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Forum topic by spindeepster posted 03-14-2015 01:08 PM 1558 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spindeepster

20 posts in 750 days


03-14-2015 01:08 PM

I made this chess board at least two months ago. The tiles are glued to a piece of 1/8” luan. They were laid down 4 tiles at a time, one player’s side first. I then applied the tiles for the other side making a point to glue to the luan and the adjacent tiles. Finally, the border was applied. The board was leaning against the wall next to my desk at work. It was not near any heat source or direct sunlight. It let out a very loud SNAP! Loud enough to startle everyone in the room. Any insight into why this thing popped open like it has? Thanks in advance!

-- How Come I'm Not In Charge?


24 replies so far

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 687 days


#1 posted 03-14-2015 01:50 PM

You are using the rare African Exploding Ebony Tree Woods aren’t you

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

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bobro

308 posts in 770 days


#2 posted 03-14-2015 01:56 PM

The dark wood up and done did shrink, pulling the softer blond wood with it.

You have to mill any air-dried wood, wood of unknown history, checkered past or dubious origin, oversized, let it sit as long as possible in your local clime, then dimension it and slap your thang to it.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#3 posted 03-14-2015 02:03 PM

I would have used a thicker backer board (say 1/4” Baltic birch ply). Depending on how conditions differ in your shop and office, I might have brought the wood into the office and let it acclimate to the office before taking it back into the shop for final cutting and gluing.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#4 posted 03-14-2015 02:10 PM

Just how thick are the tiles? I have to admit, my aging eyes can’t see what happened in those photos.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#5 posted 03-14-2015 02:33 PM

I am thinking there was stress in the glue up and the ply surface was not sanded to get rid of the sealer they put on it when manufactured. Good news is that it cracked at the seam. So, you may be able to save it. If you can peel the whole thing off the ply, glue all the pieces together first before gluing it to the backing. That way only the two surfaces will have moisture exposures (top and bottom, not the sides).

-- earthartandfoods.com

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spindeepster

20 posts in 750 days


#6 posted 03-14-2015 02:34 PM

The tiles and border are 5/8” thick. The separation occurs at the middle seam only, the half-way point between players. No other seams have separated…...........yet. The following pictures will give you a good ides of my process.

First, I glued up walnut and holly like the uncut piece seen here. The chessboard pieces, and this piece were glued and planed over two years ago, and then shelved.

Next, I cut the pieces like this and glued them to the luan, and each other. The split occurs where the opposing sides meet….the 50 yard line if you will.

-- How Come I'm Not In Charge?

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WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1936 days


#7 posted 03-14-2015 02:40 PM

Having them glued to the luan did not allow for any seasonal movement of the chessboard. This set up stress. The separation in the middle relieved the stress. Better to have cut the chessboard squares thicker and eliminate the luan backing. No need for the backing, and the backing did not allow the chessboard squares to move with seasonal changes. Wood has to have room to expand and contract with humidity changes. Even only slightly, but it movement must be accounted for in the design of any piece unless you are using plywood.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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spindeepster

20 posts in 750 days


#8 posted 03-14-2015 02:42 PM



..... If you can peel the whole thing off the ply, glue all the pieces together first before gluing it to the backing. That way only the two surfaces will have moisture exposures (top and bottom, not the sides).

- mrjinx007

I tried that method and there was too much inconsistency with overall thickness. I had to do a lot (A LOT) of sanding to get the chessboard smooth and flat. I opted to glue directly to plywood this time to work with a flatter, and what I thought would be a more dimensionally stable surface.

-- How Come I'm Not In Charge?

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spindeepster

20 posts in 750 days


#9 posted 03-14-2015 02:53 PM

It is interesting that this has happened to me…for the second time. Four years ago I made a board that also split, seen here. Worth noting is the fact that this board is not glued to plywood at all. It was for this very reason that I opted to use the luan.

-- How Come I'm Not In Charge?

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#10 posted 03-14-2015 02:56 PM

I wonder how this would look:
1. put a slight chamfer on each piece
2. glue the pieces only to the ply
3. use an index card between pieces to provide a slight space for wood expansion
4. alternate grain direction so adjacent pieces would not expand in the same direction.

What do you think? Certainly not the traditional look to a chess board, but would it look ok and work?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

758 posts in 1859 days


#11 posted 03-14-2015 03:41 PM

Your problem was caused by gluing the top pieces to the luan plywood. Make the top with splined joints and let it float in an outside frame with dados or slots. See below:

Hope this helps. I have been down a similar road. Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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RogerM

758 posts in 1859 days


#12 posted 03-14-2015 03:42 PM

Your problem was caused by gluing the top pieces to the luan plywood. Make the top with splined joints and let it float in an outside frame with dados or slots. See below:

Hope this helps. I have been down a similar road. Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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RogerM

758 posts in 1859 days


#13 posted 03-14-2015 03:43 PM

Your problem was caused by gluing the top pieces to the luan plywood. Make the top with splined joints and let it float in an outside frame with dados or slots. See below:

Hope this helps. I have been down a similar road. Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#14 posted 03-14-2015 04:40 PM

Last in line…as mentioned (more than once) don’t glue pieces that thick to plywood.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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spindeepster

20 posts in 750 days


#15 posted 03-14-2015 08:09 PM

Then why did the chessboard WITHOUT plywood on the back split?

-- How Come I'm Not In Charge?

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