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Forum topic by dfox52 posted 03-18-2015 12:30 PM 588 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


03-18-2015 12:30 PM

This is probably more of a “home improvement” project than a “woodworking” project but I’m sure there is a wealth of expertise to draw on in this forum so I thought I would give it a shot. I need some ideas on how to hang solid wood shelves in my kitchen. They need to be sturdy shelves that will hold dishes, pots, and maybe even boxes full of stuff. I plan to use 5/4×12 pine for the shelves along with some decorative wood support brackets. So I need ideas on the best way to attach both the shelves and the brackets to the wall (drywall with studs 16” O.C.) without showing screw holes or hardware. The shelves will be about six feet long, 1 1/8” thick and 11 1/2” deep.

I seem to recall a video or pictorial I saw a while back that involved french cleats and notching the shelf supports to attach from behind but I can’t remember the details. (I don’t like the wood brackets with the “keyhole” mounts on the back. They just don’t seem sturdy enough). So if anyone has a method or knows of a blog article or video that would help, I would much appreciate it.

Thanks!


12 replies so far

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HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 682 days


#1 posted 03-18-2015 02:34 PM

You could use a Z Bracket where essentially you attach a cleat to the wall and then an opposing locking cleat to shelf. When you place the shelf on the wall the cleats wedge the shelf against the wall.

You could make a cleat with threaded rods perpendicular to the wall, slide the shelf onto the rods and then lock the shelves into the cleat with nuts you add through a clearance hole.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


#2 posted 03-18-2015 02:45 PM



You could use a Z Bracket where essentially you attach a cleat to the wall and then an opposing locking cleat to shelf. When you place the shelf on the wall the cleats wedge the shelf against the wall.

You could make a cleat with threaded rods perpendicular to the wall, slide the shelf onto the rods and then lock the shelves into the cleat with nuts you add through a clearance hole.

- HornedWoodwork

Thanks for the input. How would you fasten the wood supports to the wall?

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HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 03-19-2015 11:57 AM

Locate and mark the studs, assuming that each shelf is not less than 16” long you should be able to screw each cleat onto the studs. Fasten the cleat first then attach the shelves to the cleats.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#4 posted 03-19-2015 12:06 PM

I don’t think 1 1/8 inch is thick enough to do what you want to do. Every floating shelf I’ve seen is essentially a torsion box open on the back and slid over steel supports.

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helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#5 posted 03-19-2015 12:42 PM

You know it might be an opportunity to just go ahead and make 2 or three upper open cabinets in a conventional manner with or without face frames. You could put doors on them on down the road to hide the clutter. It could be a nice learning project. It’s just a thought.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


#6 posted 03-19-2015 03:33 PM



You know it might be an opportunity to just go ahead and make 2 or three upper open cabinets in a conventional manner with or without face frames. You could put doors on them on down the road to hide the clutter. It could be a nice learning project. It s just a thought.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

Yes I have thought about that but the wife specifically wants shelves. I may draw up something like you suggest and see what she thinks though.

- helluvawreck


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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


#7 posted 03-19-2015 03:38 PM



I don t think 1 1/8 inch is thick enough to do what you want to do. Every floating shelf I ve seen is essentially a torsion box open on the back and slid over steel supports.

- dhazelton

Thanks d but these are not intended to be floating shelves (hence the need for support brackets underneath). If I were making floating shelves I would probably go with a torsion box. I’m just trying to think of a better way to attach the brackets to the wall.

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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


#8 posted 03-19-2015 03:53 PM

This is the kind of look I am going for:

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dfox52

21 posts in 1161 days


#9 posted 03-19-2015 04:05 PM

Maybe the “keyhole” plates are the only way…

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 690 days


#10 posted 03-19-2015 04:08 PM

The brackets appear to be 32” Ø. If you intend to produce similar brackets, you could hollow out a reproducible section at the back of each bracket. Fabricate a flat metal plate with a slot cut into it and screw into the back of the bracket.

You can then locate the appropriate studs, level across the area and screw a bolt with a washer into each stud. Slide each bracket over a bolt. Adjust each bolt to retain the bracket against the wall but still allow for removal.

Sit the shelf on the brackets, mark the Ø then counter sink deep enough to allow for a plug then pre-drill. Screwing the shelf to the brackets will keep them aligned vert.

-- I meant to do that!

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#11 posted 03-20-2015 01:21 PM

AH! I put up a couple of shelves like that with wooden brackets bought at Home Depot. My house is 1840s and studs are all over the place so I used the large hollow wall anchors that screw in. They are supposed to hold something like 25 lbs, so if the load is spread out it should be okay. The brackets have four holes in them and I left the screws exposed. You could probably get plugs to cover them.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


#12 posted 03-20-2015 01:30 PM

You can make the shelves in the same manner with a lower board under the shelf and then screw through that board. Not “exactly” what you’re thinking but very effective look at these, they were made from pine, held books, and were mounted to the wall with hollow wall anchors, because of course since there were six of them, three to a side nothing lined up on a stud. Nothing real fancy & I’ve only got pictures because I sold them on CL


-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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