Work bench

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Forum topic by Rautenbach posted 06-10-2009 08:39 PM 965 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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53 posts in 2722 days

06-10-2009 08:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi can you guys supply me with plans to make my first table with vices etc,and this may sound very stupid but why are there holes drilled in the work top is it to hold the workpiece or what?

-- Rautenbach,South Africa

7 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile


8523 posts in 3070 days

#1 posted 06-10-2009 08:51 PM

here watch this on they show you how to build a very good bench. they also have videos on vises, dog holes (the holes on top of the bench) and accessories you can buy and make for the bench. worth watching. this is similar to my current workbench and it’s sturdy and works great. good place to start.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View HokieMojo's profile


2103 posts in 3149 days

#2 posted 06-10-2009 08:52 PM

I think you will need to do a lot more research before you an even begin to consider building a bench. They are a LOT of work to build and can be somewhat costly. Probably best if you really understand them well before you start trying to build one of your own.

View a1Jim's profile


115177 posts in 2998 days

#3 posted 06-10-2009 08:57 PM

That’s a good one that Purplev gave you. The holes in the top of the bench tops are for what are called bench dogs they are used to hold wood on the bench when sanding or planning or other uses.

-- Custom furniture

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3521 days

#4 posted 06-10-2009 09:09 PM

I did a blog on workbenches some time ago that you can read here.

I cover some things to consider as you try and decide what type of workbench to build. I am a professional and chose not to go with the traditional workbench that many woodworkers use. You really need to consider how you will work and what type of work that you will be performing. This will determine the type of workbench that you need.

A quick example here is that I do not perform a lot of hand work, that is, I do not do a lot of hand planing. The traditional European workbenches are designed to accommodate primarily handwork. That means they need to be heavy and reamain stationary.

Like most woodworker, I need mobility for a flexible work area. My workbench is on wheels but does not move unless I want it to. It is quite heavy but would be frustrating if I did a lot of hand planing.

I hope this information and the blog helps in your decision.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana,

View Milo's profile


869 posts in 2740 days

#5 posted 06-10-2009 11:30 PM

Hi Rautenbach,

My first workbench was based on a Shopnotes design, and ended up weighting a TON (which is an attractive feature in a workbench actually…), but this time I am going to make a Nicholson-based design workbench I saw in ”Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use” by Chris Schwarz. I’ve actually emailed him a couple time and he’s been kind enough to answer my question. It’s still lumber on the floor, but I hope to get started with the cutouts this weekend.

Good luck!


-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View Rautenbach's profile


53 posts in 2722 days

#6 posted 06-11-2009 10:40 AM

Thank You guys you are a great help

-- Rautenbach,South Africa

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2506 posts in 2859 days

#7 posted 06-11-2009 10:50 AM

link to my bench build that has links on it to plans and a video from fine woodworking

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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