer in place while not making it impossible to move like contact cement?


21 replies so far

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2596 days


#1 posted 1870 days ago

Vacuum press will do the job, or good old hide glue and hammer veneering.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 1879 days


#2 posted 1870 days ago

Second the hide glue and veneer hammer. It has excellent initial grab but can be taken apart if necessary.

http://www.inthewoodshop.org/2005/hideglue.shtml

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8724 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 1870 days ago

Now let me understand this, you would be applying the veneer to a cove ceiling? So that means you would be doing the work overhead?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

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teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


#4 posted 1869 days ago

right. It is a drop down ceiling with a continuous curve on the inside and an outside shape of a rectangle. All work is done overhead.

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Todd A. Clippinger

8724 posts in 2704 days


#5 posted 1869 days ago

This is a tough one.

I would never use contact cement with veneer. It always creeps and cracks over time.

I had a lively debate with a guy from one of the local shops because they did the cabinets and teller stations for my local credit union. They used contact cement and within 5 years it looks like CRAP!

Score one for the American Craftsman workshop and zero for the local commercial shop. But they don’t give a crap about quality and the construction company wanted it cheap, so …

I am not sure that there is an easy solution to this one. You are being asked to put veneer over something that is already stained and finished. This is not going in a good direction.

Without being on site it is very difficult to make a solid recommendation.

Is there a chance of toning or glazing to get it to come around to an acceptable or complimentary color? Is painting it a complimentary color an option? Keep in mind if it is oak, the grain texture will show through the paint.

I have said “no” to jobs that I did not feel comfortable backing up.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View James's profile

James

162 posts in 1886 days


#6 posted 1869 days ago

is it possible to veneer it correcty to a bendable substrate and then glue the substrate to the ceiling? not much experience in veneering but maybe that would allow you to use your contact cement

-- James, Bluffton, IN

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Catspaw

236 posts in 2420 days


#7 posted 1869 days ago

We have run up against this sort of thing before. Generally speaking, this is the kind of job you walk away from. The client wants something inexpensive, AND it can be done…..BUT, not cheaply.

It is possible to actually build a new ceiling that would fit into this one and do it right. But, if that were the case, it would probably be just as cheap and most likely better to rip out the old one and do it right from the start.

Fixing the mistakes of others is almost always more expensive and more problematic than demo and rebuild. I walk away from these. This is what we call “polishing a turd.” [no matter how shiny you get it…..it’s still a turd.]

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2349 days


#8 posted 1869 days ago

See if this procedure might work for you. http://lumberjocks.com/tenontim/blog/8856

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teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


#9 posted 1869 days ago

It is a red oak plywood that has been butchered with stain. There is no finish on the ply. They slapped wood filler all over it and tried to stain it and it looks like garbage.

My plan was to sand the existing plywood smooth. Glue and brad nail 1/4” cherry on the underside and flush trim it to the curves. Then go through with the cherry veneer and glue it to the inside and outside vertical sections (using the veneer to cap the edge of the new plywood).

I’m confident they will like the results as the sample was appreciated, I just want to make sure that the veneer sticks up there well and I have time to reposition it to follow the contours of the curves.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2498 days


#10 posted 1869 days ago

I would politely decline doing the job as is or suggest ripping the ceiling down and doing it over.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 2163 days


#11 posted 1869 days ago

Just for the sake of knowing what you are trying to do, can you take a few pictures and post them for us to see. I just did some curved brow windows and I am getting ready to do a blog on how I did these. Maybe I can help if I knew what exactly the ceiling looks like.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

View teejay's profile

teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


#12 posted 1869 days ago

OK. I can’t get a picture but I drew it up on sketchup to try and give you a visual of what it looks like.

Here is the general idea of what is existing. drop ceiling

Picture it all in oak plywood. I want to add the new cherry ply on the bottom, then stick the veneer to the inside and outside parts.

Thanks for the help

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 2163 days


#13 posted 1869 days ago

Ok. How tall is the inside and outside portions you want to veneer? I’m thinking this may not be as bad as it looks.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


#14 posted 1869 days ago

10 inches top to bottom

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teejay

95 posts in 1871 days


#15 posted 1869 days ago

there are some bad butt joints in the existing plywood that I need to fill and sand down smooth to accept the veneer. I have some hide glue that I planned on using for the veneering.

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