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Forum topic by BUpstate posted 06-11-2009 04:58 PM 1688 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BUpstate

7 posts in 2736 days


06-11-2009 04:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: design plan tv stand expansion cherry sideboard

I am designing a cherry tv stand based on this piece of furniture.

I have a couple questions.

1. If the grain on the top is running horizontally, perpendicular to the sides and center drawer partitions, will there be any expansion problems? I planned dadoes for the 2 center partitions.

2. What would you recommend for the joints between the sides and top/bottom?

3. I planned a mortised and tenonned cherry “face frame” on the back for stability. The two ways I considered attaching it with biscuits are (i) on the back face or (ii) butting it inside the sides, top, and bottom.

4. I considered using cherry plywood joined to 4” cherry boards for the bottom and the center partitions. Would this cause more problems (i.e., uneven expansion) than it would be worth?

Thank you for any input.

B


7 replies so far

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WibblyPig

168 posts in 2739 days


#1 posted 06-12-2009 01:00 PM

1) Attach it loosely to the sides to allow for the expansion. Glue and screw the partitions at the front and allow the rest to “float” (unless they’re plywood panels then glue and screw away).

2) A slotted fastener that allows for movement.

3) I’d probably do it solid all the way around so it all moves together.

4) That would probably be a good way to go – you can glue the plywood panels in because they won’t move and that will give you a good solid base for the sides to move around.

This is just a personal opinion, but I think that in the climate controlled homes of today, wood movement isn’t nearly the issue that it was even 50 years ago. Doors don’t stick, cabinets don’t stick, etc. The wood will move a bit, but not nearly what you think it will.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

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BUpstate

7 posts in 2736 days


#2 posted 06-13-2009 01:12 PM

Thank you for the response.

The house it will live in was originally built in the late 1700’s. The house has been renovated many times, but wood does move around. In the winter, the maple flooring shrinks and opens seams between the boards. In the summer, the pine door on the built-in cabinet takes considerable persuasion to open. I just want to build a piece that is going to last, so I’m being on the safe side.

Thanks,
B

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WibblyPig

168 posts in 2739 days


#3 posted 06-14-2009 06:12 PM

Then slotted fasteners (metal or wood) will be the answer for any cross grain situations. Probably the most important thing to do will be to finish both sides of the wood so there isn’t uneven moisture absorption.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#4 posted 06-14-2009 08:28 PM

I’m not really clear what the ends look like but if they are a frame and panel I would NOT glue the panel just the frame. As for the rest of the construction it depends if you have an interior frame or not. The most stable wood would be Plywood and if you don’t want to use that use 1/4 sawn cherry.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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BUpstate

7 posts in 2736 days


#5 posted 06-15-2009 01:31 PM

I original planned to have the sides made out of solid cherry with horizontally aligned grain, but I abandoned the idea. The sides will be solid and vertically aligned. There will be a frame with panels on the back and a frame underneath the top. The drawer hardware will be attached directly to the sides/center partitions. The center partitions will be solid.

I was thinking about attaching the top frame to the sides with a rabbeted dado. I would like to do dovetails, but I need practice, and this is not the time. I don’t have a dovetail jig for my router.

Again, thanks for the information.

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BUpstate

7 posts in 2736 days


#6 posted 08-12-2011 05:19 AM

Better late than never. Almost done.

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sras

4391 posts in 2594 days


#7 posted 08-12-2011 05:33 AM

You have a pace like mine! Keep plugging away – when it’s done who cares how long it took?

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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