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How much dado is too much?

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Forum topic by CB_Cohick posted 03-17-2015 01:57 PM 938 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 711 days


03-17-2015 01:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining dado standard depth

I am building a version of Norm’s router table from the Creston WW plans. For the drawers, the plans call for 1/2” x 3/8” dadoes in 1/2” stock. That seems a bit much to me. I may end up decreasing that depth some partially dependent on the LJ wisdom I may receive :-) My gut feeling is that half of whatever stock I am using is about as far as I should go, but I am a novice. What say you, Lumberjocks?

Thanks in advance for your input.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.


22 replies so far

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waho6o9

7168 posts in 2037 days


#1 posted 03-17-2015 02:03 PM

Wise move

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 691 days


#2 posted 03-17-2015 02:15 PM

1/3 to 1/2 deep on dado. I think his plans call out for too much. I never thought he was St. Norm. I cant put my finger on it. Maybe its just the praise and adoration he gets from so many. Any way, good thought in cutting the dado down.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 711 days


#3 posted 03-17-2015 02:20 PM



I never thought he was St. Norm. I cant put my finger on it. Maybe its just the praise and adoration he gets from so many.

- SirIrb

St. Norm, now that’s funny :-D I love watching New Yankee Workshop. Norm builds some nice furniture, and has been a pioneer in developing woodworking programming. But, as you suggest, his way is not the only way.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 711 days


#4 posted 03-17-2015 02:41 PM

I think I just figured out the discrepancy. The plans suggest in the materials list that drawers are constructed from 1/2” ply. However, adding up the width of the drawer pieces + the drawer slides makes it clear the intent is to use 3/4” ply. Problem solved.

However, I am still curious what everyone’s thoughts are on a guideline for dado depths. So far we have one vote for 1/3 to 1/2 of the overall thickness.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#5 posted 03-17-2015 02:44 PM

As a general rule of thumb I stick with half the thickness of the material I’m dadoing,I believe that even 1/4” deep dados are plenty strong,basically you just need enough of a dado to have sufficient material to have good shearing strength. I can’t believe I’m conterdicking good old Norm :(

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 711 days


#6 posted 03-17-2015 02:49 PM


I can t believe I m conterdicking good old Norm :(

- a1Jim


I think you are ok with Norm. I misled you by misinterpreting the plans :-)

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#7 posted 03-17-2015 02:54 PM

Whewwwwwww!
Thanks, Norm was a major influence in my woodworking adventures

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 03-17-2015 03:02 PM

I vote 1/2 or less depending on the stock. Up to 3/4 I’d opt for 1/2. Over 3/4 I’d step down to 1/3 or so, and probably not go any thicker than 1/2” ever.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2889 days


#9 posted 03-17-2015 03:03 PM

For 3/4” drawers, 1/4” should be good. But, no more than 3/8.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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NoThanks

798 posts in 989 days


#10 posted 03-17-2015 03:12 PM

I’ve always used 1/4” deep for 3/4 stock on cabinetry.
Anything else I just use my best judgement.
All materials require different methods.
I might do different depths in plywood compared to hardwood or particle board.
For me there is no rule of thumb.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#11 posted 03-17-2015 03:18 PM

Wikipedia

“A rule of thumb is a principle with broad application that is not intended to be strictly accurate or reliable for every situation. It is an easily learned and easily applied procedure for approximately calculating or recalling some value, or for making some determination” :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 683 days


#12 posted 03-17-2015 03:25 PM

Sometimes people need a perspective slap.

Just to point out the obvious, there were many people involved in the making of and processes of TNYW and all woodworking shows. The main process is providing entertainment.

2nd is safety, the insurance companies involved can’t afford lawsuits so they go out of their way to provide a show that shows the safest method and won’t implicate itself. That way if someone gets hurt emulating the project, the show can provide proof they weren’t the cause, never alluding to any unsafe methods. One would be amazed at how many try to make a living out of law suits, (and I don’t mean lawyers).

3rd, consider the projects Mr. Abrams completed; anyone in the woodworking trade, (framing, carpentry, furniture making) for any length of time has the tools and knowledge to construct everything he did and in some cases better and faster. Everyone else without the tools and knowledge, in most cases didn’t understand most of what he said or did with any clarity. The proof is when one hears a customer say, “Well, that’s not the way Norm does or did it”! Dimes to dollars tons of us have heard that one maybe more than once.

4th, “How can it be that expensive, Norm does it in a half hour TV show”! Many viewers temporarily, (I hope) lose the ability to conceptualize time and cause and effect. The project on the TV show wasn’t completed in a half hour but in many cases days worth of labor by multiple people let alone the production crew set ups between takes. Often I’d notice day and night conditions in the same episode through a window as Norm passed by.

“Norm never makes mistakes”. If you watch the old shows you see Norm begin the episode, watch his hands, in some episodes less than halfway through the episode Norm has one or more wounds on his hands and or Band-Aids. I always wished they’d show a mistake or outtakes of failures. I really appreciated Tim Yoder and his wood turning series, he wasn’t afraid to show errors or talk about them during the show.

Lastly like Norm, most or all the tools seen on all the woodworking shows are donated by the manufacturing companies as advertising. Any tool not donated/gifted to the show has its name and or logo blacked out. The only way to know the manufacture is to be aware of the tool colors and body styles same goes for the lumber, if the show pays for it, the retailer is not mentioned.

-- I meant to do that!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1467 days


#13 posted 03-17-2015 03:30 PM

Usually I start at 1/4” and may go upwards of 1/2 the thickness, depending on how much weight I think it may need to hold.
.
.

Is “conterdicking ” even a word?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#14 posted 03-17-2015 03:33 PM

Since I’m a perpetual novice, in a bookshelf, I have used 1/8” dados with screws – yes – into the end grain (long screws).

We shoiuld do a test – make a little stool like that and see if a 200lb man can stand on it. I suspect it would hold just fine. Wood is very strong in compression along the end grain.

I remember looking up some guidelines for framing construciton. An 8ft tall triple 2×6 column (3 pine 2×6’s nailed together) is rated to safely carry something like 26,000lb! That’s over 1000lb per square inch of cross section. So, a 1/8” deep dado, on a 4” wide board should be able to carry a static load of 500lb (as long as there is something holding the shelf firmly in the dado, so it doesn’t slip out).

But, I suppose we also have to consider that the end of the board inserted into the dado is subject to crushing in the direction of the flat grain. Hmmm … possibly that’s the limiting factor.

-Paul

P.S. Hey! I have a cat just like that too!

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#15 posted 03-17-2015 03:45 PM

Hey Joe

“Is “conterdicking ” even a word? ” I checked no it’s not a word. Just consider the source :)
Have good one buddy.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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