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Hardware kit for rolling pin

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Forum topic by PatrickOOOMazing posted 06-10-2009 05:39 AM 6913 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PatrickOOOMazing

20 posts in 2736 days


06-10-2009 05:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: rolling pin kit

Hey guys, my first forum post here and a question which came up in a conversation today about hand rolling pasta.

With my giant knobly hands and soft tender palms, I have some issues with strenuous and prolonged work with my ancient french rolling pin, and with using standard sized rolling pins with handles. The french style rolling pin is just plain uncomfortable, and the handles on the handle style rolling pins are far too close to the work surface for the previously mentioned knobly hands to clear.

So onto my quandary. I have been looking for a kit which allows for the handles to spin independently from the rolling surface. I know they exist, as I have seen similarly finished rolling pins at our local christmas art market. I was quite impressed with their movement (and extravagant price), however I have failed to find a kit online or through searching through this website.

Further to this point, I would not be adverse to creating a kit for myself out of hardware available at the big box store, if plans for such a thing exist somewhere.

An imaginary bowl of hand cut pasta to the lumberjock with a solution to this most grievous of issues


10 replies so far

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3137 days


#1 posted 06-10-2009 07:43 AM

I’d put a dowel (or a rod) through the pin, then put handles on both ends that stuck out. Just let the pin roll around the pin or dowel all day long ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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PatrickOOOMazing

20 posts in 2736 days


#2 posted 06-10-2009 07:50 AM

but then what am i to do with the skateboard i cannibalized for bearings?
while i certainly wont rule this out, im still curious as to where others are finding this hardware.

it should be noted, i am keen to go through a highly complex process of acquisition of parts by various means, and complicated assembly for this which i hardly need.. as i have a pasta machine sitting pretty downstairs currently

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3137 days


#3 posted 06-10-2009 07:55 AM

I don’t know about bearings?? :-)) You must be planning on using this all day every day, eh?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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PatrickOOOMazing

20 posts in 2736 days


#4 posted 06-10-2009 07:58 AM

i did work as a baker… for a short time
but pasta dough tends to be very stiff, and as i would be rolling it out quite thin, i imagine it would take some time.
also, who dosnt love to over-engineer things?

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3137 days


#5 posted 06-10-2009 08:17 AM

Assuming babbit shouldn’t be poured in the ends of the rolling pin since it will be used around food, I guess the end could be counterbored, a bearing inserted, and the rod poked though the bearings, then the handles put on the pin. 1/2 brass should work fine and be plenty strong enough. Squirt a little olive oil on the bearing once in a while and you should be off to high torque rolling :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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LesB

1235 posts in 2904 days


#6 posted 06-10-2009 08:18 AM

I would use sealed bearings recessed into the ends of the roller itself and install a metal or wood rod through the center of the roller through the bearings. Put handles of a suitable size on each end of the dowel.
You can buy sealed ball or roller bearings from bearing supply store (on line if you don’t have one locally). Also most home supply or large hardware stores have a few bearings in the miscellaneous hardware section. Just match the inside diameter to a metal or wood dowel. Add handles of a suitable size to the dowel and you should be all set. You can probably even find stainless steal bearings with a little searching. An alternative to the metal bearings would be to use nylon bushing.

Here is one web site I found that has stainless bearings, poly bearings and also shafts and pins you could use. I did not review everything but it should give you a good place to start. www.kilianbearings.com/stainless-bearings.shtml

-- Les B, Oregon

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PatrickOOOMazing

20 posts in 2736 days


#7 posted 06-10-2009 08:21 AM

thats the ticket!
now all i need is a lathe, HA!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3137 days


#8 posted 06-10-2009 08:30 AM

You wouldn’t need a lathe if you remodeled an existing rolling pin. Drill the counterbores with a planatary bit, then drill all the way through with a wood auger.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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PatrickOOOMazing

20 posts in 2736 days


#9 posted 06-10-2009 08:48 AM

let me rephrase:
now all i need is to have not finished a business in woodworking and had my family decide to sell off ALL the tools!
i preemptively joined this site in the hope that i will soon go on a buying spree!

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lew

11335 posts in 3216 days


#10 posted 06-10-2009 02:21 PM

Here is a link to a project done by “Rogue”. It may give you some ideas.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/11570

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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