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Waterlox for table tops?

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Forum topic by JayPique posted 06-13-2009 04:19 AM 19407 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JayPique

61 posts in 2754 days


06-13-2009 04:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: waterlox table top finish

I’ve heard that when cured, Waterlox is a very hard, very durable finish that doesn’t show scratching much. I’m making a couple tables for a coffee shop and was wondering if anyone could confirm this or offer an alternative that would hold up well, yet not look plasticy – which is also important to the client.

Thanks.

JP


19 replies so far

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

273 posts in 2776 days


#1 posted 06-13-2009 07:01 AM

Hi, JayPique!

We used Waterlox (the Original/regular formula) on our oak kitchen countertops. It really does a great job at bringing out the grain and does not leave the wood looking like it has a plastic surface over it. Another positive is that it’s easy to reapply without restripping/sanding. We’ve been in our house a few years now and our countertops have seen a significant amount of activity. The Waterlox handles that wear-n-tear gracefully.

One of the biggest selling points for me was the way it bonds with the wood and isn’t supposed to crack, chip, or peel.

Careful how you store that Waterlox. The best way I’ve found to prevent the oxidation (it’ll start skimming over the top) is to decant the unused portions into a smaller container, with little or no airspace in the top. Haven’t used Bloxygen, but I’ve read that it isn’t worth the money.

Compare this to water-based Polycrylic, which we used on our oak bathroom vanity top. While it does give a clear, hard finish, it really does nothing to lend contrast for the grain (ie. it doesn’t make it “pop”, like Waterlox does… it simply looks like a plastic coating.)

Hope that helps!

P.S. Another product I’ve recently started using but already like about as much as Waterlox is General Finishes’ Arm-R-Seal.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3234 days


#2 posted 06-14-2009 05:26 AM

yea waterlox will work great. so will gneral finishes arm r seal or seal a cell. just remember if youre doing a tabletop with it you should probably go with at least 7 coats for protection

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JayPique

61 posts in 2754 days


#3 posted 06-14-2009 07:11 PM

Waterlox it is. I’ve put a couple coats on so far – do you really think I need SEVEN?! I’m applying it with a foam brush. WRT oxidation, I’ve just been leaking some propane from a blow-torch into the can right before I close it. It’s heavier than air, so I think it should work about the same as Bloxygen.

Thanks for the replies.

JP

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 3713 days


#4 posted 06-14-2009 07:24 PM

Waterlox is the best product on the market today. The original regular formula. Yes it takes many coats to build up a good protective surface, especially on a tabletop. It is thin, and and is absorbed into the wood quit well. Say hi to my Grandson Logan.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

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JayPique

61 posts in 2754 days


#5 posted 06-15-2009 03:09 AM

Hi Logan! I’m jealous of him for having someone to teach him woodworking at a young age – I hope you pass along your knowlege. My two nephews are regular helpers in the shop. They love to vacuum – which is a real bonus!

JP

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teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3234 days


#6 posted 06-15-2009 03:17 AM

5 to seven should do good. like jockmike said its thin and the first few coats are going to be absorbed. it takes awhile to build up the finish. thats why i like to use faster drying stuff like sprayed water based for items like tabletops because you can get the finish you need much faster.

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1879 posts in 3457 days


#7 posted 06-15-2009 06:22 AM

Waterlox, if I’m not mistaken, was originally developed for floor finishing. I sues it for my turnings and other projects and absolutely love it.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#8 posted 06-15-2009 06:51 AM

I prefer water base because it has much less fumes and drys quickly for easy re coating and durability

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View h2olox's profile

h2olox

6 posts in 2733 days


#9 posted 06-16-2009 08:44 PM

There are a couple of ways to define DURABLE. Waterlox forms an elastic, protective finish that won’t chip, peel, crack, or wrinkle. While urethanes are slightly harder than our tung oil/resin finishes, Waterlox retains a tough yet elastic surface that “gives” with the blows of everyday life. Because our finishes penetrate into your wood floors, when scratches or wear areas do occur, they are far less noticeable than with a urethane finish that simply lies on the surface. If noticeable scratches occur, all you need to do is clean the damaged area well with soap and water and then reapply a new coat where needed. No need to sand down to bare wood or refinish the entire surface.

That being said, since Waterlox is a resin modified Tung oil based varnish, it will penetrate into the wood and build up to a finish. Therefore it does not have the plasticy look that many urethane based products produce.

Hope this helps.

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to call us at Waterlox (800) 321-0377.

View JayPique's profile

JayPique

61 posts in 2754 days


#10 posted 06-17-2009 03:29 AM

Thanks for the reply, h2olox – it’s nice to have info straight from the manufacturer! So far I’ve just been brushing on coats with a foam brush, but I’m wondering if spraying it wouldn’t work just as well? Does it still penetrate like brushing? Also, what sort of cure period should I allow before putting it to use? Thanks.

JP

View h2olox's profile

h2olox

6 posts in 2733 days


#11 posted 06-17-2009 07:34 PM

There are many ways in which people have been successful in applying Waterlox finishes. That being said, a foam brush can create bubbles in the finish; therefore we recommend a natural bristle brush or a lambs wool applicator for the application.

Spraying does not change the durability of our coating as long as you apply it with the same spread rate as if putting it down with a brush or a lambs wool applicator – 125 sq. ft per quart/coat. It is just a little more difficult to accomplish. If you do choose to apply the finish with a sprayer, apply about 3 mils wet, with good drying conditions, about 24 hours later you can apply a second coat. You’ll know when to re-apply by lightly sanding a small area with 220 grit papers, if it powders its ready to go, if it gums, wait a little longer.

As for cure time: After the last coat is applied, we advise let dry for at least 24 hours. During the first 7 days keep room/ambient temperature above 70° F if possible. Air movement in the room helps replenish the required oxygen needed to cure the finish. After 7 days, the finish should be ready for normal use.

Hope this helps.

Chip Schaffner – Waterlox Coatings – 800-321-0377

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JayPique

61 posts in 2754 days


#12 posted 06-18-2009 12:21 AM

Thanks again, Chip.

JP

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3234 days


#13 posted 06-18-2009 01:04 AM

spraying with oil is not really the best idea. it can be done but its got alot of overspray and that gets the oil all over you and everything just gets all sticky. i would just stick to applying it with the brush like h2olox said above.

View cosmicturner's profile

cosmicturner

403 posts in 2862 days


#14 posted 12-16-2009 07:38 AM

thank you all. this is very good information

-- Cosmicturner

View BloxygenBoy's profile

BloxygenBoy

9 posts in 2982 days


#15 posted 07-18-2010 06:38 PM

Relative to using propane as a cover gas, I don’t recommend it. First of all, propane is an extremely reactive chemical, that’s why it burns. Bloxygen uses ultra pure Argon, a noble gas that reacts with nothing; it’s totally inert. When using the heavy, natural argon in Bloxygen, the cost is only about 12-24 cents per use, so cost is really not the issue. Be safe please.

-- Use Bloxygen's gas to preserve finish leftovers in their original containers.

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